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Health Sciences

http://www.whitworth.edu/healthscience

The Whitworth Health Sciences Department offers majors in health science (for both a B.S. and a B.A.), athletic training, and nursing.

Health SciencesThe mission of the Whitworth Health Sciences Department is to equip its graduates to serve humanity through study of the form and function of the human body and the body’s connection to health and wellness. Through a curriculum that integrates theory and practice, graduates will be able to  appreciate this relationship both critically and creatively and will learn to apply it to various health-related fields.

The learning outcomes of this major prepare graduates to:

  • identify their gifts and interests and learn how these can be used to serve humanity and the greater good of the communities in which we live;
  • begin to understand and appreciate the human body’s relationship to health and wellness through science, theory and application;
  • demonstrate communication skills necessary to teach others effectively and accurately about human health and wellness in a variety of organizational and institutional settings;
  • demonstrate critical-thinking skills and the ability to access and evaluate relevant health information and resources;
  • demonstrate the interpersonal skills required to work cooperatively with individuals and groups on issues related to the human condition;
  • begin to understand cultural, ethical and professional considerations related to health and wellness;
  • develop a worldview that integrates students’ spiritual and ethical values with their vocational calling;
  • experience a health-related internship that clarifies career goals and provides practical preparation for students’ careers.

Requirements for a Health Science Major, B.S. and B.A. (61)

Major Core Courses
BI 140General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution4
BI 204Medical Microbiology (lab not required)3
CH 161General Chemistry I3
or CH 101 Introduction to Chemistry
CH 161LGeneral Chemistry I Lab1
or CH 101L Introduction to Chemistry Lab
CH 181General Chemistry II3
or CH 102 Bioorganic Chemistry
CH 181LGeneral Chemistry II Lab1
or CH 102L Bioorganic Chemistry Lab
HS 179Foundations of Health Sciences3
HS 220Anatomy and Physiology I4
HS 221Anatomy and Physiology II4
HS 315Nutrition3
HS 320Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
HS 326Exercise Physiology3
HS 361Community Health3
HS 362Personal Health3
HS 365WEvidence Based Health Science3
HS 498Senior Seminar3
One credit of internship is required (390 or 490)1
Internship
Internship
Students must take a minimum of twelve credits from major electives12

Major Electives

  • Classes identified in the catalog as recommended for “Preparation for Health Professions” may also qualify as major electives
  • Courses should be selected in consultation with advisor, and based on post-graduate goals

Electives for B.S. in Health Science (must take a minimum of 12 credits)

BI 141General Biology II: Organismal Biology4
BI 141LGeneral Biology II: Organismal Biology Lab0
BI 230Introductory Biochemistry3
BI 350Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy4
BI 350LLab: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy0
BI 363Genetics4
CH 271Organic Chemistry I3
CH 271LOrganic Chemistry I Lab1
CH 278Organic Chemistry II3
CH 278LOrganic Chemistry II Lab1
CH 401Biochemistry I3
CH 401LBiochemistry I Lab1
CH 403Biochemistry II3
AT 332Pathophysiology and Modalities in Athletic Training2
AT 332LLab: Pathophysiology & Modalities0
AT 334Physical Examination of the Lower Extremities in Athletic Training3
AT 334LLab: Lower Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 335Physical Examination of the Upper Extremities in Athletic Training3
AT 335LLab: Upper Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 336Medical Issues in Athletic Training3
AT 432Therapeutic Exercise2
HS 390Internship (1-3 credits)1-3
HS 410Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
HS 490Internship (1-3 credits)1-3

Electives for B.A. in Health Science (must take a minimum of 12 credits)

PY 210Developmental Psychology3
PY 236Biological Psychology3
PY 357Developmental Psychopathology3
PY 358Psychopathology3
SO 271Introduction to Social Welfare3
SO 275Population, Environment and Society3
SO 368The Helping Process in Social Services3
HS 370Biostatistics and Epidemiology3
HS 390Internship (1-3 credits)1-3
HS 410Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
HS 420Health Promotion and Education3
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
HS 450Health Policy and Management3
HS 490Internship (1-3 credits)1-3

Athletic Training Education

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Athletic Training Education Program at Whitworth University is to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become proficient and professional entry-level athletic trainers. This is accomplished through high quality instruction and experiences that model ethical practice, effective communication and compassion. The program utilizes a holistic approach in developing multi-dimensional healthcare professionals and servant-leaders within the context of a Christian liberal-arts environment.

