English

http://www.whitworth.edu/english

English

English majors may choose one of three approaches to the major, based on their interests and career goals: literature (Track I), writing (Track II), or preparation for secondary teaching (Track III). All English majors, regardless of their chosen track, take foundational courses in literature and critical theory.

The department also offers four minors: a general English minor, an English/language arts minor for education students, a film and visual narrative minor, and a medieval and early modern studies minor.

The department aims to help all of our students become careful and insightful readers, judicious and flexible researchers, and clear, imaginative writers. We hope to pass on to our students our own love of reading, writing, language, and storytelling in all forms. Through our courses, research, and shared community events, we hope to encourage our students in lives of spiritual commitment and resolution to act as stewards of God’s creation while promoting civil and personal justice at home and in the community.

The English major prepares students as follows:

  1. At the completion of their lower-division coursework, all English majors (Tracks I, II, and III) should have acquired a command of foundational literary terminology; a basis for understanding the themes and histories of British, American, and world literatures; the ability to craft critical readings responding to a variety of literary genres; and experience writing in different genres.

  2. By the time they graduate, students completing Tracks I and II (literature and writing) will also exhibit more advanced literary skills, including improved aesthetic discernment; oral interpretation and presentation skills; enlarged literary and personal vocabulary; critical reading, thinking, and writing skills; facility with several critical approaches to literary analysis; and a command of research methods, bibliographic resources, and documentation.

  3. At the completion of their upper-division work for Tracks I and II (literature and writing), students should demonstrate in-depth knowledge of several literary eras as well as the major writers and works of those eras; an ability to write a variety of literary analyses and genres; and competence working with other students’ editing and revising their own writing.

  4. At the completion of their upper-division work, Track III (teaching) students should have gained the specialized knowledge expected of secondary teachers of English and language arts, and they should be able to fulfill the state-mandated requirements for endorsement in language arts or another related field, as set forth in the current catalog.

