Education

http://www.whitworth.edu/soe

The School of Education at Whitworth University includes the Department of Teacher Education, the Center for Gifted Education, the Department of Graduate Studies in Education, the Master in Teaching Program, the Office of Educational Certification and Career Services, and the Evening Teacher Certification Program. All certification programs in the School of Education are approved by the Washington State Professional Educator Standards Board and are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. Education

The mission of the Whitworth School of Education is to prepare teachers, counselors, and administrators to be educators of mind and heart who are scholars, community members, effective practitioners, visionary leaders, and guardians. The School of Education provides opportunities to integrate theory and practice in diverse settings through the study of established and emerging content, as well as through pedagogical and professional knowledge. Whitworth University prepares educators to have a positive impact on the learning and development of those whom they are called to serve.

The learning outcomes of this major prepare students to be the following:

Scholars: Educators of mind and heart possess current knowledge of the content areas in which they work, understand the connections among disciplines, use tools of inquiry, and demonstrate an attitude of ongoing learning as existing fields of knowledge continue to evolve and grow. Educators of mind and heart strengthen their existing knowledge base through continuous intellectual and scholarly growth based on current research, the study of their own practice, the analysis of data collected, and the application of data to the solution of problems in their respective fields of study.

Community Members: Educators of mind and heart develop and sustain collaborative and interdependent relationships among teachers, students and their families, counselors, administrators, and other community members.  Educators of mind and heart understand their roles as professional colleagues in their schools, their communities, and their professional organizations. They help shape the culture of classrooms and schools to reflect the values of our democratic society. They model professional behaviors appropriate for those entrusted with educating today's children and young people.

Effective Practitioners: Educators of mind and heart are prepared to analyze situations, set goals, plan and monitor actions, assess outcomes, and reflect on their professional thinking and decision-making. They are committed to culturally responsive and relevant practices that engage students, and they are purposeful in making a positive impact on their students' learning. They demonstrate proficiency in the selection and differentiation of materials, strategies, and assessment practices that are appropriate for the diversity of students and for the educational contexts in which they serve. They use formative and cumulative data as evidence for decision-making. They are competent in using technology and other 21st-century skills and expertise in the educational setting to improve their own practice and the learning of their students. 

Visionary Leaders: Educators of mind and heart have a vision. They articulate a personal philosophy of education that includes a belief in the worth and ability of each human being and provides a framework guiding personal and professional decision-making and development.  The educators' practices are intentionally aligned with this vision for the benefit of members of their learning communities. Educators of mind and heart model transformational and servant leadership in their learning communities and in their contributions to society.

Guardians: Educators of mind and heart act as advocates for children and youth, demonstrating a sincere and equitable commitment to the success of all, paying attention to the role that diversity – including gender, ability, ethnicity, race, culture, religion and socio-economic status – brings to learning and the community. Educators understand and respect the interconnected, global nature of society and encourage sustainable practices designed to preserve our world for future generations. In the Christian tradition of servant leadership, educators serve humankind and seek opportunities to assist, encourage, and support all those under their care in a manner that leads to transformation in the lives of their students.

Whitworth University is in compliance with the U.S. Department of Education Title II reporting requirements. The most recent Whitworth University Title II report is available on our website: www.whitworth.edu/soe/titleII.htm. For more information or to request a copy, contact the office of the dean of the School of Education.

Department of Teacher Education Undergraduate Program

The Whitworth Department of Teacher Education views the role of the teacher as a calling – a commitment to understanding and responding compassionately to the needs of children and youth. The undergraduate teacher-education program conceptualizes our graduates as educators of mind and heart who serve as scholars, community members, effective practitioners, visionary leaders, and guardians. Courses in the program are structured around this conceptual framework, and students are encouraged to view their future roles as teachers through this model.

American Sign Language Courses

ASL 100 Intro to Sign Language3
Preparation for language acquisition via overview of sign language with concentration on language universals of category and relationship. For continuing studies students only.
ASL 101 Introduction to Sign Language & the Deaf4
Study of American Sign Language, language acquisition, teaching methods, teaching sequences and materials for persons with hearing impairments, communication disorders, and cognitive delays. Overview of the history of sign language as well as receptive and expressive finger-spelling. Also listed as EDS 501 (students must register for graduate-level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program). Fall Semester and Summer.
ASL 102 Sign Language & the Deaf II4
Advanced study of American Sign Language and the culture of the deaf. Expansion and improvement of manual communication skills, translating or interpreting abilities, and development of mental- processing techniques for comprehending the meaning of unfamiliar signs. Overview of educational aspects of deaf culture and sign language. Also listed as EDS 502. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: ASL 101. Spring Semester and Summer.
ASL 390H Honors Internship1-4
ASL 392H Honors Study Abroad1-12
This course enables honors students who participate in regular study abroad programs to receive honors credit toward their program. This course concentrates on cultural competency and reflections on critical moments in their study abroad experiences. Letter-graded.

