George Whitworth Honors

George Whitworth Honors

GEORGE WHITWORTH HONORS PROGRAM PHILOSOPHY AND VALUES

The Whitworth Honors Program is rooted in the following principles that shape the program and reflect Whitworth’s core values:

  • Academic excellence: Requirements for credit granted in honors-program learning experiences will exceed the academic expectations of most Whitworth courses.
  • Active and collaborative learning: Learning experiences are characterized by joint intellectual effort among students, or between students and faculty in pursuit of deeper knowledge and understanding. Learning experiences in the honors curriculum are designed to require active participation and a high degree of self-direction from students.
  • Christian mission: The honors program includes experiences with a faith-learning integration component.
  • Community: Registration for honors program offerings is elective and open to all Whitworth students. When space is limited, priority will be given to honors students, assuming their timely registration.
  • Educational breadth: Honors graduates must complete academic-enrichment experiences across the curriculum (not just in proximity to their major).
  • Preparation for vocation: Honors experiences are designed to provide a high level of preparation for post-baccalaureate educational and/or career opportunities.

The primary aim of the program is to provide academic benefits by deepening student engagement, defined as learning that adds “depth, complexity, and novelty.”

  1. Depth is the level of mastery and understanding of the material presented. Students in the honors program will study course content more extensively or in greater depth than in typical college courses. This leads toward the student's greater insight through the discovery of detail, patterns and trends.
  2. Complexity is the level of thought and processing involved in an activity. Dealing with complexity helps students to understand concepts at a higher level and to see the interrelationship of concepts.
  3. Novelty refers to the unique personal experience of the student. S/he may study something that is not a part of the regular curriculum but that is of interest to him or her. Self-directed study leads toward heightened individuality and expansion of personal belief systems.

A secondary aim of the program is to provide students a range of experiences to enhance their preparation for post-baccalaureate study and vocations.

GEORGE WHITWORTH HONORS PROGRAM

The George Whitworth Honors Program allows high-achieving, motivated students who are admitted with honors to be eligible for a menu of challenging academic-enrichment experiences over their four years at Whitworth. Program components benefit students differently, depending upon their particular interests and learning styles. The strength of the program is that the student directs himself/herself through a diverse set of learning experiences across multiple disciplines. These experiences may include honors general education or interdisciplinary courses, honors courses within a major, advanced seminars, honors creative projects, honors research, honors study abroad, and honors internships. Eligibility for priority enrollment in many honors courses is dependent upon the student's GPA. Eligibility to participate in certain types of honors experience (e.g., research, internship, performance) is by faculty approval, based on applications that demonstrate preparation related to the honors area.

Eligibility to Graduate with George Whitworth Honors

Incoming first-year students with honors at entrance automatically qualify for the honors program (with 1870 SAT and 3.75 cumulative high school GPA). Honors students must register to be officially enrolled in the program, and must maintain a 3.75 GPA to remain in the program. To graduate as a George Whitworth Scholar, a student must complete at least 18 credits with a grade of "C" or higher within the honors program, with at least six of those credits in upper-division courses, seminars, research, etc.

Requirements for George Whitworth Honors (18)

HN 200HHonors Seminar I: Vocation & Excellence1
HN 300HSeminar II: Community Project1
One of the following:4
Western Civ. I: Christian (Honors) Worldview Perspective
Western Civiiliation II: (Honors) The Rationalist Worldview with Films
Western Civ III Honors
The other courses in the program must be earned in at least three of the following five categories: *12
A. Honors courses or seminars
B. Honors research
C. Honors internship
D. Honors off-campus course or program
E. Honors creative project
*

 No more than nine credits can be from one department.  Honors courses cannot be taken for P/NC, but can be audited, but honors course that is audited does not count toward the honors requirements.

To be a George Whitworth Scholar, a student must graduate with at least a 3.75 cumulative GPA.  Students who do not meet these requirements will still be enriched by these experiences, but will not graduate with George Whitworth honors. Honors graduates will become members of the George Whitworth Society upon graduation

Eligibility to Graduate with George Whitworth Honors

To graduate as a George Whitworth Scholar, a student must complete at least 15 credits with a grade of "C" or higher within the honors program, with at least six of those credits in upper-division courses, seminars, research, etc. No more than nine honors credits can be earned within a single department. In addition, honors credits must be earned in at least four of the following categories:

A. Honors courses or seminars
B. Honors research
C. Honors internship
D. Honors off-campus program
E. Honors creative project
F. Honors d-group in a Core/Worldview Studies course (at 4 credits per course)

Note: Honors courses cannot be taken for P/NC, but can be audited.  An honors course that is audited does not count toward the honors requirements.

To be a George Whitworth Scholar, a student must graduate with at least a 3.75 cumulative GPA and be in the top 20 percent of his or her major(s). Students who do not meet these requirements will still be enriched by these experiences, but will not graduate with George Whitworth honors. Honors graduates will become members of the George Whitworth Society upon graduation.

Following is a partial list of honors offerings 

CH 120H – Chemistry and Art (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Deanna Ojennus

CO 150H - Western Civilization I: Christian Worldview Perspective (Fall and Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Arlin Migliazzo

CO 250H - Western Civilization II: The Rationalist Worldview (Fall and Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Leonard Oakland

CO 350H - Western Civilization III: Applied Ethics, Public Policy and Worldviews (Fall and Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Kamesh Sankaran

CS 396H - How to Make Darn-Near Anything (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Peter Tucker

EDU 201H - Honors Educational Psychology (Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  James Uhlenkott

EL 115H - Reading in Action (Fall semesters).  Professor/contact:  LuElla D’Amico

EL 340H - Writing in Virtual Worlds (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Jessica Clements

EL 396H - Whitworth Life: Audio Storytelling (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Nicole Sheets

EL 422H – Joyce & Woolf Seminar (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Casey Andrews

FR 498H – World Languages & Cultures Capstone (Fall & Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Jennifer Brown

GE 125H – Freshmen Seminar (Fall semester).  Professor/contact:  Doug Sugano

HI 427H – Gender & Identity Formation (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Rafaela Acevedo-Field

HN 200H - Honors Seminar I:  Vocation and Excellence (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Bendi Benson Schrambacch 

HN 300H - Honors Seminar II:  Community Project (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Doug Sugano

HN 400H - Whitworth TED (Fall and Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Doug Sugano

HU 226H– Arthurian Legends in French Literature (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Bendi Benson Schrambach

JMC 126H - Writing for Digital Media (Jan term).  Professor/contact:  Erica Salkin

KIN 219H – Sport and Film (Jan term).  Professor/contact:  Kirk Westre

PH 329H - God, Knowledge, and Language (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Nate King

PY 499H - Advanced Senior Thesis (Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Patricia Bruininks

SN 427H – Gender & Identity Formation (Periodic).  Professor/contact:  Katherine Karr-Cornejo

SN 498H – World Languages & Cultures Capstone (Fall and Spring semesters).  Professor/contact:  Jennifer Brown

SP 196H – Honors Interpersonal Communication (Jan term, even years).  Professor/contact:  Ronald Pyle

TH 131H – Encountering the Covenantal God (Spring semester, even years).  Professor/contact:  Karin Heller