English Courses

EL 100 Research & Writing Workshop3
Workshop format. Particular attention given to individual writing process. Focus will be on a full range of academic writing skills; projects include narratives, essays and culminate in a final research paper. Periodic offering in evening/accelerated program.
EL 101 Writing Wksp: Polishing Prose1
This one credit writing course will focus on detailed development of various writing modalities including audience awareness, document design and formatting, tone, accuracy, and writing style. Students will have the opportunity to develop and enhance their writing skills in an interactive workshop format. This course may be taken twice.
EL 102 Writing Wksp: Struc. Engl Grmr1
Structure of English, Grammar & Effective Writing Focus on the structure and rules of standard English and their relationship to effective writing. Students will have both in-class and assigned writing opportunities to practice skills such as active voice, parallel structures, point of view and more.
EL 109 Introduction to Academic Writing3
Introduction to critical writing in response to reading and research. Practice in using writing processes (invention, drafting, revision, editing) to create effective academic arguments. Style and grammar issues and strategies for avoiding plagiarism presented as needed. Offered in the continuing-studies program only.
EL 110 Writing I3
An introduction to academic writing and research. Emphasis on revision and adaptation of writing for appropriate audiences. Practice in analyzing, synthesizing, and responding to academic readings focused on a topic. Workshop and discussion format. Does not count toward English majors or minors. Also listed as ENS 110. Fall and spring semesters.
EL 110H Honors Writing I: Writing in the World3
An introduction to academic writing and research, with an emphasis on writing for real-world contexts and multimodal composition. Workshop and discussion format. For honors students or students with advanced placement.
EL 115H Reading in Action3
This freshman level honors course explores a variety of reading practices beginning with our initial love of literature, moving into advanced scholarly reading, and engaging in service-learning with reading communities in Spokane.
EL 124 African American Literature3
Introduction to literary study through African American literature. Covers poetry, fiction, and drama. May also consider sermons, songs, and film by African Americans.
EL 125 Reading Literature3
Introduction to literary genres: fiction, drama, and poetry. Attention to multicultural literature. Periodic offering.
EL 126 Women Writers3
An overview of women's literary history and an introduction to feminist literary theory. Emphasis on reading, discussion and student response through written and oral assignments. Readings include poetry, fiction, and drama. Also listed as WGS 126.
EL 127 African American Women Writers3
Survey of the literature and cultural histories of African American women writers of various genres, along with a selection of black feminist scholarship and critical race theory. Elective for women's and gender studies minor and United States cultural studies minor. Also listed as WGS 127.
EL 128 Multicultural American Literature3
Survey of African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American literature. Readings in prose, poetry, drama, and film from at least two of the groups.
EL 130 Latina & Caribbean Women Writers3
Study of contemporary novels, stories, poems, and films produced by Latina and Caribbean American women in light of historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on reading and student response through written and oral assignments produced both individually and collaboratively. Also listed as EL 330, WGS 130/330. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 131 Native American Literature3
Emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1965, with a look at autobiographies of 19th-century Crow man and woman, three Native-made / starring / themed movies, and footage of contemporary pow-wow dancing. N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Linda Hogan, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, and others.
EL 132 American Immigrant Literature3
Explores the American immigrant experience through stories, journals, poems, and plays written by explorers, colonists, and immigrants from the time of Columbus to the present. A multicultural introduction to the major genres (fiction, poetry, drama).
EL 136 Asian American Literature3
Asian American poetry, prose, and plays, along with Asian American history.
EL 202 Classic American Films1
Seven American films, from the 1940s through the 1980s, introducing students to important American classics. Attendance & participation required. Meets every other week. Four short papers. 1 credit. Also listed as FVNS 202. Spring semester.
EL 204 Film Noir Hardboiled Lit3
An introduction to major hardboiled fiction authors (Hammett, Chandler, Cain, Highsmith) and classic films noir (e.g., The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity). We will analyze these genres in their historical and ideological contexts, examining post-war paranoia, existentialism, literary modernism, etc. Also listed as FVNS 204. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 205 American Literature Before 18653
Overview of major periods, authors and representative works of American literature from the earliest writers through the Civil War. Preparation for upper division. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested. Fall semester.
EL 206 American Literature After 18653
Overview of major periods, authors and representative works of American literature from end of the Civil War to present. Preparation for upper division. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested. EL 206 may be taken before EL 205. Spring semester.
EL 207 British Literature Before 18003
British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Renaissance and 18th century. Major period characteristics, authors and representative works. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested. Also listed as EMS 207. Fall semester.
EL 208 British Literature Since 18003
British literature from the Romantic period through the 20th century. Major period characteristics, authors and representative works. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested. EL 208 may be taken before EL 207. Spring semester.
EL 209 Latin American Literature in English3
Study of contemporary novels, stories, poems, essays and films from Latin America, with special focus on Costa Rica. Works considered in light of historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on reading, discussion, and a range of writing assignments, from creative and reflective pieces to analysis and application of critical theory. Also listed as LAS 209.
EL 210 Writing II3
Advanced study and production of critical writing and research with an emphasis placed on the rhetorical analysis and composition of digital texts in a variety of modes. This course focuses on interpretation and production of argumentative writing for academic and public communities via new media. Students will explore their role as active citizens, enabling them to use writing and technology to advocate for and enact change in their communities. Prerequisite: EL 110 or advanced placement. Fall and spring semesters.
EL 211 Professional Writing3