EXPECTED STUDENT OUTCOMES

 
Graduates of the Whitworth University athletic training program will:

1. Understand the role of an athletic trainer as a health care provider within the larger context of the continually evolving health care system.
  a) Work in collaboration with other health care providers  
  b) Communicate effectively with all those involved in health care of the patient, both in oral and       written form
  c) Recognize when referral of a patient to another health care provider is warranted and                 facilitate that referral
2. Incorporate ethical, moral and legal behavior into the practice of athletic training.
  a) Abide by the Standards of Practice established by the Board of Certification
  b) Abide by the NATA Code of Ethics
3. Appreciate the value and nature of incorporating personal faith into vocational practice.
4. Develop competence in evidence-based clinical practice.
  a) Establish habits that will result in life-long learning and professional development
  b) Recognize quality evidence from a variety of sources and incorporate into practice
  c) Recognize unknown areas as problem-solving opportunities and engage in critical analysis in       attempt to provide solutions
5. Demonstrating contemporary knowledge and skill in the comprehensive examination, assessment, management and rehabilitation of patients with injuries.
6. Demonstrate contemporary knowledge and skill in the comprehensive examination, assessment, management and treatment of patients with illnesses as they pertain to an active lifestyle.
7. Achieve 100% ultimate pass rate on the BOC exam for those who continue to attempt it.
8. Invest in and promote the profession of athletic training or other chosen vocation
  a) Remain members of the NATA or respective professional guild
  b) Advocating for changes in laws, regulations, standards and guidelines that affect athletic             training and/or respected vocation
9. Support their professional community by assuming a service and/or leadership role in an area that impacts the practice of athletic training or respective vocation.

EXPECTED FACULTY OUTCOMES

 
Faculty of the Whitworth University athletic training program will:

1. Abide by the Standards of Practice established by the Board of Certification
2. Abide by the NATA Code of Ethics
3. Integrate their Christian faith to their teaching and practice of athletic training.
4. Maintain an ongoing commitment to evidence based practice in teaching, clinical practice, service and scholarship.
5. Maintain active Washington licensure and membership in the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.
6. Assume a service and/or leadership role in an area that impacts the practice of athletic training. 

 

Requirements for Athletic Training Major, B.S. (56)

This is a limited-enrollment major. Applicants for admission to the athletic training major are evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Current enrollment or completion of AT 270 and 271 with a grade of "B" or higher
  2. Demonstration of professional decorum and dispositions
  3. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 at Whitworth University for full admission. Applicants with a GPA less than 2.75 but above 2.5 may be admitted conditionally. Transfer students must meet GPA requirements at Whitworth.
  4. A completed application form and two written recommendations
  5. A written essay providing the requested information
  6. Submission of completed immunization records prior to engaging in patient-care activities 
  7. Completion of the Technical Standards form that can be obtained at www.whitworth.edu/athletictraining  and in the Athletic Training Student Policy and Procedure Manual
  8. Copies of CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and First Aid certification cards (or current enrollment in AT 270)
  9. No grade below "C" in any course in the athletic training major
  10. Commitment to six semesters of didactic and clinical education
  11. Possible personal interview

Athletic Training, B.S. (56)

Prerequisites prior to admission to the program:
AT 270Emergency Response2
AT 271Introduction to Athletic Training2
Courses to be completed after admission to athletic training major:
HS 220Anatomy and Physiology I4
HS 221Anatomy and Physiology II4
HS 320Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
HS 326Exercise Physiology3
AT 332Pathophysiology and Modalities in Athletic Training2
AT 333Organization and Administration of Athletic Training3
AT 334Physical Examination of the Lower Extremities in Athletic Training3
AT 335Physical Examination of the Upper Extremities in Athletic Training3
AT 336Medical Issues in Athletic Training3
HS 363Personal Health and Nutrition3
HS 365WEvidence Based Health Science3
AT 432Therapeutic Exercise2
HS 433Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
Twelve credits of Clinical Experience12
Clinical Experience I
Clinical Experience II
Clinical Experience III
Clinical Experience IV
Clinical Experience V
Clinical Experience VI
Recommended:
Sports Medicine Study Program: Preparation
Seminar in Sports Medicine: Japan
Topics: Athletic Training