Education: Teacher Ed. Courses

EDU 150 Exceptionality Across the Life Span3
This course acquaints students with the issues associated with human diversity across the lifespan in today's society. The focus is on individuals who have disabilities, their struggle for legal rights and social inclusion, and resources available for support. Students will also work directly with community agencies that serve people with disabilities. Meets general education American Diversity requirement. Jan Term.
EDU 201 Educational Psychology for Children and Adolescents3
A study of children and youth with a focus on psychology in the classroom. Developmental aspects (cognitive, social-emotional, moral, spiritual, and physical) and sociological challenges (abuse and neglect, substance abuse, poverty, familial discord) and their impact on teaching and learning are examined. Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: EDU 202. Also listed as LS 201. Fall and spring semesters and Jan term.
EDU 201H Honors Educational Psychology3
Honors section of Educational Psychology with emphasis on applied research in educational psychology. A study of children and youth with a focus on psychology in the classroom. Developmental aspects (cognitive, social-emotional, moral, spiritual, and physical) and sociological challenges (abuse and neglect, substance abuse, poverty, familial discord) and their impact on teaching and learning are examined. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 202. Spring semester.
EDU 202 Exploring Teaching1
On-campus seminars examine the profession of teaching. Co-requisite: EDU 203. Also listed as LS 202. Fall and spring semesters and Jan Term.
EDU 203 Field Experience1
Semester-long field experience in which candidates are placed in classrooms as teaching assistants and tutors. Opportunity for candidates to reflect on their potential as educators, and relate classroom experience to EDU 201 and Washington state educational reforms. May require transportation to an off-campus placement. Concurrent enrollment in EDU 202 required. Fall and spring semesters and Jan Term.
EDU 320 Exceptional Learners and Inclusion3
Provides an overview of children with disabilities, gifted education, legal issues, intervention strategies, family systems, and teaming approaches related to special education. Emphasis placed on accommodations for high incidence conditions. Introduction of Individualized Education Plans and completion of a service-learning experience in a home setting. Also listed as EDS 520 (students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 201, EDU 202, and EDU 203. Fall and Spring Semesters.
EDU 321 Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
Introduction to behavior disorders, applied behavior analysis, data collection, and research design. Students plan, collect data, implement and evaluate an intervention. They learn to collect data and do functional assessments and document learning. Field experience included. Also listed as EDS 521. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Fall and Spring Semesters.
EDU 322 Assessment and IEP Planning3
Practice and study of formal and informal, assessments. Integration and implementation of assessment into the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEP) for children and youth in special education settings. Students also will use data-based decision making to in inform educational practices and behavior-change interventions. Also listed as EDS 522. (Students must register for graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Fall semester.
EDU 323 Intervention for Academic Learning Problems3
Methods and strategies to address academic learning problems for students with mild disabilities in math, reading, language, writing, and spelling. Includes class-wide peer tutoring, active responding, guided notes, Precision Teaching, Direct Instruction, Success for All, data-based intervention approaches and other relevant curriculum. Service learning project included. Also listed as EDS 523. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Fall and Spring Semesters.
EDU 326 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion3
The purpose of this course is to increase knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to create environments that are inclusive and enriched by diverse views and people. Increased levels of cultural sensitivity and responsiveness will be developed through didactic and experiential learning. The didactic portion will focus on Survey of historical and societal influences on the education of cultural groups in the USA.This is a step up course. Undergraduate students can take it for graduate credit. It is also a part of the US Cultural Studies Minor.
EDU 329 Principles of Behavior for Mid/Secondary Classroom3
This course examines principles and practices of behavior management in the middle and secondary classroom. Fieldwork includes planning and carrying out a classroom intervention for a student with special needs. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Prerequisites: EDU 320. Spring semester.
EDU 340 K-8: General and Language Arts Methods Curriculum3
This course presents methods and materials for elementary teachers. Observation and teacher assistantship in the public schools, microteaching, Common Core Standards for English/Language Arts and unit preparation utilizing appropriate teaching models based on learning theory, provide opportunities to reinforce course content. The various strands of language arts will be explored including: writing, listening, speaking, and reading. Candidates will gain familiarity with writing programs and methods for assessing student writing. Prerequisite: junior standing. Corequisites: EDU 341 and EDU 342. Meets Whitworth's oral communication requirement. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 341 Mathematics: Elementary/Middle School Methods (K-9)2
Introduction to math curriculum, instruction, and assessment in the elementary classroom. Development of lessons and unit plans based on best-practice research and Common Core Standards. Prerequisite: junior standing. Co-requisites: EDU 340, EDU 342. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 342 Elementary Curriculum Field Experience1
Semester-long placement in an elementary classroom to develop competencies in teaching and assessing learning in language arts and math. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Prerequisite: junior standing. Corequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 343 Science: K-9 Methods and Assessment2
Introduction to instruction and assessment of science teaching at the elementary and middle levels and ideas for integrating science concepts in other disciplines. Includes theories, teaching strategies, demonstration and laboratory techniques, and an overview of curriculum, assessment guidelines, Common Core Standards, conducting field trips, and safety considerations. Prerequisite or co-requisite: EDU 340, EDU 341,EDU 342 and one college-level science course. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 344 Children's Literature and Social Studies3
This course is designed to provide an introduction to children's literature as well as a foundation for teaching social studies. It highlights the genres of the literature, learning about and through literature, and using quality literature integrated with other content. For social studies instruction, the course examines the state standards for social studies in the areas of world and American history, geography and civics and how to use children's literature as a content source for those areas of curriculum. Prerequisite: EDU 201 and EDU 202. Fall and spring semesters and Jan Term.
EDU 350 Methods of Teaching in Middle and High School3
Candidates learn the fundamental knowledge and skills to implement standards-based instructional planning, the Common Core Standards, and to use multiple instructional strategies for teaching in secondary schools. Meets Whitworth's oral communication requirement. Prerequisite: EDU 201, EDU 202, EDU 320, junior standing and completion of at least 9 semester credits in major, or chair permission. Corequisite: EDU 351. Spring semester.
EDU 351 Middle/High School Field Experience1