An introduction to professional writing, including business and technical writing. Emphasis on writing in context, project management, document design, teamwork, research, and technology. Also listed as EP 211.
EL 212 Religious Themes in Modern Literature3
Fiction (mostly novels) from a variety of contemporary fiction writers. Class explores 20th / 21st century treatments of religious themes; class is not a course in Christian literature.
EL 215 Contemporary African Literature3
Introduction to the African literary tradition since the mid-20th century through prose, poetry, orality and film by African writers on the continent and abroad. Includes contextual study of relevant colonial and migration histories and specific cultures. Periodic offering, Fall semester.
EL 216 Modern Drama3
A survey of modern drama including the major movements, playwrights and representative plays from 1900 to the present.
EL 220 Pilgrimage: Walking and Writing3
This course explores pilgrimage from a variety of eras, perspectives, and genres. Through reading, writing, multimedia, and research assignments, students consider a range of pilgrimage experiences, as well as contemporary uses and adaptations. Students will create their own pilgrimage, documenting and reflecting on their practice.
EL 222 Gender and Faith in Film and Literature3
Explores how religious beliefs shape our cultural and personal understandings of gender roles and gender identity. Also listed as WGS 122. Also listed as WGS 222. Periodic offering.
EL 229H Missionary Literature3
Honors seminar. Emphasizes reading, interpreting, and collecting missionary narratives as literary and cultural texts. Open to regular day students with strong reading/writing research skills.
EL 233 The Epic3
A survey of the classical and medieval epics, including Gilgamesh, Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid, and Dante's Divine Comedy. Attention to development of epic. Some emphasis on classical mythology. Periodic offering.
EL 238 Arthurian Literature3
This course studies Arthurian texts as well as more recent interpretations of the Arthurian stories. Cross-listed as HI 238. Also listed as HI/EMS 238. Jan Term,periodic offering.
EL 242 Whodunit: the Mystery Novel3
The mystery novel and story from Sherlock Holmes to Stephanie Plum, with attention to the genre's archetypes, conventions, mythic systems, and moral vision. Non-majors welcome. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 245 Creative Writing3
An introduction to creative writing, including multiple genres. Workshop approach. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly recommended. Also listed as EP 245. Fall and spring semesters.
EL 247 Shakespeare3
Survey of Shakespeare's poetry, comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances. Active learning through reading, discussing, studying, watching and performing plays. Also listed as EMS 247. Fall semester.
EL 248 Introduction to Editing3
Course introduces students to multiple disciplines within the editor's purview, including literary, journalistic, and web-based environments. Topics include aesthetics, magazine, newspaper, and web publishing, copyediting, and teaches significant textual analysis for contemporary rhetorical situation. Students will work on actual texts for final projects. Prereq: Written Com. gen ed, EL 245, or instructor permission. Also listed as EP 248.
EL 250 Introduction to Film Studies3
An introduction to film studies and film analysis with an emphasis on primarily US filmmakers. One evening per week for film viewing, in addition to regular class sessions. Also listed as FVNS 250. Film fee.
EL 251 Modern Global Literature3
Global literature, novels and short fiction, after 1945. Fall and Spring semesters.
EL 252 World Cinema3
Major movements and filmmakers from Europe, Asia and other regions (e.g., German Expressionism, French New Wave, Bergman, Kurosawa, Latin American film, Eastern European film). Periodic Jan Term offering. Film fee. Also listed as EL 352.
EL 262 The Bible as Literature3
Reading the Bible as a literary artifact: hero stories, prophetic oracles, myth, apocalypse, poetry. Use of literary criticism and its varied approaches. Periodic offering.
EL 267 Introduction to Critical Strategies3
Introduction to the strategies and terminology of literary criticism and the discipline of literary studies. Emphasis on the theoretical, historical, and practical applications of both traditional and contemporary literary criticism. Also listed as EP 267. Fall and spring semester.
EL 273 Poe3
Study of the poetry, fiction and essays of Edgar Allan Poe. Approximately forty short stories and sketches, his sole novel, several poems, three major essays, and selections from "Eureka". Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested. Also listed as EL 373. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 275 Utopian Literature3
Broad overview of utopian literature, theory, and activism, emphasizing historical context and real-world applications. Traces utopian fiction from its early roots in didactic literature to 20th-century and contemporary science fiction and fantasy.
EL 279 J.R.R. Tolkien3
Introduction to the life and works of J.R.R. Tolkien. Readings of his major literary works as well as folklore and medieval literature that influenced him and shaped his life as a scholar. Periodic offering.
EL 300 Domain of the Arts3
Exploration of drama, poetry, music, art, film. The arts in relation to society, values, faith. Taught in San Francisco. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 301 Children's Literature3
Reading and evaluation of a broad range of literature for children. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 302 Gender and Faith in Film and Literature3
Exploration of how religious beliefs shape our cultural and personal understanding of gender roles and gender identity.
EL 304 Fiction Writing3
Advanced-level workshop in the crafting of narrative and the marketing of fiction. Students read several examples of contemporary fiction. Workshop format. Prerequisite: EL 245 or permission of instructor. Fall and spring semester.
EL 305W Contemporary American Poetry3
Study of American poets, periods and major events, 1955 to the present. Includes central figures such as Adrienne Rich, Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, and contemporary poets such as Louise Gluck, Mary Oliver, Li-Young Lee, Naomi Shihab Nye, and others. Periodic offering.
EL 307W Women in American Fiction3
Portrayals of women in American fiction and popular literature. Female and male authors, primarily late 19th century. Also listed as WGS 307W.
EL 308W 18th Century British Literature3
Study of major 18th-century British authors, genres, social history. Particular emphasis on fiction, Restoration comedy, satire.
EL 309 Latin American Literature in English3
Study of contemporary novels, stories, poems, essays and films from Latin America, with special focus on Costa Rica. Works considered in light of historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on reading, discussion, and a range of writing assignments, from creative and reflective pieces to analysis and application of critical theory.
EL 310 Northwest Writers3
Readings from a diverse group of Northwestern poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers, with consideration of central themes and concerns shared among them. Explores the relationship between these writers and their region. Also listed as ENS 310.