A grade of “C” or higher in all major required courses is required for athletic training majors

Athletic Training Courses

AT 192 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
AT 270 Emergency Response2
First-aid and safety procedures. Emergency response and CPR certificates from the Red Cross awarded to those who qualify. Lab required.
AT 271 Introduction to Athletic Training2
Survey of the profession of athletic training. Injury prevention, assessment, treatment, taping and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries will be presented. Lab required. Spring semester.
AT 271L Lab: Introduction to Athletic Training0
AT 283 Clinical Experience I2
Clinical experience in athletic training
AT 284 Clinical Experience II2
Clinical experience in athletic training
AT 291 Independent Study1-4
AT 332 Pathophysiology and Modalities in Athletic Training2
Analysis of the physiological response to injury and the effects of therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation on damaged tissues. Prerequisites: AT 270, AT 271 and HS 220. Lab required.
AT 332L Lab: Pathophysiology & Modalities0
AT 333 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training3
This course is designed to expose students to the organization and administration concepts of athletic training. Content includes management, leadership, legalities, historical perspectives, motivation and technology. Spring semester. Prerequisite: AT 334.
AT 334 Physical Examination of the Lower Extremities in Athletic Training3
Intense in-depth study of the lower extremities including physical examinations, injury recognition, treatment, taping, bracing, and rehabilitation. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220 & HS 221.
AT 334L Lab: Lower Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 335 Physical Examination of the Upper Extremities in Athletic Training3
Intense in-depth study of the trunk, head, face and upper extremities, including physical examinations, injury recognition, emergency treatment, taping, bracing and rehabilitation. Lab required. Prerequisite: AT 334.
AT 335L Lab: Upper Extremities in Athletic Training0
AT 336 Medical Issues in Athletic Training3
This course addresses current medical issues that pertain to athletic training. Content includes sports pharmacology, physiological considerations, common illnesses and special concerns. Lab required. Spring semester.
AT 338 Sports Medicine Study Program: Preparation1
This preparatory course is designed to equip students for participation in the AT 339 Seminar in Sports Medicine: Japan program. Content includes basic language instruction, cultural nuances, healthcare differences and Japanese religions. Spring semester, odd years.
AT 339 Seminar in Sports Medicine: Japan1-3
Comparative analysis of Eastern and Western philosophies of athletic health care. Conducted at various locations in Japan. May Term, odd years. Prerequisite: AT 338.
AT 383 Clinical Experience III2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 384 Clinical Experience IV2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 391 Independent Study1-4
AT 392 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
AT 395 Teaching Assistant1-3
AT 396 Topics: Athletic Training1-3
AT 432 Therapeutic Exercise2
Instruction on the effective application of therapeutic exercise in order to achieve symptom-free movement and function. Content includes basic principles of exercise, therapeutic effects of exercise, functional evaluation of performance, goniometric measurements and manual muscle testing. Lab required. Fall semester.
AT 483 Clinical Experience V2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 484 Clinical Experience VI2
Clinical experience in athletic training.
AT 490 Internship1-4
AT 491 Independent Study1-4
AT 495 Teaching Assistant1-3