Placement in a middle or high school for a field experience in teaching area. Includes working with students in groups, assisting teachers, and planning and teaching lessons. A minimum of 30 hours is required. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Prerequisite: EDU 201, EDU 202, EDU 320, junior standing and completion of at least 9 semester credits in major, or chair permission. Corequisite: EDU 350. Spring semesters and Jan Term.
EDU 361 Second-Language Acquisition3
An overview of interdisciplinary theories of how students acquire a first and an additional language informed by the fields of linguistics, psychology, sociocultural, and political studies. A view to gaining informed approaches for supporting English Learners and their access to the core curriculum. Also listed as LS 361/EDU 561 and TES 361. Fall and Spring Semesters.
EDU 362 ELL Methodology3
Application of language-acquisition theory to the teaching of limited-English-proficient students. Listening, speaking, reading and writing strategies as well as the purpose and administration of language-proficiency assessment. Also listed as EDU 562. Fall and Spring Semesters.
EDU 363 ELL Methods in Language Arts and Reading3
Content centers around the Common Core State Standards intertwined with the Washington State English Proficiency Standards. Strategies for scaffolding content reading tasks for English Learners are explored and practiced. The course also addresses the literacy needs of English Learners in their core curriculum subjects with ways that instructors of core subjects can increase content achievement while supporting literacy needs. Also listed as EDU 563. Spring semester.
EDU 364 ELL/CLD Field Experience1-3
The ELL/CLD Field Experience provides an opportunity to implement the knowledge and strategies being learned in the content ELL courses. The implementation is designed to occur during students' EDU 368/EDU 369 intercultural placements or in the students' own classrooms, if applicable. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Prerequisite: EDU 361, EDU 362 or EDU 363. Also listed as EDU 564. Fall, Jan Term, and Spring Semesters.
EDU 365 CLD Assessment & Evaluation3
Topics include issues, principles, instruments, and methods of assessment related to the education of linguistic and culturally diverse learners. Classroom, district-wide, and state instruments for language proficiency are analyzed. Performance on language proficiency instruments versus content-specific, classroom performance is explored. Overview of the Language-Learning vs. Language-Disability issues also presented. Prerequisite: EDU 361, EDU 362, or EDU 363. Also listed as EDU 565. Periodic offering.
EDU 366 Teaching English Language Learners1
An introduction to instructional strategies for teaching English Language Learners in the regular classroom and an overview of current programs and laws regarding the teaching of ELL students. Prerequisite: junior standing required. Waived with any other ELL course. Fall semester.
EDU 367 Introduction to Intercultural Education1
Examination of both personal and institutional cultural proficiency in education. The impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on academic achievement is explored along with the crucial skills for effective intercultural communication. Also included is the examination of one's own cultural values, attitudes, and beliefs as they influence instruction and assessment practices used with P-12 students in the content areas. Offered only for those pursuing a teaching certificate. Prerequisite: junior standing required; senior standing recommended. Also listed as EDU 567. Fall semester.
EDU 368 Field Immersion in Intercultural Education3
Participation in an intercultural off-campus experience at local, USA, or international educational site. Involves full school day experiences with culturally and linguistically diverse students. Includes observation, lesson planning, assisting students with special needs, tutoring, teaching, and attending professional meetings at culturally diverse sites. Except for local settings, students live in the community and participate in life of the community. Candidates prepare culturally proficient analysis of their experiences, use levels of cultural insights to interview persons of diversity, and infuse lesson plans with culturally and linguistically diverse strategies and assessments. Prerequisite: EDU 367. Jan Term and alternating May Term.
EDU 369 Field Immersion Intercultural Education3
Participation in an intercultural off-campus experience at local, USA, or international educational site. Involves full school day experiences with culturally and linguistically diverse students for art, kinesiology, music, and theatre majors. Includes observation, lesson planning, assisting students with special needs, tutoring, teaching, and attending professional meetings at culturally diverse sites. Except for local settings, students live in the community and participate in life of the community. Candidates prepare culturally proficient analysis of their experiences, use levels of cultural insights to interview persons of diversity, and infuse lesson plans with culturally and linguistically diverse strategies and assessments. Prerequisite: EDU 367. Jan Term and alternating May Term.
EDU 390H Honors Internship1-4
EDU 391H Honors Independent Study1-4
EDU 392H Honors Study Abroad1-12
This course enables honors students who participate in regular study abroad programs to receive honors credit toward their program. This course concentrates on cultural competency and reflections on critical moments in their study abroad experiences. Letter-graded.
EDU 401W Democracy, Leadership, and Schooling3
A capstone course to clarify spiritual, philosophical, social, and educational convictions as they relate to the teaching profession. Exploration of ways to translate worldview convictions into educational practice. Prerequisite: EDU 320. Also listed as LS 401W. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 410 Environmental and Sustainability Education in the K-12 Classroom3
This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to integrate environmental and sustainability education principles in the elementary, middle level or high school classroom. The primary focus of the course is to develop candidates' skills in methodology that can be used in indoor and outdoor settings to engage students in activities that promote environmental understanding and sustainability through inquiry, place-based learning, field investigation and civic engagement.
EDU 424 Early Intervention for Special Education3
Instructional methods, management strategies and interdisciplinary intervention techniques appropriate for working with children with disabilities from birth to age six in integrated settings. Includes strategies for supporting families and developing Individual Family Service Programs (IFSP). Also listed as EDS 524. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Fall Semester.
EDU 426 Intervention for Severe Communication, Sensory, and Physical Problems3
This course will examine the characteristics of individuals identified with severe disabilities, their unique educational and service delivery needs, family and community issues, and instructional strategies and supports. Methods and strategies will emphasize assessment, functional skills, adaptive behaviors, augmentative communication, generalization, and specific behavior-change procedures. Technology, trends, and evidence-based behavior analytic practices will also be taught. Also listed as EDS 526. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Spring Semester.
EDU 430 Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders3
This course will address the diagnostic criteria and defining characteristics of ASD and related disabilities. The course will also discuss characteristics of effective behavioral interventions and explore the impact of having a child with ASD on a family. Finally, students will become knowledgeable about the characteristics of verbal behavior and assess, identify, and plan for instruction regarding verbal behavior. Also listed as EDS 530. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 321. Spring Semester.
EDU 434 Early Speech, Language and Literacy3
Introduction to components of speech and language; and change involving second language acquisition whether oral or manual, with application to literacy and learning for students with disabilities. Junior/Senior standing or Graduate students. Also listed as EDS 534. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 320. Spring semester.