EL 311 Playwriting3
Fundamentals of playwriting. Students will learn to write monologues, scenes and short plays, how to analyze a script, and the differences between play-writing and screen-writing. Prerequisite: Writing I. Periodic offering.
EL 314 Church Drama3
This course involves study of classic and contemporary drama used in Christian worship. Students will engage in biblical text study, critical writing, playwriting, and performance of original theatre on campus and in area churches.
EL 316 American Drama Since 19003
Examines a variety of American plays written and produced since 1900, with particular attention to how direction, staging, and performance factors affect the critical reading of dramatic texts. Also listed as LS 316.
EL 317 Whitman/Dickinson Seminar3
Seminar focuses on the relation between the poetic forms and voices of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Research project explores political & cultural events of the mid 19th century. Fall semester, even years.
EL 320 Pilgrimage: Walking and Writing3
This course explores pilgrimage from a variety of eras, perspectives, and genres. Through reading, writing, multimedia, and research assignments, students consider a range of pilgrimage experiences, as well as contemporary uses and adaptations. Students will create their own pilgrimage, documenting and reflecting on their practice.
EL 321W The American Novel to 19003
Development of the novel in the U.S. from 1794 to the dawn of the 20h century. 10 - 12 novels, including writers such as Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howels, Crane, Chopin. Prerequisite: EL 205 or EL 206.
EL 329 Visual Narratives3
Exploration of graphic novels, comics, and transmedia storytelling. Readings will include both exemplary visual narratives and relevant critical theory on such texts. Two evening screenings in addition to regular class meetings. Also listed as FVNS 329.
EL 330 Latina and Caribbean Women Writers3
Study of contemporary novels, stories, poems, and films produced by Latina and Caribbean American women in light of historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on reading and student response through written and oral assignments produced both individually and collaboratively. Also listed as EL 130, WGS 130/330. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 331W Southern Renaissance3
Major 20th-century American writers from the South (e.g., William Faulkner, R.P. Warren, Eudora Welty).
EL 333 Literary England (Study Abroad Program)4
Focus on British authors and works in relation to their settings. Part of British Isles study program, every third year (fall semester 2014, 2017, and so on).
EL 338 Arthurian Literature3
See EL 238. Also listed as EMS 338.
EL 339 Digital Storytelling3
Study of digital, multimodal writing/storytelling. Students create a variety of digital texts using freely available audio, video, and text editing tools. Two evening screenings in addition to regular class meetings. Prerequisites: EL 210, EL 245, JMC 125, or instructor permission. Also listed as JMC/FVNS 339. Jan term.
EL 340H Writing in Virtual Worlds3
An introduction to writing in, with, and about virtual worlds, including exploration of MUDs/MOOs, RPGs, MMORPGs, and others. Also listed as EP 340H.
EL 342 British Women Writers3
Examines the contributions of familiar (e.g., Austen, Bronte, Woolf) and less familiar women writers of Britain. Considers literary history in light of recent revisions of that history. Women's and gender studies elective; also listed as WGS 342. Periodic offering.
EL 343 Shakespeare on Film3
This course is an upper-division introduction to Shakespeare. By reading plays and by viewing filmed versions of Shakespeare plays, students will gain familiarity with both the play texts and the variety of ways that they have been reinterpreted on film and in other media. Also listed as EMS 343.
EL 344 Autobiographical Writing3
Practical and theoretical approaches to autobiography writing, including the personal essay. Readings in literary autobiography. Workshop format. Prerequisite: EL-245. Jan Term.
EL 345 Poetry Writing3
Advanced workshop in poetry composition, revision. Reading of current American poets. By application, portfolio. Prerequisite: EL 245. Fall and spring semester.
EL 346W Essay Writing3
Advanced workshop in writing contemporary essay genres including experimental critical writing and the literary essay. Reading of current literary essays. Prerequisite: written communication course and one other writing course strongly suggested. Fall and spring semester.
EL 347W Creative Nonfiction Writing3
Advanced workshop in memory-based or fact-based writing that is literary, employing stylistic devices of fiction and lyrical narrative poetry. Prerequisite: fulfillment of written communication requirement. Most semesters.
EL 348 Book Design and Publishing3
Exploration of print design and professional publishing. Extensive training in professional design software. Students produce a printed book and develop text-based print projects, as well as conduct significant research into contemporary publishing issues. Required: either sophomore status (or higher) or a declared Editing and Publishing minor. Also listed as EP 348.
EL 349W 20th Century American Fiction3
Significant American novelists from the World War I era to the contemporary era. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly recommended. Fall semester, odd years.
EL 351 Documentary/Avant Garde Film3
Focusing mostly on ethical and aesthetic issues in non-fiction film since Flaherty and Grierson in the 1930s, with emphasis on documentary filmmaking since the 1980s. A secondary emphasis on experimental short films (e.g. Maya Deren and Brakhage). One evening per week for film viewing, in addition to regular class sessions. Also listed as FVNS 351. Film fee.
EL 352 World Cinema3
Major movements and filmmakers from Europe, Asia and other regions (e.g., German Expressionism, French New Wave, Bergman, Kurosawa, Latin American film, Eastern European film). Periodic offering. Also listed as FVNS 352. Film fee.
EL 358 Composition Theory3
In this course students will read and discuss landmark essays and studies about composing processes and theories. Attention will be given to intellectual foundations of composition studies and current practice in the teaching of writing.
EL 359 Contemporary Fiction From Eastern Europe3
Study of about a dozen novels published recently (since 1985 in most cases) in Poland, the Czech Republic, Albania, Russia, Serbia, Hungary, Ukraine, Croatia, Bulgaria, and other countries in the region. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly suggested.
EL 360W 20th Century British Literature3
The fiction of the British Isles from 1900 to the present.
EL 361 20th Century British Poetry3
Survey of modern and contemporary British poets (Yeats and Auden and later poets). Periodic offering.
EL 362 The Bible as Literature3
Reading the Bible as a literary artifact: hero stories, prophetic oracles, myth, apocalypse, poetry. Use of literary criticism and its varied approaches.
EL 363 Seminar in Poetry of Witness3
Seminar explores WWII and post-WWII European and Eastern European poets, along with more recent poets from Israel and Palestine. Focus on the transcendent, truth-telling role of poetry and art that bears witness to unthinkable cultural destruction. Fall semester, even years.
