U.S. Cultural Studies

http://www.whitworth.edu/Academic/Department/USCulturalStudies/Index.htm

uscs@whitworth.edu

Whitworth’s United States Cultural Studies Program acknowledges that many factors, such as race, ethnicity, national origin, socio-economics, gender, sexual orientation and type of disability, influence our lives and experiences in the United States. In one way or another, others’ perceptions of us, or even our self-perceptions, have been formed by these personal characteristics and by the groups that are identified by these characteristics. Our goal is to study these groups so that we can better understand their lives and our own in the contemporary U.S. Students of all identities and backgrounds are welcomed and encouraged to pursue this minor.

Through this program of study, our goals are...

  1. to study the foundations and interactions of diverse groups living in the U.S. from an interdisciplinary framework.
  2. to develop intercultural competencies for other coursework, graduate or professional schools, and eventual vocations.
  3. to increase willingness and capacity to serve campus and communities by advancing social justice and reconciliation

Requirements for a U.S. Cultural Studies Minor (17-18)

The director of the minor may approve additional or alternate courses that satisfy the learning outcomes of the minor, including off-campus study courses, internships and field research.
IDS 110Introduction to U.S. Cultural Studies1
IDS 310U.S. Cultural Studies: Community-Based Research1
IDS 311U.S. Cultural Studies: Campus-Based Research1
SP 398Intercultural Communication3
Elective credits from the following:11-12
Section I: Structural Frameworks
Community Arts in Practice
Identity, Race, and Power in American Life
Sports and Society
Poverty and Community Development
Psychology of Poverty and Social Class
Race and Ethnicity
Gender, Performance, and Pop Culture
Performing the Self
Religion in American Public Life
Section II: Cultural Contexts
Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
African American History to 1877
African American History Since 1865
Genealogy in Cultural Context
Asian American Film
U.S. Latino/a Film
Native American Film
African American Film
US Tribal Identities
African-American Preaching
Women Writers
Intro Women's and Gender Studies
Note: WGS-196 courses will apply toward this requirement. See advisor for details.