EDU 436 Intervention Through Positive Behavior Intervention Support3
An overview of theory, research and methods related to identifying community values and establishing school-wide Positive Behavior Support. Includes functional behavior assessment, data collection methods, interventions and behavior management strategies to respond effectively to students who exhibit severe challenging behavior. Also listed as EDS 536. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 321. Fall Semester.
EDU 438 Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Method3
Early childhood special education methods using an interdisciplinary and Activity-Based Intervention approach. Requires on-site seminar and fieldwork. Junior/Senior standing or Graduate student. Also listed as EDS 538. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDU 424. Alternate Summers.
EDU 440 Methods for Teaching Reading3
Processes of teaching reading, reading skills, reading comprehension and vocabulary development at the elementary level. Includes hands-on use of current published reading materials for planning reading lessons and an overview of Common Core Standards. This course may be taught at an off-campus location. Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341 and EDU 342. Corequisites: EDU 441 and EDU 442. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 441 Diagnosis/Intervention Reading Difficulties3
Study and use of instruments to assess reading abilities and the diagnosis and intervention of specific reading problems. Candidates assess elementary students, identify reading problems, and design and implement an intervention. This course may be taught at an off-campus location. Corequisites: EDU 440 and EDU 442. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 442 Literacy Field Experience1
Placement in an elementary school for a semester-long field experience to observe reading and language-arts lessons modeled by classroom teachers and to assess reading abilities of selected students. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Corequisite: EDU 440, EDU 441. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 443 Methods for Teaching Writing1
This course will focus on strategies for teaching and assessing writing for grades K-8. Emphasis will be on the writing process, writer's workshop, writing across the curriculum and using the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to develop prompts for the three genre expectations for elementary and middle grades. Prerequisite: EDU 201 or EDU 202.
EDU 444 Literacy Center Field Experience1-2
This class will be largely clinical in nature and will allow students pursuing a reading endorsement to have additional time to learn various intervention programs and to work individually with a struggling reader. Students will find the experience to be extremely valuable in helping them understand the nature of reading difficulties and one method for structured intervention. Application required. Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters.
EDU 453 Social Studies in Secondary School2
Overview of social studies curriculum, instruction, and assessment in middle/high school. Emphasis on Common Core Standards in the area of social studies. Prerequisite: EDU 350. Fall semester.
EDU 454 Mathematics in Secondary School2
Overview of mathematics curriculum, instruction, and assessment in middle/high school. Emphasis on Common Core Standards in mathematics. Prerequisite: EDU 350. Fall semester.
EDU 455 Science in Secondary School2
Overview of science curriculum, instruction, assessment, and classroom/lab safety in middle/ high school. Emphasis on Common Core Standards in science. Prerequisite: EDU 350. Fall semester.
EDU 458 Content Area Reading and Writing2
Strategies for improving comprehension of content area materials, adapting lessons for a wide range of learners, analyzing the appropriateness of written materials, and connecting writing to the content area. Also listed as EDU 548 (students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 461 Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Elementary School3
The purpose of this course is to prepare elementary teacher candidates to use appropriate instructional assessments, differentiation techniques, and classroom management strategies for K-8 classrooms. Prerequisites: Junior standing and EDU 340, EDU 341, & EDU 342. Corequisite: EDU 440. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 465 Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Middle and High School3
The purpose of this course is to prepare secondary teacher candidates to use appropriate instructional assessments, differentiation techniques, and classroom management strategies for 4th-12th grade classrooms. Prerequisites: Junior standing and EDU 350 & EDU 351. Corequisite: EDU 485. Fall semester.
EDU 472 Professional Issues in Elementary Education1
Seminar on professional responsibilities, membership in professional organizations, faith and values related to teaching and parent/community relations. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 474 Elementary Student Teaching Seminar1
Professional portfolio development, issues in student teaching, documentation of positive impact on student learning, and certification and job placement. Fall and spring semesters.
EDU 476 Professional Issues in Secondary Education1
Public-school laws, professional rights and responsibilities, membership in professional organizations, faith and values related to teaching and parent/community relations. Spring semesters.
EDU 478 Secondary Student-Teaching Seminar1
Professional portfolio development, issues in student teaching, documentation of positive impact on student learning, and certification and job placement. Spring semesters.
EDU 480 Field Experience (Level Specified)1-6
May require transportation to an off-campus field experience.
EDU 481 Special-Education Practicum, Early Childhood or K-81
A teaching-assistant practicum of 30 hours in a special-education classroom. Concurrent enrollment permissible in EDU 483, Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-8. Application is required. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. Also listed as EDS 581. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisites: EDU 320 and EDU 321. Fall, Spring, Jan Term, and Summer Semesters.
EDU 482 Special-Education Practicum, Middle Or High School1
A teaching-assistant practicum of 30 hours in a special-education classroom. Concurrent enrollment permissible in EDU 484, Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Middle/High School. Application is required. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. Also listed as EDS 582. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program.) Prerequisite: EDU 320 and EDU 321. Fall, Spring, Jan Term, and Summer Semesters.
EDU 483 Advanced Special-Education Practicum: Early Childhood or K-84
A practicum of 120 hours in a special-education classroom under teacher supervision. Application and permission required. Also listed as EDS 583. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Pre- or Co-requisite: EDU 481. Fall, Spring, Jan Term, and Summer Semesters.
EDU 484 Advanced Special-Education Practicum, Middle or High School4
A practicum of 120 hours in a special education classroom under teacher supervision. Application and permission required. Also listed as EDS 584. (Students must register for graduate level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program). Pre- or Co-requisite: EDU 482. Fall, Spring, Jan Term, and Summer Semesters.
EDU 485 Middle/High School Field Experience1
Placement in a middle or high school in teaching area immediately prior to the student teaching semester. Includes working with students in groups, assisting teachers, and planning and teaching lessons. A minimum of 30 hours is required. May require transportation to an off-campus field experience. Corequisite: EDU 465. Fall semester.
EDU 490H Internship1-4
EDU 491H Honors Independent Study1-4
EDU 493 Directed Teaching, Middle School and Special Education11
EDU 494 Directed Teaching, High School and Special Education11
EDU 496 Directed Teaching, Elementary Level11
EDU 497 Directed Teaching, Middle-School Level11
EDU 498 Directed Teaching, High-School Level11

