Health Sciences

http://www.whitworth.edu/healthscience

The Whitworth Health Sciences Department offers majors in health science (for both a B.S. and a B.A.), community health, athletic training, and nursing.

Health SciencesThe mission of the Whitworth Health Sciences Department is to equip its graduates to serve humanity through study of the form and function of the human body and the body’s connection to health and wellness. Through a curriculum that integrates theory and practice, graduates will be able to appreciate this relationship both critically and creatively and will learn to apply it to various health-related fields.

The learning outcomes of this major prepare graduates to do the following:

  • Explain the form and function of the human body.
  • Explain various factors that make up holistic human health and wellness.
  • Identify their strengths and interests and demonstrate how these can be used to serve humanity.
  • Demonstrate appropriate strategies to communicate health and wellness concepts.
  • Demonstrate critical-thinking skills and the ability to access and evaluate health information and resources.
  • Articulate a worldview that integrates professional ethics with cultural competence and personal values.

Athletic Training Courses

AT 170 Advanced CPR and First Aid1
This course provides a comprehensive survey of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid, focusing especially on situations likely to be encountered by professionals in health science and kinesiology. The intention is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to work in an emergency to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical help can arrive. Leads to certification at the healthcare provider level.
AT 270 Emergency Response2
First-aid and safety procedures. Emergency response and CPR certificates from the Red Cross awarded to those who qualify. Lab required.
AT 271 Introduction to Athletic Training2
Survey of the profession of athletic training. Injury prevention, assessment, treatment, taping and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries will be presented. Lab required. Spring semester.
AT 271L Lab: Introduction to Athletic Training0
AT 283 Clinical Experience I2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 284 Clinical Experience II2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 332 Pathophysiology and Modalities in Athletic Training3
This course will address the effective application of therapeutic modalities in order to facilitate the healing and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Content includes the pathology of athletic injury to various body tissues, the healing response, and the physiological effect of therapeutic modalities commonly used in sports medicine. Prerequisite: HS 220. Co-requisite: AT 332L, lab required.
AT 332L Lab: Pathophysiology & Modalities0
AT 333 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training3
This course is designed to expose students to the organization and administration concepts of athletic training. Content includes management, leadership, legalities, historical perspectives, motivation and technology. Prerequisite: AT 334. Also listed as LS 332. Spring semester.
AT 334 Physical Examination of the Lower Extremities in Athletic Training4
Intense in-depth study of the lower extremities including physical examinations, injury recognition, treatment, taping, bracing, and care. Laboratory experiences emphasize the methods and techniques in evaluating lower extremity injuries/conditions. Prerequisite: HS 220 & HS 221. Lab required.
AT 334L Lab: Lower Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 335 Physical Examination of the Upper Extremities in Athletic Training4
This course is an intense in-depth study of the upper extremities including physical examinations, injury recognition, treatment, taping, bracing, and care. Laboratory experiences emphasize the methods and techniques in evaluating upper extremity injuries/conditions. Prerequisite: AT 334. Lab required.
AT 335L Lab: Upper Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 336 Medical Issues in Athletic Training3
This course addresses current medical issues that pertain to athletic training. Content includes sports pharmacology, physiological considerations, common illnesses and special concerns. Lab required. Spring semester. Prequisite or corequisite HS-221.
AT 338 Sports Medicine Study Program: Preparation1
This preparatory course is designed to equip students for participation in the AT 339 Seminar in Sports Medicine: Japan program. Content includes basic language instruction, cultural nuances, healthcare differences and Japanese religions. Spring semester, odd years.
AT 339 Seminar in Sports Medicine: Japan1-3
Comparative analysis of Eastern and Western philosophies of athletic health care. Conducted at various locations in Japan. May Term, odd years. Prerequisite: AT 338.
AT 383 Clinical Experience III2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 384 Clinical Experience IV2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 432 Therapeutic Exercise3
Instruction on the effective application of therapeutic exercise in order to achieve symptom-free movement and function. Content includes basic principles of exercise, therapeutic effects of exercise, functional evaluation of performance, goniometric measurements and manual muscle testing. Prerequisite: AT-334. Lab required. Fall semester.
AT 483 Clinical Experience V2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 484 Clinical Experience VI2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 498 Capstone in Athletic Training1
This capstone experience is designed to prepare athletic training students for the BOC examination, graduate school and entry-level employment in athletic training. The course will include engagement with current professional issues and reflection on professional philosophy. Prerequisite: AT-483.