EL 368 Postcolonial British Literature3
An examination of key texts and debates in postcolonial British writing. Representative areas and writers may include India (Kipling, Forster, Rushdie, Roy), the African Continent (Conrad, Achebe, Coetzee, Gordimer), Ireland (Joyce, Yeats, Bowen), and theory by Said, Spivak, and Bhabha. Prerequisite: American Cultural Studies course strongly recommended.
EL 371W British Renaissance3
Examination of the major poetry, plays, and prose of the period, excluding Shakespeare. Prerequisite: EL-207. Also listed as EMS 371W.
EL 372W American Renaissance3
Major figures of the extraordinarily rich blossoming of American literature, 1835-1860 (e.g., Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and less lights).
EL 373 Poe3
See EL 273.
EL 374W 17th Century British Poetry/Milton3
English poetry of the 17th century: metaphysical and cavalier (e.g., Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Marvell) plus Milton, with emphasis on "Paradise Lost." Periodic offering.
EL 375W Victorian Literature3
Seminar focusing on literary figures and genres of 19th- century Britain, including fiction, prose, poetry, autobiography and drama. Explores Victorian visual media and other popular print culture. Prerequisite: EL 208. Fall semester, even years.
EL 376W British Romanticism3
Romantic literature in an age of revolution (e.g., Wollstonecraft, Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Keats).
EL 377W Modern Poetry3
The revolution of Modernism in American poetry, 1910-1940 (e.g., Eliot, Pound, Williams, Stevens). Periodic offering.
EL 378 Jane Austen3
A seminar on Jane Austen's major works. Some literary background strongly suggested. Also listed as WGS 378. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 381 Archival Research1-3
See HI 381.
EL 382 Rhetorical Methods and Approaches3
This course concerns the rationale, methods and applications of rhetorical criticism in English studies. Includes a survey of contemporary critical approaches to persuasive writing. Prerequisite: completion of written communication requirement and one other writing course recommended. Also listed as EP 382. Spring semester, odd years.
EL 384 The Rhetoric of Human Rights3
An advanced seminar in which classical and contemporary rhetorical theory is utilized to understand the historical development of human rights discourse. Students will use historical and theoretical texts to analyze works of fiction, non-fiction, and digital media used by contemporary non-profits in order to understand how language shapes our perceptions of human rights concerns.
EL 387 English Methods and Adolescent Literature3
English methods, including theory and practice of teaching the writing process. Reading adolescent literature. Spring semester.
EL 388 Structure and Development of the English Language3
Review of traditional grammar, exposure to various new grammars, development of usage. Designed for prospective teachers. Also listed as TES 388. Fall and spring semesters.
EL 396H This Whitworth Life: Audio Storytelling3
Inspired by This American Life, The Moth Radio Hour, Story Corps, and other audio programs, students will build a portfolio of their own audio work. Topics will include elements of storytelling and narrative design, ethical obligations in handling other people's stories, and the technical components of this kind of work, including recording and editing. Also listed as EP 396H. Jan Term. Periodic Offering.
EL 401W Moby Dick3
A close study of Herman Melville's leviathanic novel. Students will read "Moby Dick" twice in three weeks, become absolute masters of two chapters, and never be the same. Prerequisite: EL-205. Periodic Jan Term offering.
EL 405W Chaucer and Medieval Literature3
Emphasis on Canterbury Tales (in Middle English). Other poetry and plays of the late medieval period will be read. Prerequisite: EL 207. Also listed as EMS 405W.
EL 420 Writing Center: Theory and Practice3
Initial training for Whitworth Writing Center consultants. Includes writing center theory and philosophy along with development of analytical insight into papers and interpersonal skills necessary for consulting. Prerequisite: faculty nomination and then completion of application and selection process. Spring semester.
EL 422H Joyce and Woolf Seminar3
Examines fiction by major twentieth-century authors James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, using collaborative, creative projects. Recommended that students have prior courses in the honors program or English department.
EL 430 Holocaust Literature3
Study of works by Elie Wiesel and other writers of the Holocaust. Prerequisite: two literature courses strongly suggested.
EL 436 Francophone African Lit/Film3
Introduction to literature and film from French-speaking African countries after independence, including historical and cultural background. Also listed as FR 436. Periodic offering.
EL 442 Brontes and Gaskell Seminar3
Studies the creative works of the Bronte sisters and Elizabeth Gaskell within the context of 19th-century Britain. Prerequisite: EL 208. Also listed as WGS 442.
EL 444 Advanced Writing Workshop3
Workshop/seminar for serious, self-motivated students who have completed EL 245, EL 304 and EL 345. Introduction to the major contemporary literary journals, on-line publications, writer's markets, and contemporary theory. Much of course devoted to developing a single substantial writing project.
EL 447 Shakespeare Seminar3
Special topics course on Shakespeare's dramatic and non-dramatic literature. Topics vary but will focus upon particular genres, historical contexts, and ideas in a limited number of plays. Prerequisite: EL 207. Also listed as EMS 447.
EL 449W Postmodern Literature and Culture3
Readings in postmodern literature and theory, with attention to the break from aesthetic Modernism and to cultural dilemmas commonly informing postmodern texts. Prerequisite: EL 205, EL 206, EL 207, EL 208, or instructor permission; American cultural studies course strongly recommended. Also listed as EP 449W.
EL 453 Introduction to Linguistics3
A general study of language content and systems, with primary focus on sounds, meaning, historical change, and social contexts. Spring semester, odd years.
EL 454 Russian Literature3
Russian fiction of the 19th century (e.g., Turgenev, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy). Non-majors welcome. Periodic offering.
EL 460 Irish Literature3
Fiction, drama, poetry, and film by Irish artists (e.g., Joyce, Yeats, Bowen, Beckett) along with study of political and cultural contexts.
EL 465W English Novel3
The history and development of the novel from 1720 through 1895 (e.g., Defoe, Fielding, Austen, Gaskell, Hardy).
EL 480 Field Studies1-4
EL 484 Literary Criticism3
Learning to write from various critical perspectives. Major literary theories from Aristotle to the 21st Century. Junior standing strongly suggested. Prerequisite: EL 205 or 206 and EL 207 or 208. Also listed as EP 484. Spring semester, odd years.
EL 494 Track III Portfolio0
EL 497 Medieval and Early Modern Studies Senior Portfolio1
Students will submit a portfolio by April 15 of their final year (or midway through their final term). The portfolio will include a selection of work from 3 to 4 courses in the minor. Also listed as HI/EMS 497. Spring semester.
EL 498 Senior Portfolio1
Capstone colloquium for English majors, including revision and submission of their best work in portfolio form. Fall semester.