Requirements for Elementary Education Major, B.A.

and Endorsement (K-8)

(currently leads to K-8 certification in Washington state)

All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. See course descriptions for prerequisites, co-requisites, and class-standing information.

Note: An ESOL endorsement may be required in certain states, such as California, Florida and Nevada. Students are responsible for knowing state requirements for ESOL endorsements.

I. Professional Program: Preliminary (5)

EDU 201Educational Psychology for Children and Adolescents3
or EDU 201H Honors Educational Psychology
EDU 202Exploring Teaching1
EDU 203Field Experience1

Admission to the Whitworth Teacher Education Program is required before a student begins upper-division courses.

II. Professional Program: Upper Division

A. Teacher-Education Courses (35)

EDU 320Exceptional Learners and Inclusion (This is the first upper-division course taken in the program.)3
EDU 321Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
EDU 340K-8: General and Language Arts Methods Curriculum *3
EDU 341Mathematics: Elementary/Middle School Methods (K-9) *2
EDU 342Elementary Curriculum Field Experience *1
EDU 343Science: K-9 Methods and Assessment2
EDU 344Children's Literature and Social Studies3
EDU 366Teaching English Language Learners **1
EDU 367Introduction to Intercultural Education1
EDU 368Field Immersion in Intercultural Education ***3
EDU 401WDemocracy, Leadership, and Schooling3
EDU 440Methods for Teaching Reading ****3
EDU 441Diagnosis/Intervention Reading Difficulties ****3
EDU 442Literacy Field Experience ****1
EDU 461Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Elementary School3
*

These courses constitute the elementary curriculum block and are taken concurrently.

**

Waived with any other ESOL course

***

Art, kinesiology, music and theatre majors take EDU 369 instead of EDU 368.