Health Science Courses

HS 179 Foundations of Health Sciences3
Foundations of the Health Sciences introduce students to the exploration of careers in the Health Sciences. Through self-evaluation, and critical analysis, students will be introduced to a variety of Health Science related professions. This introductory course is designed for 1st and 2nd year students and is offered each Jan Term.
HS 185 Medical & Anat. Terminology2
Designed to help students understand health care related language, and prepare for HS 220 and HS 221. Medical terms, abbreviations, prefixes, suffixes, and root words will be examined as they related to body systems, medical disorders, and health care. Summer.
HS 220 Anatomy and Physiology I4
Gross anatomy and physiological applications of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and nervous systems of the human body. Emphasis given to the relationship of major organs to health and disease. Lab component provides practical application in the location and isolation of anatomical parts. Designed for students in nursing, athletic training, and kinesiology as well as other allied health programs. Lab required. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Fall semester. Lab fee.
HS 220L Lab: Anatomy and Physiology I0
HS 221 Anatomy and Physiology II4
Gross anatomy and physiological applications of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Emphasis given to the relationship of major organs to health and disease. Lab component provides practical application in the location and isolation of anatomical parts and physiological assessments. Designed for students in nursing, athletic training, and kinesiology as well as other allied health programs. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220. Spring semester. Lab fee.
HS 221L Lab: Anatomy and Physiology II0
HS 261 Community Health3
This course will explore foundations of community health, our nation's health status, health disparities, social determinants of health, and local and national health agendas. Specific emphasis is placed on social, behavioral, and environmental community health-related issues and the controversies that surround them. Group and presentation work will be included in the course. Class discussions and written reports will examine the complexity of the relationship between the natural environment, the built environment, and health outcomes. Fall and spring semesters. Jan Term.
HS 301 Introduction to Healthcare Administratio3
Introduction to Healthcare Administration This course provides an introduction to the structure, operation and financing of the American healthcare system. It examines the major industry participants; how healthcare services are allocated and financed; the factors that influence the cost and quality of care; and opposing positions on the future of healthcare reform.
HS 315 Nutrition3
Consideration of nutrients and their functions in the body. Discussion of nutrition and health, clinical applications of nutrition, facts and fallacies about diet. Prerequisites: CH 101 or CH 161. Fall and spring semester, Jan Term.
HS 320 Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
A study of human motion, emphasizing analysis of joint and muscular action and the application of biomechanical principles for sport skills common to physical education and athletics. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220 and HS 221. Fall and spring semester.
HS 326 Exercise Physiology4
The study of theory and practical application of exercise as it applies to the human body. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220 and HS 221. Fall semester.
HS 326L Exercise Physiology Lab0
HS 335 Clinical Anatomy and Orthopedic Evaluation3
This course will be an in-depth study of the upper and lower extremities including clinical anatomy, physical examinations, and basic injury recognition. Class will be a combined lecture/lab format, and experiences will emphasize recognition and palpation of bony and soft tissue landmarks, the methods and techniques in evaluating orthopedic injuries/conditions, and a discussion of injury/dysfunction implications. Prerequisite: HS-220 & HS-221.
HS 355 Training Theory & Program Design3
In this course, students will learn more complex principles and applications of exercise training theory and program design, including needs assessments, periodization, evidence-based practice, and current trends in the field.
HS 362 Personal Health3
In this course students will investigate and discuss current issues related to personal health and holistic wellness. Topics include: health in our society, chronic diseases, mental health and stress, spirituality, sleep, nutrition, fitness, body weight and composition, body image, substance abuse, relationships, violence, social health and justice, and health policy. Fall and spring semesters.
HS 363 Personal Health and Nutrition3
This course will investigate current issues related to personal health and holistic wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on nutrition for kinesiology and athletic training majors. Required for Kinesiology and Athletic Training Majors only. Fall Term.
HS 365W Evidence Based Health Science3
An exploration of research methods, critical appraisal, and the use of evidence to guide practice in a variety of health-related fields. Students will learn to formulate a clear clinical question based on personal area of interest, conduct a relevant literature review, and be able to synthesize the evidence to determine best practice. Prerequisite: HS 326. Spring semester.
HS 372 Global Medicine3
This course focuses on three overarching topics: (a) cultural competency in the provision of healthcare services, (b) analysis of global healthcare systems and selected global health concerns, and (c) international health volunteerism. Through study and practical experience, this class aims to equip students to critically analyze public or private health delivery organizations, acknowledge the need for provision of culturally competent healthcare, and appreciate how regional society (history, culture, politics, etc.) influence health.
HS 376 Health Psychology3
The study of biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives influence an individual's overall health including; behavior change theory and application, coping and stress management, psychoneuroimmunology, the impact of personality and cognitive patterns, vision and goal development to facilitate health behavior change. Cross-listed: PY 376. Prerequisite: PY 101 and junior status. Fall semester.
HS 385 Sexuality and Society3
This course focuses on issues surrounding the mental-emotional, physical, and social aspects of human sexuality. Key course content areas include: communication, sexual anatomy, reproduction and reproductive technology, sexual consent and coercion, and decision making regarding sexual behavior.
HS 387 Drugs and Society3
The course focuses on drug use and abuse from a biopsychosocial perspective. Specifically, the course explores the health related consequences of drug use, the historical aspects surrounding use and abuse, and issues and solutions in treatment and enforcement.
HS 390 Internship1-6
HS 410 Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
Survey of major chronic diseases, risk factors, epidemiology, and various public health approaches (e.g. nutrition, physical activity, behavioral interventions and alternative therapies). Conditions include: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease, lung diseases, neurologic disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, and metabolic syndrome. Prerequisites: HS 326, HS 361 and HS 362.
HS 420 Evidence Based Health Education3
This course will focus on selected topics within health education and promotion. Using leading health indicators, we will explore philosophies and theories to provide a framework and foundation for understanding the practice and research of health education and promotion. Fall semester.
HS 433 Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
Development of proficiency in the theory, design, and implementation of conditioning programs. Instruction will include nutritional consideration and ergogenic aids for physical conditioning. Prerequisite: HS 320 and HS 326. Fall and spring semesters. Instructor consent required.
HS 450 Health Policy and Management3
This course will explore health policy issues confronting public health. It will review the processes that influence development and implementation of health policies, roles of health service organizations, agencies associated with public health, and current public health trends. Fall semester.
HS 475W Health Promotion Planning Implementation And Evaluation3
This course will enable students to create a detailed and effective health promotion program using evidence-based program design. It will allow students to bridge health content knowledge with behavior change theory and application. Emphasis will be placed on developing and understanding: needs assessment, program rationale, mission statements, goals and objectives, implementation plans, and evaluation protocols. Prerequisite: HS-361 and HS-362. Spring semester.
HS 490 Internship1-6
HS 498 Senior Seminar3
Exploration of issues and mechanisms of health professional accountability, a humanistic basis of healthcare, cultural competence, social justice issues in healthcare, basic health policy principles, principles that guide ethical decision-making, patient rights, and healthcare professional duties. Senior standing. Fall and spring semesters.