Humanities Courses

HU 200 Introduction to Culture British Isles - Abroad1
This course will provide a survey of the art, history, and literature of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Required for and exclusive to students participating in the British Isles Study Program. Jan Term, every third year.
HU 201 International Films1
Professors from different disciplines present seven international films; students view films together and react to them through short papers. Learn about international cinematic traditions and film history. Also listed as FVNS 201. Fall semester.
HU 226H Arthurian Legends in French Literature3
This course will examine Arthurian legends as recorded in the literary oeuvre of Chretien de Troyes of France. Students will read the original unfinished version of the quest of the Holy Grail and devise and film their own unique ending to this enduring legend. Also listed as EMS 226H. Fall semester. Periodic offering.
HU 302 French Civilization - Abroad Program Preparation2
A survey of French history from the Gauls and Romans through the 19th century, with emphasis on contemporary French culture. Required for and exclusive to students participating in the France Study Program. Fall semester, every third year preceding the program.
HU 314 Tanzania Study Program: Preparation Course1
This course is designed to equip you with the academic and logistical background you need to thrive on the Tanzania Study Program. The preparation course will prepare you to live in east Africa for a semester, and will include a primer for the courses you will take while in Tanzania.
HU 349 Introduction to Thailand Studies2
Preparation for Jan Term in Thailand.
HU 350 Thailand Study Program3
See WGS 350.

 Requirements for an English Major, B.A.

Track I: Literature (46)

1. AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE (3 credits)
These courses include an introduction to basic literary terms; practice in close reading and analysis; practice in writing literary analysis; coverage of more than one genre; and a multicultural American component, either in the kinds of literature read or in the issues focused on in the literature (e.g., issues of ethnicity, gender, or class in the American context).
Choose one of the following:3
African American Literature
Reading Literature
Women Writers
African American Women Writers
Multicultural American Literature
Latina & Caribbean Women Writers
Native American Literature
American Immigrant Literature
Asian American Literature
Gender and Faith in Film and Literature
Note: Other 100-level literature courses designated by the department may in some cases be used to fulfill this requirement.
2. FOUNDATIONS (15 credits)
These courses provide a foundation for further study of literature.
Literature Surveys (Take one American survey and both British surveys.)9
American Literature Before 1865
or EL 206
American Literature After 1865
British Literature Before 1800
British Literature Since 1800
Global Literatures (Choose one of the following courses.)3
The Epic
Modern Global Literature
Contemporary Fiction From Eastern Europe
Seminar in Poetry of Witness
Holocaust Literature
Francophone African Lit/Film
Russian Literature
Literary Critical Reading (Choose one of the following courses.)3
Introduction to Critical Strategies
or EL 484
Literary Criticism
3. DISTRIBUTIVE REQUIREMENTS (18 credits)
15 of these credits must be upper division credits.
Distributive requirements give students the opportunity to study literature from a variety of historical periods and perspectives.
a. Beginnings Through Renaissance6
Shakespeare
or EL 447
Shakespeare Seminar
Arthurian Literature
British Renaissance
17th Century British Poetry/Milton
Chaucer and Medieval Literature
b. 18th-19th Century6
Women in American Fiction
18th Century British Literature
Whitman/Dickinson Seminar
The American Novel to 1900
British Women Writers
American Renaissance
Poe
Victorian Literature
British Romanticism
Jane Austen
Moby Dick
Brontes and Gaskell Seminar
English Novel
c. 20th-21st Century6
Modern Drama
Contemporary American Poetry
Northwest Writers
American Drama Since 1900
Visual Narratives
Southern Renaissance
20th Century American Fiction
Contemporary Fiction From Eastern Europe
20th Century British Literature
20th Century British Poetry
Seminar in Poetry of Witness
Postcolonial British Literature
Modern Poetry
Holocaust Literature
Francophone African Lit/Film
Postmodern Literature and Culture
Irish Literature
4. ONE ADDITIONAL ENGLISH WRITING COURSE (3 credits)3
Any English writing elective numbered higher than EL 210 may be used to fulfill this requirement.
5. ENRICHMENT/ENGLISH ELECTIVES (6 credits)6
Any additional English elective other than EL 110 (Writing I) may count toward these credits.
6. EL 498, SENIOR PORTFOLIO (1 credit)1
Senior Portfolio

Track II: Writing Studies (49)

1. AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE (3 credits)
See Track I (Literature) for course options.3
2. FOUNDATIONS (15 credits)
Introduction to Creative Writing 3
Creative Writing
Professionalization3
Professional Writing
or EL 248
Introduction to Editing
Literature Surveys (Take one American and one British literature survey.)6
American Literature Before 1865
or EL 206
American Literature After 1865
British Literature Before 1800
or EL 208
British Literature Since 1800
One course in literary critical reading from the following:3
Introduction to Critical Strategies
or EL 484
Literary Criticism
3. WRITING, RHETORIC, COMPOSITION, LANGUAGE (12 credits)
Take two of the following creative writing courses.6
Fiction Writing
Poetry Writing
Autobiographical Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Take two of the following writing studies courses.6
Digital Storytelling
Composition Theory
Rhetorical Methods and Approaches
Structure and Development of the English Language
Writing Center: Theory and Practice
Introduction to Linguistics
4. ENRICHMENT COURSES IN WRITING, RHETORIC, COMPOSITION, LANGUAGE (6 credits)6
These elective credits may be fulfilled by taking additional courses from section 3 (above) or by taking approved enrichment courses in writing, rhetoric, composition, and/or language.
Options for fulfilling these credits may include the following.
- Additional courses from Section 3, above
- Approved upper-division writing seminars in English
- Approved upper-division English special-topics courses in writing/rhetoric
- Approved upper-division Communications courses in writing/rhetoric
- Approved internships (in journalism, publications, etc.)
- Teaching assistantships in EL 110 or other writing courses
Writing II
Professional Writing
Introduction to Editing
Church Drama
Pilgrimage: Walking and Writing
Writing in Virtual Worlds
Essay Writing
Advanced Writing Workshop
5. LITERATURE (12 credits)12
- One course in 20th- or 21st-century literature (3 credits)
- One upper-division elective in American literature (3 credits)
- An additional upper-division literature elective (3 credits)
- An additional upper-level literature elective, Intro to Film (EL250), or a 3-credit, upper-level film course (3 credits)
6. EL 498, SENIOR PORTFOLIO (1 Credit)1
Senior Portfolio

Track III: English/Language Arts (45)

This track is especially intended for students who are simultaneously completing education certification through Whitworth's Education department.
Students who hope to enter a master's-level teaching certification program in English soon after graduation are best served by completing Track I (literature) along with selected additional coursework. Such students are heartily encouraged to speak with (1) their academic advisors and (2) Whitworth's MIT (Master in Teaching) advisor about how best to prepare for a graduate-level teaching certification program in English.
Meets Washington state teaching endorsement requirements for English/language arts.
All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated certification requirements.
1. AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE (3 credits)3
See Track I (Literature) for course options.
2. LITERATURE (21 credits)
Literature Surveys (Take one American survey and both British surveys.)9
American Literature Before 1865
or EL 206
American Literature After 1865
British Literature Before 1800
British Literature Since 1800
Shakespeare (Choose one of the following courses.)3
Shakespeare
or EL 447
Shakespeare Seminar
Global Literatures (Choose one of the following courses.)3
The Epic
Modern Global Literature
Contemporary Fiction From Eastern Europe
Seminar in Poetry of Witness
Holocaust Literature
Francophone African Lit/Film
Russian Literature
Additional Literature Courses6
One upper-division course in American or British Literature
One additional upper-division literature course
3. WRITING AND LANGUAGE (9 credits)
EL 387English Methods and Adolescent Literature3
EL 388Structure and Development of the English Language3
One writing course from the following:3
Writing II
Creative Writing
Fiction Writing
Autobiographical Writing
Poetry Writing
Essay Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing
A Teaching Assistantship in EL 110 (Must be Approved by Petition) (3 credits)
4. SPEECH, THEATER, AND MASS MEDIA (12 credits)
JMC 125Writing for Mass Media3
TA 273Acting I3
SP 210Introduction to Public Speaking3
Three semester credits selected from the following:3
Applied Journalism: Newspaper (1 credit)
Applied Journalism: Yearbook (1 credit)
Argumentation and Debate (4 credits)
Editorial Practicum: Newspaper (1 credit)
Theatre Production (1-2 credits)
Stage Makeup & Costume Construction (2 credits)
Stagecraft I (3 credits)
Stagecraft II (3 credits)
5. SENIOR PORTFOLIO0
During fall semester of senior year, Track III students must complete a writing portfolio, working with advisors from the English and education departments.
Track III students, whose student teaching serves as a capstone experience, are NOT required to take EL 498 (Senior Portfolio), though they may choose to do so.

The standard English Minor allows students a wide range of choices, so that they can choose to focus their coursework on writing, literature, or another desirable combination of courses from among our offerings. We also offer a Language Arts Minor, intended for students who are completing education certification or for students who plan to apply to a masters in teaching program immediately after graduation. In addition to the standard minor and the Language Arts Minor, English supports and encourages minors in Editing and Publishing, Film and Visual Narrative, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), and Women's and Gender Studies. Links to the requirements for those minors have been provided below. 

English Minor (18 Credits)

Requirements for an English Minor (18)

1. AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE (3 credits)3
See Track I (Literature) for course options.
2. ENGLISH ELECTIVES (15 credits)15
15 English course credits (usually 5 courses), including at least two upper-division courses (which may have prerequisites).
Note: EL 110 (Writing I) does not count toward the English minor.