Courses

IDS 110 Introduction to U.S. Cultural Studies1
This course introduces students to critical cultural studies in the contemporary U.S. It is open to all undergraduate students and has no prerequisites. Fall and spring semesters.
IDS 310 U.S. Cultural Studies: Community-Based Research1
This course engages students with community members to work collaboratively to address societal issues confronting diverse populations. This course is open to all students. Fall semester.
IDS 311 U.S. Cultural Studies: Campus-Based Research1
This course engages students with campus members to work collaboratively to address societal issues confronting diverse populations. Spring semester.
SP 398 Intercultural Communication3
Study of how elements such as ritual, status, symbolism, concepts of time and use of space create our worldview. Class promotes cross-cultural understanding using interactive and visual communication to communicate effectively across cultures. Intent is to broaden cultural awareness and enhance multicultural literacy. Jan Term.
AR 315 Community Arts in Practice3
An in-depth study of how the arts are practiced within a community setting. Explores the disciplines of art, theater, and music; students will study a variety of models of how each is used in the context of community development. Emphasis on the practical knowledge needed to execute a public art project. No prerequisites; however, some background in art is recommended. Fall semester.
HI 228 Identity, Race, and Power in American Life3
History and culture of major ethnic and racial groups in American life. Special emphasis on the role of race and nationality in the pursuit and achievement of "the American Dream.",History and culture of major ethnic and racial groups in American life. Special emphasis on the role of race and nationality in the pursuit and achievement of "the American Dream." Since HI 228 includes a substantial off-campus component, students will need personal access to transportation to and from the off-campus sites. Jan Term. Fee.
KIN 430 Sports and Society3
Interrelationships of sports with other aspects of culture. Role of sports in American society.
PO 275 Poverty and Community Development3
Examines the changing tasks of cities and states in managing our societal future and the effectiveness of structures and policies. Highlights the politics of welfare and affirmative action.
PY 330 Psychology of Poverty and Social Class3
Examines how social class affects cognitive, emotional, and social development; how the more affluent make attributions of behavior and circumstances of the poor; and how these attributions affect helping behavior and psychological outcomes. Prerequisite: PY 101. Sophomore level and above. Fall and spring semester.
SO 220 Race and Ethnicity3
Examines racial and ethnic relations around the world, with emphasis on the United States. Students explore race as a social construct and its intersections with class, gender and immigrant status. Emphasis is put on racism within social institutions along with analysis of beliefs and privilege at the individual level. Prerequisite: SO 120.
TA 321 Gender, Performance, and Pop Culture3
Exploration both of gender as performance and gender in performance. Engagement with a range of theories in the areas of gender and representation, including how ideas about gender are portrayed, reinforced, or challenged through a variety of plays, films, and other performance materials.
TA 348 Performing the Self3
Theatre games and performance techniques for effective communication, problem-solving, relationship building, self-exploration and self-expression. No previous performance experience necessary. Sophomore and above. Every other year.
TH 323 Religion in American Public Life3
The major themes, movements, problems, people and institutions in American Christian history, with emphasis on the public practice of the Christian faith. Fall semester, even years.
EDU 326 Equity, Diversity & Inclusion3
The purpose of this course is to increase knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to create environments that are inclusive and enriched by diverse views and people. Increased levels of cultural sensitivity and responsiveness will be developed through didactic and experiential learning. The didactic portion will focus on a survey of historical and societal influences on the education of cultural groups in the USA. This is a step up course; undergraduate students may enroll at the graduate level. It is also a part of the US Cultural Studies Minor. Also listed as EDU 526 and EDC 526.
HI 240 African American History to 18773
Examination of the African/African American experience from the African background through the end of the Reconstruction Era. Topics covered will include African culture/worldview, the trade of enslaved Africans, the Abolition Movement, religious and educational experience, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
HI 241 African American History Since 18653
This course will critically examine the history and culture of African Americans from the end of the Reconstruction Era to the present day. Primary focus will be placed on the examination of significant social movements, themes, and historical figures.
IDS 201 Genealogy in Cultural Context2
This course introduces students to genealogical and historical research in the framework of diverse viewpoints within American society. Students will analyze the cultural diversity of their family history, with particular attention to placing their family in historical context. Spring semester.
IDS 230 Asian American Film2
This course is open to all students. By the end of the course the student will have increased their understanding in: -How Asian American identity is constructed -What is the portrayal of Asian Americans -What are the cultural expectations, assumptions, and impact on Asian Americans and on the 'other' -How is identity being redefined? Spring semester.
IDS 231 U.S. Latino/a Film2
This course introduces students to US Latino/a cultures through film. Students will view films by Latino/a filmmakers, study U.S. History, and learn multicultural theory. Recommended for all students. Spring semester.
IDS 232 Native American Film2
his course introduces Native American cultures to students through film. The class covers U.S. History, Native American cultures, and multicultural theory. Recommended for all students. Fall semester.
IDS 233 African American Film2
This course introduces students to African American culture through films. Students will view films made by African Americans, study U.S. History, and discuss multicultural theory. Recommended for all students. Fall semester.
IDS 235H US Tribal Identities3
A project-driven course that studies US domestic colonialism and the exploitation of special groups. Major ideas covered are critical race theory, internal colonialism, and environmental justice. Involves guest speakers, field trips, research, and a group presentation.
IDS 335H U.S. Tribal Identities3
A project-driven course that studies US domestic colonialism and the exploitation of special groups. Major ideas covered are critical race theory, internal colonialism, and environmental justice. Involves guest speakers, field trips, research, and a group presentation.
SP 436 African-American Preaching3
An introduction to the preaching in African-American traditions as a distinctive communication event. Emphasis is given to historical, cultural, theological, and rhetorical dimensions of preaching in African-American traditions. Periodic offering.
WGS 126 Women Writers3
An overview of women's literary history and an introduction to feminist literary theory. Emphasis on reading, discussion and student response through written and oral assignments. No Prerequisites.
EL 126 Women Writers3
An overview of women's literary history and an introduction to feminist literary theory. Emphasis on reading, discussion and student response through written and oral assignments. Readings include poetry, fiction, and drama. Also listed as WGS 126.
WGS 201 Intro Women's and Gender Studies3
Emphasis on women's social, political and personal experience. Includes classic and contemporary feminist theory; patterns of male/female relationships; health, gender and medicine; women and poverty; homelessness; gender role socialization; women in the workforce; sexual harassment; domestic life; spirituality; a service-learning component; and the history and variety of women's protest in America.
Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Director

STACY KEOGH