****

 These courses constitute the elementary literacy block and are taken concurrently in the semester following the curriculum block.

B. Non-Education Required Courses (22)

MA 221Math for Elementary School Teachers I3
MA 222Math for Elementary School Teachers II3
NS 101Earth and Sky3
BI 102Introductory Biology3
One of the following:3
The Atlantic World
The United States in a Global Context
Rise of Modern America: 1877-1945
Slavery and the Civil War
One of the following:3
American National Politics
American Political Parties
AR 344Elementary Art: Curriculum and Methods1
KIN 344Curriculum and Methods: Elementary Health, Fitness and PE1
MU 344Elementary Music: Music and Movement1
TA 344Theatre Across the Curriculum1

C. Academic Area (20+)

A certification plan with an academic emphasis must be set up with an advisor during the sophomore year or upon admission to the program, and must include a minimum of 20 semester credits in one approved endorsement area. Students are encouraged to complete endorsements in their academic areas. Reading may not be used for this academic area. See the Whitworth Department of Teacher Education for a list of approved academic areas and endorsement information, or refer to the department’s website.

III. Professional Program: Senior Seminars and Student Teaching (13)

Admission to student teaching is required before a student enrolls in senior seminars. Application must be submitted one semester in advance of student teaching.
EDU 472Professional Issues in Elementary Education1
EDU 474Elementary Student Teaching Seminar1
EDU 496Directed Teaching, Elementary Level11

Note: Application for a Washington State Teaching Certificate, passing student teaching, passing a state content area exam, and passing a teacher performance assessment are required for program completion (teacher certification).

Requirements for Secondary Certification

All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. See course descriptions for prerequisites, co-requisites, and class-standing information.

Note: An ESOL endorsement may be required in certain states, such as California, Florida and Nevada. Students are responsible for knowing state requirements for ESOL endorsements.

I. Professional Program: Preliminary (5)

EDU 201Educational Psychology for Children and Adolescents3
or EDU 201H Honors Educational Psychology
EDU 202Exploring Teaching1
EDU 203Field Experience1

Initial admission to the Whitworth Teacher Education Program is required before a student begins upper-division courses.

II. Professional Program: Upper Division

A. Teacher Education Courses (26-27)

EDU 320Exceptional Learners and Inclusion (This is the first upper-division course taken in the program.)3
EDU 329Principles of Behavior for Mid/Secondary Classroom3
EDU 350Methods of Teaching in Middle and High School *3
EDU 351Middle/High School Field Experience *1
EDU 366Teaching English Language Learners **1
EDU 367Introduction to Intercultural Education1
EDU 368Field Immersion in Intercultural Education ***3
EDU 401WDemocracy, Leadership, and Schooling3
EDU 458Content Area Reading and Writing2
EDU 465Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Middle and High School ****3
EDU 485Middle/High School Field Experience ****1
Methods course in each endorsed subject area2-3
*

These courses taken concurrently.

**

Waived with any other ESOL course

***

 Art, kinesiology, music and theatre majors take EDU 369 instead of EDU 368.

****

 These courses are taken concurrently.

B. Professional Program: Content in the Teaching Area

An academic major (approved by both the major department and the department of teacher education) in an approved area is required. See department of teacher education for information regarding endorsements, or see each department’s section in this catalog.

III. Professional Program: Senior Seminars and Student Teaching (13)

Admission to student-teaching is required before a student enrolls in senior seminars.
Application must be submitted one semester in advance to student teaching.
EDU 476Professional Issues in Secondary Education1
EDU 478Secondary Student-Teaching Seminar1
One of the following:11
Directed Teaching, Middle School and Special Education
Directed Teaching, High School and Special Education
Directed Teaching, Middle-School Level
Directed Teaching, High-School Level

Note: Secondary candidates seeking endorsements in art, kinesiology, music and theatre must complete an additional practicum experience at the alternate level. Application for Washington State Teaching Certificate, passing student teaching, passing a state content area exam, and passing a teacher performance assessment are required for program completion.

Requirements for a Special Education Major and Endorsement (34)

All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. Must be completed in combination with a dual major in elementary education or in an endorsable subject area major that can be taught with secondary certification.
Meets Washington state endorsement requirements for special education (P-12).
Coursework:
EDU 320Exceptional Learners and Inclusion3
EDU 321Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
EDU 322Assessment and IEP Planning3
EDU 323Intervention for Academic Learning Problems3
EDU 424Early Intervention for Special Education3
EDU 426Intervention for Severe Communication, Sensory, and Physical Problems3
EDU 430Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders3
EDU 436Intervention Through Positive Behavior Intervention Support3
Fieldwork:
EDU 481Special-Education Practicum, Early Childhood or K-81
EDU 482Special-Education Practicum, Middle Or High School1
EDU 483Advanced Special-Education Practicum: Early Childhood or K-84
EDU 484Advanced Special-Education Practicum, Middle or High School4
Electives available but not required:
Introduction to Sign Language & the Deaf
Sign Language & the Deaf II
Social and Emotional Components of Giftedness
Early Speech, Language and Literacy
Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Method

Environmental/Sustainability Education (ESE) Specialty Endorsement (K-12)

Completion of the minor in environmental studies and taking EDU 343 Science: K-9 Methods and Assessment or EDU 455 Science in the Secondary School and taking EDU 410 Environmental and Sustainability Education in the K-12 Classroom as two of the electives in the minor, will prepare a student for an endorsement in environmental/sustainability education (K-12). The Environmental Studies minor adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the development of environmental literacy and competency integrating natural science, social science, and humanities to attain a balanced education that encourages careful stewardship of the earth.  Please see the Education department for advising.