Requirements for a Health Science Major, B.S. and B.A. (59)

Major Core Courses
BI 140General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution4
CH 161General Chemistry I3
or CH 101 Introduction to Chemistry
CH 161LGeneral Chemistry I Lab1
or CH 101L Introduction to Chemistry Lab
CH 181General Chemistry II3
or CH 102 Bioorganic Chemistry
CH 181LGeneral Chemistry II Lab1
or CH 102L Bioorganic Chemistry Lab
HS 179Foundations of Health Sciences3
HS 220Anatomy and Physiology I4
HS 221Anatomy and Physiology II4
HS 261Community Health3
HS 315Nutrition3
HS 320Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
HS 326Exercise Physiology4
HS 326LExercise Physiology Lab0
HS 362Personal Health3
HS 365WEvidence Based Health Science3
HS 498Senior Seminar3
One credit of internship is required (390 or 490)1
Internship
Internship
Students must take a minimum of twelve credits from major electives12

Major Electives

  • Classes identified in the catalog as recommended for “Preparation for Health Professions” may also qualify as major electives
  • Courses should be selected in consultation with advisor, and based on post-graduate goals

Electives for B.S. in Health Science (must take a minimum of 12 credits)

BI 141General Biology II: Organismal Biology4
BI 141LGeneral Biology II: Organismal Biology Lab0
BI 204Medical Microbiology4
BI 311General Biochemistry3
BI 350Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy4
BI 350LLab: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy0
BI 363Genetics4
CH 271Organic Chemistry I3
CH 271LOrganic Chemistry I Lab1
CH 278Organic Chemistry II3
CH 278LOrganic Chemistry II Lab1
CH 401Biochemistry I3
CH 401LBiochemistry I Lab1
CH 403Biochemistry II3
AT 332Pathophysiology and Modalities in Athletic Training3
AT 332LLab: Pathophysiology & Modalities0
AT 334Physical Examination of the Lower Extremities in Athletic Training4
AT 334LLab: Lower Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 335Physical Examination of the Upper Extremities in Athletic Training4
AT 335LLab: Upper Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 336Medical Issues in Athletic Training3
AT 432Therapeutic Exercise3
HS 390Internship (1-3 credits)1-3
HS 410Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
HS 490Internship (1-3 credits)1-3