Health Science Courses

HS 179 Foundations of Health Sciences3
Foundations of the Health Sciences introduce students to the exploration of careers in the Health Sciences. Through self-evaluation, and critical analysis, students will be introduced to a variety of Health Science related professions. This introductory course is designed for 1st and 2nd year students and is offered each Jan Term.
HS 185 Medical & Anat. Terminology2
Designed to help students understand health care related language, and prepare for HS 220 & HS 221. Medical terms, abbreviations, prefixes, suffixes, and root words will be examined as they related to body systems, medical disorders, and health care. Summer.
HS 192 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
HS 196 Topics in Health Science1-4
Selected upper-division topics in health science.
HS 220 Anatomy and Physiology I4
Gross anatomy and physiological applications of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and nervous systems of the human body. Emphasis given to the relationship of major organs to health and disease. Lab component provides practical application in the location and isolation of anatomical parts. Designed for students in nursing, athletic training, and kinesiology as well as other allied health programs. Lab required. Lab fee. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Fall semester.
HS 220L Lab: Anatomy and Physiology I0
HS 221 Anatomy and Physiology II4
Gross anatomy and physiological applications of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Emphasis given to the relationship of major organs to health and disease. Lab component provides practical application in the location and isolation of anatomical parts and physiological assessments. Designed for students in nursing, athletic training, and kinesiology as well as other allied health programs. Lab required. Lab fee. Prerequisite: HS 220. Spring semester.
HS 221L Lab: Anatomy and Physiology II0
HS 290 Internship1-4
HS 315 Nutrition3
Consideration of nutrients and their functions in the body. Discussion of nutrition and health, clinical applications of nutrition, facts and fallacies about diet. Prerequisite: CH 101 or CH 161. Fall semester, Jan Term.
HS 320 Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology4
A study of human motion, emphasizing analysis of joint and muscular action and the application of biomechanical principles for sport skills common to physical education and athletics. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220 and HS 221. Fall and spring semester.
HS 326 Exercise Physiology3
The study of theory and practical application of exercise as it applies to the human body. Lab required. Prerequisite: HS 220 and HS 221. Fall semester.
HS 326L Exercise Physiology Lab0
HS 361 Community Health3
Current issues in health, including the health care system and wellness and illness. Fall and spring semester.
HS 362 Personal Health3
Current issues related to substance use and abuse, sexuality and life cycles. Fall and spring semester.
HS 363 Personal Health and Nutrition3
This course will investigate current issues related to personal health and holistic wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on nutrition for kinesiology and athletic training majors. Required for Kinesiology and Athletic Training Majors only. Fall Term.
HS 365W Evidence Based Health Science3
An exploration of research methods, critical appraisal, and the use of evidence to guide practice in a variety of health-related fields. Students will learn to formulate a clear clinical question based on personal area of interest, conduct a relevant literature review, and be able to synthesize the evidence to determine best practice. Prerequisite: HS 326. Spring semester.
HS 370 Biostatistics and Epidemiology3
This course will explore the foundations of biostatistics and epidemiology in society through the study of patterns, causes and effects, and the application of statistics as they relate to health and disease in health sciences and society. Fall Term.
HS 390 Internship1-4
HS 391 Independent Study1-4
HS 392 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
HS 395 Teaching Assistantship1-4
HS 396 Topics in Health Science1-4
Selected upper-division topics in health science.
HS 410 Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention3
Survey of major chronic diseases, risk factors, epidemiology, and various public health approaches (e.g. nutrition, physical activity, behavioral interventions and alternative therapies). Conditions include: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease, lung diseases, neurologic disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, and metabolic syndrome. Prerequisites: HS 326, HS 361 and HS 362.
HS 420 Health Promotion and Education3
This course will focus on selected topics within health education and promotion. Using leading health indicators, we will explore philosophies and theories to provide a framework and foundation for understanding the practice and research of health education and promotion.
HS 433 Principles of Conditioning and Nutrition3
Development of proficiency in the theory, design, and implementation of conditioning programs. Instruction will include nutritional consideration and ergogenic aids for physical conditioning. Prerequisite: HS 320 and HS 326. Fall and spring semesters.
HS 450 Health Policy and Management3
This course will explore health policy issues confronting public health. It will review the processes that influence development and implementation of health policies, roles of health service organizations, agencies associated with public health, and current public health trends.
HS 490 Internship1-4
HS 491 Independent Study1-4
HS 495 Teaching Assistantship1-4
HS 498 Senior Seminar3
Exploration of issues and mechanisms of health professional accountability, a humanistic basis of healthcare, cultural competence, social justice issues in healthcare, basic health policy principles, principles that guide ethical decision-making, patient rights, and healthcare professional duties. Senior standing. Fall and spring semesters.
Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Chair

MIKE EDIGER

Associate professors

MIKE EDIGERDAMAN HAGEROTTMELINDA LARSONROBIN PICKERING

Assistant professors

W. MATT SILVERSCYNTHIA WRIGHTELIZABETH ABBEYSHANE WIBEL

Lecturer

JUSTIN ULBRIGHT

Whitworth Nursing Advisor

MIKE EDIGER