Early Childhood Special Education Endorsement (P-3)

Completion of the major/endorsement in special education, combined with two additional courses, EDU 434 Early Speech, Language and Literacy and EDU 438 Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Methods (or equivalent coursework), and Advanced Practicum in an early intervention or preschool special education setting will prepare a student for an endorsement in early childhood special education (P-3). Please see the Special Education Coordinator for advising.

Deaf Education Specialty Endorsement (P-12)

Completion of the major in special education, combined with a set of required courses from Spokane Falls Community College’s Interpreters Program (or equivalent coursework), EDU 434 Early Speech, Language and Literacy, and Advanced Practicum in a deaf education setting will prepare a student for a specialty endorsement in deaf education (P-12). Please see the Special Education Coordinator for a transcript evaluation and advising.

Requirements for a Special Education Minor (17)

This minor is not sufficient for an endorsement in special education in Washington state.
EDU 320Exceptional Learners and Inclusion3
EDU 321Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
EDU 322Assessment and IEP Planning3
EDU 323Intervention for Academic Learning Problems3
One of the following:1
Special-Education Practicum, Early Childhood or K-8
Special-Education Practicum, Middle Or High School
One of the following:4
Advanced Special-Education Practicum: Early Childhood or K-8
Advanced Special-Education Practicum, Middle or High School

Requirements for an English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Minor and Endorsement (P-12) (17-19)

All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. Formerly known as English Language Learner (ELL).
Note: An ESOL endorsement may be required in certain states, such as California, Florida and Nevada. Students are responsible for knowing state requirements for ESOL endorsements.
Meets Washington state endorsement requirements for ESOL (P-12).
EDU 361Second-Language Acquisition3
EDU 362ELL Methodology3
EDU 363ELL Methods in Language Arts and Reading3
EDU 364ELL/CLD Field Experience *1-3
EDU 367Introduction to Intercultural Education1
One of the following:3
Early Speech, Language and Literacy
Structure and Development of the English Language
Introduction to Linguistics
Methods for Teaching Languages, K-12
One of the following **:3
Intercultural Communication
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
**or any approved non-education course meeting the university's American diversity or global perspectives requirement.
Competency in a second language; one of the following:
One year of residence in a non-English-speaking country
One year of Peace Corps training and service
Student is a native speaker of a language other than English
Eight semester credits of college coursework in a second language
*

May be met as part of other field experience, such as EDU 368 or student teaching.

Requirements for a Reading Endorsement (P-12) (16-17)

(Meets Washington state reading endorsement requirement (P-12))
EDU 344Children's Literature and Social Studies3
EDU 440Methods for Teaching Reading3
EDU 441Diagnosis/Intervention Reading Difficulties3
EDU 442Literacy Field Experience1
EDU 443Methods for Teaching Writing1
One of the following with advisor approval:2-3
Intervention for Academic Learning Problems
ELL Methods in Language Arts and Reading
Literacy Center Field Experience (must register for 2 credits)
Content Area Reading and Writing
One of the following with advisor approval:3
Early Speech, Language and Literacy
Writing II
English Methods and Adolescent Literature
Structure and Development of the English Language

Requirements for Minor in Reading Instruction (18-20)

Complete the above requirements for the reading endorsement and one additional course from the endorsement electives selected (with advisor approval). Electives may include an additional new course developed in consultation with the School of Education.

Requirements for a Middle Level Mathematics Endorsement (4-9) (39)

In combination with either Elementary or Secondary Certification courses. All endorsement subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. Meets Washington state Middle Level Mathematics endorsement requirement (4-9).
MA 150Pre-Calculus4
MA 171Calculus I4
MA 221Math for Elementary School Teachers I3
MA 222Math for Elementary School Teachers II3
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
EDU 329Principles of Behavior for Mid/Secondary Classroom3
One of the following:2
Mathematics: Elementary/Middle School Methods (K-9)
Mathematics in Secondary School
One of the following:3
Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Elementary School
Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Middle and High School
One of the following:11
Directed Teaching, Elementary Level
Directed Teaching, Middle-School Level
Directed Teaching, High-School Level

Requirements for a Middle Level Science Endorsement (4-9) (47)