Electives for B.A. in Health Science (must take a minimum of 12 credits)

PY 210Developmental Psychology3
PY 236Biological Psychology3
PY 357Developmental Psychopathology3
PY 358Psychopathology3
SO 271Introduction to Social Welfare3
SO 275Population Analysis3
SO 368The Helping Process in Social Services3
HS 390Internship (1-3 credits)1-3
HS 410Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
HS 420Evidence Based Health Education3
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
HS 450Health Policy and Management3
HS 475WHealth Promotion Planning Implementation And Evaluation3
HS 490Internship (1-3 credits)1-3

Community Health

The Community Health major is designed to prepare students to think critically, communicate effectively, and solve complex problems related to the health of communities.  Grounded in evidence-based thinking and social justice, majors will: assess individual and community needs and resources; plan, implement, and evaluate effective health education programs; coordinate the provision of health education services; and advocate for the health of all people. 

Requirements for a Community Health Major, B.A. (51)

HS 179Foundations of Health Sciences3
HS 220Anatomy and Physiology I4
HS 220LLab: Anatomy and Physiology I0
HS 221Anatomy and Physiology II4
HS 221LLab: Anatomy and Physiology II0
HS 261Community Health3
HS 363Personal Health and Nutrition3
HS 385Sexuality and Society3
HS 387Drugs and Society3
HS 410Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
HS 450Health Policy and Management3
HS 475WHealth Promotion Planning Implementation And Evaluation3
HS 490Internship4
HS 498Senior Seminar3
One of the following:3
Elementary Probability and Statistics
Interdisciplinary Introduction to Stats
Community Health Electives (must take a minimum of 9 credits)9
Developmental Psychology
Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology Lab
Psychology of Poverty and Social Class
Health Psychology
Psychopathology
Introduction to Social Welfare
The Helping Process in Social Services
Emergency Response

B.S. in Health Science, Pre-Athletic Training track

The B.S. in Health Science, pre-athletic training track, is designed for individuals interested in pursuing a Master’s degree in Athletic Training (either at Whitworth or at another institution).  This pre-athletic training track integrates all pre-requisite courses for Whitworth’s Master of Science in Athletic Training (see more information at http://www.whitworth.edu/athletictraining/).  An additional pre-athletic training track is offered through the Kinesiology department.

Mission statement

The mission of the Athletic Training Program at Whitworth University is to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become proficient and professional entry-level athletic trainers. This is accomplished through high quality instruction and experiences that model ethical practice, effective communication and compassion. The program utilizes a holistic approach in developing multi-dimensional healthcare professionals and servant-leaders within the context of a Christian liberal-arts environment.

Requirements for B.S. in Health Science, pre-athletic training track (61-62)

BI 140General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution4
CH 101Introduction to Chemistry3
or CH 161 General Chemistry I
CH 101LIntroduction to Chemistry Lab1
or CH 161L General Chemistry I Lab
HS 179Foundations of Health Sciences3
HS 220Anatomy and Physiology I4
HS 221Anatomy and Physiology II4
HS 261Community Health3
HS 320Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
HS 326Exercise Physiology4
HS 326LExercise Physiology Lab0
HS 363Personal Health and Nutrition3
HS 365WEvidence Based Health Science3
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
One of the following:1-2
Advanced CPR and First Aid
Emergency Response
AT 271Introduction to Athletic Training2
HS 390Internship (In Athletic Training)1
PY 101Introductory Psychology3
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
Major Electives12

A pre-athletic training major is also available through the Kinesiology department

Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Chair

MIKE EDIGER

Director of Athletic Training

CYNTHIA WRIGHT

Associate professors

MIKE EDIGERDAMAN HAGEROTTROBIN PICKERING

Assistant professors

ELIZABETH ABBEYJONATHAN HUWESTACEY NAUMANW. MATT SILVERSSHANE WIBELCYNTHIA WRIGHT

Lecturer

JUSTIN ULBRIGHT

Whitworth Nursing Advisor

MIKE EDIGER