English/Language Arts Minor (29-33 Credits)

Requirements for an English/Language Arts Minor (29-33)

This minor is intended for students who are completing education certification or who plan to apply to a masters in teaching program immediately after graduation.
Meets Washington state teaching endorsement requirements for English/language arts.
All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated certification requirements.
1. AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE (3 credits)3
See Track I (Literature) for course options.
2. LITERATURE (15 credits)
Literature Surveys (Take one American and one British literature survey.)6
American Literature Before 1865
or EL 206
American Literature After 1865
British Literature Before 1800
or EL 208
British Literature Since 1800
Global Literatures (Choose one of the following courses.)3
The Epic
Modern Global Literature
Contemporary Fiction From Eastern Europe
Seminar in Poetry of Witness
Holocaust Literature
Francophone African Lit/Film
Russian Literature
One of the following (depending on level):3
If secondary, one upper-division literature course (preferably Shakespeare)
If elementary, one additional literature course
3. WRITING AND LANGUAGE (6 credits)
EL 387English Methods and Adolescent Literature3
EL 388Structure and Development of the English Language3
One writing course numbered higher than EL 110 (Writing I)3
4. SPEECH, THEATER, AND MASS MEDIA (5-9 credits)
SP 210Introduction to Public Speaking3
At least one semester credit selected from the following:1-3
Writing for Mass Media (3 credits)
Applied Journalism: Newspaper (1 credit)
Applied Journalism: Yearbook (1 credit)
Editorial Practicum: Newspaper (1 credit)
Argumentation and Debate (4 credits)
At least one semester credit selected from the following:1-3
Theatre Production (1-2 credits)
Stage Makeup & Costume Construction (2 credits)
Acting I (3 credits)
Stagecraft I (3 credits)
Stagecraft II (3 credits)

Editing and Publishing (21 Credits)

Requirements for the Editing and Publishing Minor are listed on the Editing and Publishing page.
The Editing and Publishing (EP) Minor provides focused engagement and practical experience with text production, editorial discernment, and multiplatform design and publishing. EP students study the aesthetics and ethics of editorial work and multiple methods of textual production. They will create portfolio- and resume-worthy projects, and they will undertake significant professional internships. The EP Minor provides students with a unique opportunity to directly apply their humanities education to professional situations and future careers.

(EP Requirements)

Film and Visual Narrative (18-20 Credits)

Requirements for the Film and Visual Narrative Minor are listed in the Film and Visual Narrative page
The Film and Visual Narrative Minor is designed for students who are interested in focused engagement with film, visual storytelling, and emerging forms of digital narrative. FVN students study the history and aesthetics of film and related sequential visual media. While the minor focuses mainly on analyzing and responding to media, rather than on production, some electives in the minor give students the chance to experiment in various ways with media production.

(FVN Requirements)

Medieval and Early Modern Studies (19-20 Credits)

Requirements for the Medieval and Early Modern Studies minor are listed at the Medieval and Early Modern Studies page
The Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) Minor is designed for students interested in early time periods (from the fall of Rome in 450 CE to about 1800). The minor draws from many different fields on campus, including English, History, Music, and Art. Students will study these fields and time periods using interdisciplinary approaches.

(MEMS Requirements)

TESOL Minor: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (16 Credits)

Requirements for the TESOL minor are listed at the TESOL page
This short-term TESOL program is designed for students who would like to teach English to speakers of other languages. It is excellent preparation for (among other things) teaching abroad, teaching in private language schools, adult education, the Peace Corps, and Fulbright English Teaching Assistantships around the world. Students will study English language structure and acquisition, language pedagogy, and approaches to socio-cultural knowledge; all students will gain practical field experience in TESOL. Students in any major may apply for the TESOL Minor. Please note that the minor is not designed to lead to official certification for the U.S. public school system (which can be obtained through the completion of the teacher-education program in Whitworth's School of Education, catalog.whitworth.edu/undergraduate/education/).

(TESOL Requirements)

Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) Minor (18 Credits)

Requirements for the Women's and Gender Studies Minor are listed at the Women's and Gender Studies page.
The Women's and Gender Studies Program provides students with an intellectual framework for analyzing the role of gender in all aspects of their lives. It empowers each minor to imagine a world in which equality and freedom are possible for all people, and it invites them to take action to bring that world into being. Whether students hope to launch a business with women in developing countries, minister from a lens of equality, study environmental law, write novels, practice obstetrics, or pursue elected office, Women's and Gender Studies will allow them to frame a course of study to help find a path best suited to their interests.

(WGS Requirements)

Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Chair

FRED JOHNSON

Professors

VIC BOBBLAURIE LAMONLEONARD OAKLANDPAMELA CORPRON PARKERDOUGLAS SUGANO

Associate professors

CASEY ANDREWSFRED JOHNSONJOHN PELLNICOLE SHEETS

Assistant professors

THOM CARAWAYJESSICA CLEMENTSLUELLA D'AMICO

Director of the Composition Commons

JESSICA CLEMENTS

Director of University Writing Program

JOHN PELL

Lecturers

ANGELA ALLENSARAH DILWORTHADDIE GROWMAGGIE WOLCOTT