In combination with either Elementary or Secondary Certification courses. All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements. Meets Washington state Middle Level Science endorsement requirement (4-9).
BI 140
140L
General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution
and General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution Lab
4
BI 141
141L
General Biology II:Organismal Diversity
and General Biology II:Organismal Diversity Lab
4
One of the following with corresponding lab:4
Introduction to Chemistry
and Introduction to Chemistry Lab
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Lab
One of the following with corresponding lab:4
Bioorganic Chemistry
and Bioorganic Chemistry Lab
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Lab
CH 325LCommunity Chemistry Outreach1
PS 151
151L
General Physics I
and General Physics I Lab
4
PS 153
153L
General Physics II
and General Physics II Lab
4
NS 101Earth and Sky3
EDU 329Principles of Behavior for Mid/Secondary Classroom3
One of the following:2
Science: K-9 Methods and Assessment
Science in Secondary School
One of the following:3
Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Elementary School
Assessment, Management, and Differentiation for Middle and High School
One of the following:11
Directed Teaching, Elementary Level
Directed Teaching, Middle-School Level
Directed Teaching, High-School Level

Important Notes for All Undergraduate Teacher Education Students

  1. Requirements for Washington state teacher certification, endorsements, and highly qualified teacher status (NCLB) are subject to change. Therefore, all teaching areas and programs must be approved by the Whitworth Department of Teacher Education.
  2. Admission to the teacher education program and student-teaching program must be approved by the department of teacher education.
  3. Full admission to the teacher education program requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 at Whitworth. See department for admission guidelines.
  4. Application for student teaching must be submitted one semester in advance. Admission to student teaching is required before a student enrolls in student teaching courses.
  5. WSP/FBI fingerprint clearance and completion of the Washington State e-certification application is required of each student prior to beginning the EDU 342 or EDU 351 field experiences.
  6. Admission to the department of teacher education and student teaching do not guarantee state certification.
  7. Students cannot enroll in upper-division courses without first being admitted to the teacher-education program.
  8. All grades in courses used for teacher certification and endorsements must be “C” or better. Courses that apply toward certification may not be taken P/NC.
  9. Students seeking secondary certification must complete a major in an academic area approved by the department of teacher education.
  10. Students seeking elementary certification must complete a minimum of 20 semester credits in an approved endorsement area.
  11. An application for a Washington State Teaching Certificate is required for program completion.
  12. Students are responsible for information in the certification handbook, which is available on the department website.
  13. Passage of the WEST-B or equivalent score on ACT or SAT is required for Benchmark II of the program. Passage of the WEST-E or NES in each area of endorsement is required for Washington State certification.
  14. Students must have taken and passed the WEST-E or NES in their major before they may begin student teaching.
  15. Passage of the edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment) is required for Washington State certification.
  16. Successful candidates receive a Washington State Teaching Certificate. Students planning to seek certification in another state must research certification and testing requirements for that state and are encouraged to do so early in their program.
  17. An ESOL endorsement may be required in certain states, such as California, Florida and Nevada. Students are responsible for knowing state requirements for ESOL endorsements.

Post-Baccalaureate Certification Programs

Two teacher certification programs are available at Whitworth for people who already possess undergraduate degrees: (1) the Evening Teacher Certification Program and (2) the Master in Teaching Degree Program.

The Whitworth Evening Teacher Certification Program, a collaborative effort between the School of Education and Whitworth Continuing Studies, allows adults who work full time to complete a teacher certification program in a cohort-based accelerated evening and Saturday format. The program is designed to prepare elementary certificated teachers; however, candidates wishing to obtain secondary certification can complete a program consisting of a combination of traditional day and accelerated evening classes. Within the ETC program, post-baccalaureate students may choose between the master of education and certification-only tracks. Students can enroll in the 500 level of designated courses and apply up to 18 ETC semester credits as electives if accepted to Whitworth’s M.Ed. program. For transferability, application must be made within four years of ETC program completion. Cohorts begin in August and February. For more information, please see the ETC program description in the Adult Degree Programs/Continuing Studies section of this catalog or contact an ETC advisor at 509.777.3222.

The Whitworth Master in Teaching Degree Program allows students to pursue a master’s degree and teacher certification concurrently. Whitworth was the first university in Washington state to receive approval for an MIT program after state legislation permitted this option. This is an intensive, selective, full-time day-school graduate program that begins in June and continues for 14 months, culminating in August of the following year. Both elementary and secondary certification options are available in the MIT program. Application to the program must be made four to six months prior to the starting date. (See graduate section of this catalog.) For more information about the MIT program, contact the Assistant Director at 509.777.3769.

Evening Teacher Certification: Degree Completion in Elementary Education

Courses are limited to students enrolled in the Whitworth Evening Teacher Certification Program, a collaborative effort between the School of Education and Whitworth Continuing Studies. Students can earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education along with Washington state residency teacher certification. Those currently holding a college degree can complete certification requirements only, or certification in conjunction with a Master of Education degree if accepted to the Whitworth Graduate Studies in Education Program. For complete program and course descriptions, see the Adult Degree Programs/Continuing Studies section of this catalog.

Dean

BARBARA SANDERS

Chair

ANN TEBERG

Professors

RANDALL MICHAELIS (ADMIN)BARB SANDERS

Associate professors

LISA LAURIERJANN LEPPIENKATHRYN PICANCOFLINT SIMONSENANN TEBERG

Assistant professors

KIRA AUSTINKEITH LAMBERTJAMES UHLENKOTT (VISITING)ANNE WILCOX

Instructor

DON COMI