Shared Curriculum/Core

http://www.whitworth.edu/core

Core/Worldview Studies

Whitworth’s three-part Core Program, consisting of Core 150, 250 and 350 (as well as Core 300 in the School of Continuing Studies), focuses on the concept of worldview. Simply put, a worldview is a set of beliefs that we hold about the basic makeup of our world. A worldview serves as a lens through which we perceive and relate to reality; it is a set of core beliefs and basic understandings about the bigger and deeper questions of life. 

The Ultimate Questions

To get at these core worldview beliefs and their related issues, the Core courses will focus on four foundational questions:

Metaphysics: What is the nature of reality (God, the world)? What is the nature of human beings?

Epistemology: What are our sources of knowledge?

Ethics and Policy: How should we act in response to reality (God, the world and humanity) as individuals and as a community?

Together, Core classes aim to provide students with basic categories of worldview thinking, to introduce ideas that have been influential, and to explore challenges to these ideas.

Student learning outcomes (Shared Curriculum – Belief Inquiry)

Whitworth’s Core Program is a central part of the Belief Inquiry Group (BIG) of courses in the Shared Curriculum. Like other courses in the Belief Inquiry Group, Core courses are dedicated to engaging Christian belief faithfully and critically, while welcoming the diversity of belief among our students and fostering a community of rigorous inquiry. The BIG nurtures curiosity, autonomy and humility in students as they explore their own beliefs and consider the beliefs of others. These courses ground, enrich and deepen worldview development by equipping students to apply philosophical, theological and ethical reasoning to questions about what is true, what is good and beautiful, and how we should live.

Under this broad umbrella, there are three objectives:

Explore: Demonstrate understanding of concepts related to metaphysics, epistemology, anthropology, politics, and/or ethics, and the relevance of these concepts to the development of a worldview.

Reflect: Analyze aspects of one's worldview in relation to metaphysics, epistemology, anthropology, politics, and/or ethics, with supported reasons for holding such a worldview.

Apply: Produce an argument that applies one's worldview to a given topic with supported reasons for holding such a view.

Although each of these objectives will be addressed in some way within all three Core courses (150, 250 and 350), each Core class will emphasize and devote special attention to one question in particular. Core 300 addresses parallel themes in the School of Continuing Studies.

CO Courses

CO 150 Ancient and Modern Worldviews in Christian Perspective3
This course engages students in the examination of their beliefs regarding the nature of God, humanity, and the world. Acknowledging both unity and diversity within the Christian tradition, the course focuses on aspects of a Christian worldview, including key theological concepts.
CO 150H Ancient and Modern Worldviews in Christian Perspective3
This course engages students in the examination of their beliefs regarding the nature of God, humanity and the world. It covers these topics by helping students understand the nature and formation of worldviews, providing an overview of non-Christian religious traditions, articulating the Christian tradition through the biblical story and the three primary branches of Christianity, and critically examining a number of contemporary worldview-shaping factors.
CO 250 Worldview & Role of Reason Rationalist Worldview3
This course examines, contextualizes, and critiques views of the role of reason in human thought from classical Greece to the contemporary period. It models and encourages the articulation of a coherent and supported worldview.
CO 250H Worldview and the Role of Reason (explained through film)3
This course engages students in study of sources of knowledge (epistemology), with emphasis on the role of reason, through analysis of intellectual themes in films. Beginning with foundations in ancient Greece, and extending through the growing ascendancy of the Christian Church, the Enlightenment, and periods of challenge, contributions of rationalists and challenges to rationalism are explored. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own intellectual assumptions, including the role that reason plays in knowing what is true and discerning what is good.
CO 300 Worldview, Reality, and Human Nature3
This worldview course for Continuing Studies students focuses on how questions regarding the sources of knowledge, reality, ethics, and human nature have been explored within Christian, rationalist, and related traditions. Beginning with the ancient Hebrews and Greeks, and continuing through contemporary challenges to their worldview assumptions, students are encouraged to reflect on their own intellectual assumptions regarding what is true and good, by engaging with a range of perspectives from across history.
CO 300H Worldview in Policy3
This course asks students to consider public, social, and institutional policy against the backdrop of worldview and ethics. It emphasizes the application of worldview claims to the private and public spheres of life, with special consideration of practical and ethical questions.
CO 350 Worldviews in Policy3
This course asks students to consider public, social, and institutional policy against the backdrop of worldview and ethics. It emphasizes the application of worldview claims to the private and public spheres of life, with special consideration of practical and ethical questions.
CO 350H Worldviews in Policy3
This course asks students to consider public, social, and institutional policy against the backdrop of worldview and ethics. It emphasizes the application of worldview claims to the private and public spheres of life, with special consideration of practical and ethical questions.

SC Courses

SC 125 First Year Seminar1
Presentations, discussions, and activities that encourage the successful transition to college life and help first-year students become a part of the Whitworth community.
SC 125H Honors First Year Seminar1
Presentations and discussions are designed to inform frosh with honors at entrance about the university's traditions, procedures and to help them become a part of the Whitworth community and the GW Honors Program. Elective for first-term frosh interested in pursuing the GW Honors Program.
SC 126 Connecting the Disciplines1
Introduction to interdisciplinarity and the interdependence of knowledge. Students will explore what it means to synthesize various sets of knowledge and skills through interdisciplinary learning.
SC 126H Connecting the Disciplines (honors)1
Introduction to interdisciplinarity and the interdependence of knowledge. Students will explore what it means to synthesize various sets of knowledge and skills through interdisciplinary learning. Whitworth Honors students take precedent for enrollment.
SC 301 Foundations of Vocational Service1
The goal of this course is to motivate students to consider the possibility post-graduate service, explore the benefits of such service, and learn how to apply for service opportunities. Students will consider how their personal faith/worldview can be integrated within the service experience. Finally, students will learn how to find service opportunities that are available to them locally, nationally, and internationally. Intercultural awareness and the benefits of reflection after service will be emphasized.
SC 325 Transfer Seminar1
Presentations, discussions, and activities that encourage the successful transition to college life at Whitworth and help transfer students become a part of the Whitworth community.
SC 325H Honors Transfer Seminar1
SC-325H is designed to assist transfer students in a successful transition to the Whitworth community. Students will learn about opportunities and resources to help them connect with students and faculty and plan a course for academic success. While each section of the course has unique properties, this course is designed to help students get tapped into the Honors Program as quickly as possible.
Program Contact

JOSH LEIM (CORE 150)KAMESH SANKARAN (CORE 350)