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Political Science

http://www.whitworth.edu/politicalscience

Poltical ScienceThe Whitworth Political Science Department strives to embody the university’s education of mind and heart through excellent teaching, open and robust debate, active scholarship and personal mentoring. Our goal is to prepare students for careers in government and politics, law, humanitarian work, teaching, research and peacemaking, as well as for work in related fields, such as business and missions. The department is committed to providing students with the political knowledge and skills that will enable them to assume responsibility from the local level to the global community. Through the study of political theory and law, the analysis of a variety of political systems, internships and off-campus study, and rigorous research projects, faculty members challenge students to develop both the tools and the vision for understanding, nurturing and transforming the society in which they live. All of our courses are informed by a commitment to justice and reconciliation as articulated by the great political thinkers throughout history and, especially, as defined by the principles of the Christian faith.

The learning outcomes of this major prepare students in the following ways:

  1. With regard to knowledge, political science students will do the following:
     
    • gain competency in the primary sub-fields of political science: American, comparative, international relations and theory/philosophy;
    • develop an understanding of citizenship in the local, national and global community;
    • understand the role of government and also the way nongovernmental actors (individuals, groups and institutions) can function in society to promote or undermine the common good.
       
  2. With regard to skills, political science students will become proficient in quantitative and qualitative research and analysis, written communication (policy papers, legal positions, literature reviews, and research papers), and oral communication (the ability to speak and listen, skills essential for public discourse). Above all, students will learn to exercise their skills as responsible citizens and as leaders in government, the private sector, education, and the community of faith.
     
  3. With regard to faith and values, political science students will learn civil and global responsibility, principled pluralism, and respect for the common good rather than self-interest. In addition, students will be able to articulate the philosophical or religious foundations of their political commitments, and they will be able to express those commitments in ways that are appropriate in a multicultural and multi-faith society and world.

Requirements for a Cross-Cultural Studies Major, Political Science Emphasis, B.A. (51)

PO 102American National Politics3
PO 151International Relations3
PO 240Comparative Politics4
PO 498WSenior Seminar3
Courses of study in culture and language other than the student’s own. (Courses should be in sociology, history, political science, literature or the arts, or in the established courses of Whitworth semester-abroad programs. Courses not on the following list may count for the major if approved by the cross-cultural studies advisor.)
Fine Arts and Humanities6
Chinese Gardens and Temples
Precolumbian Art and Architecture
Modern Latin American Art
Modern Global Literature
Introduction to Linguistics
Advanced Oral French in Guadeloupe
Latin American Short Story I
Latin American Short Story II
Survey of Spanish Literature I
Survey of Spanish Literature II
Advanced Oral Spanish in Mexico
Area Studies9
Political History of Beijing
Cultural Odyssey of China
Latin American Culture and Civilization
Political History of Beijing
Cultural Odyssey of China
History of Vietnam War
History of Latin America
Cultural History of China and Japan
Modern China and East Asia
Colonialism and Globalization
Medieval Russia: Mongols and Madmen
The French Revolution
African Life and Culture
Latin American Politics
Peace and Conflict in Ireland
Contemporary Africa
Contemporary South Africa
Contemporary China and East Asia
Globalization in Southeast Asia
Modern Russia and the Soviet Union
Sociology of Middle-Eastern Society
Selected interdisciplinary and special-emphasis courses6
Environment and Society
Economic Development
Nonviolent Defense and Conflict Resolution
International Political Economy
International Development
Revolution in History
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
World Religions
One additional course chosen from any listed above.3
Students pursuing a cross-cultural studies major must complete at least 10 of their 50 credits through a foreign-study experience.
Foreign Language14
A four-course sequence in second- and third-year-level language courses. (Where language offerings are limited, students may complete the total credits in a combination of two languages, as approved by an advisor.)

 

Requirements for an International Studies Major, Political Science Emphasis, B.A. (46)

EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
PO 102American National Politics3
PO 151International Relations3
PO 240Comparative Politics4
PO 498WSenior Seminar3
See math prerequisites for EC 211
Six semester credits of foreign language6
(at the intermediate level in Chinese or Japanese, or at the advanced (300+) level in German, French or Spanish)
Four courses in regional studies (two-course sequence recommended):12
Political History of Beijing
Cultural Odyssey of China
Latin American Culture and Civilization
Political History of Beijing
Cultural Odyssey of China
History of Latin America
Cultural History of China and Japan
Modern China and East Asia
Modern Russia and the Soviet Union
The French Revolution
African Life and Culture
Peace and Conflict in Ireland
Contemporary Africa
Contemporary South Africa
Contemporary China and East Asia
Globalization in Southeast Asia
Sociology of Middle-Eastern Society
Latin American Politics
Three courses in theory, general historical studies or political issues:9
Environment and Society
Colonialism and Globalization
U.S. Foreign Policy in Film
History of Vietnam War
Nonviolent Defense and Conflict Resolution
History of Vietnam War
Gender, Politics and Law
International Political Economy
Marxism and the Socialist World
International Development
Revolution in History
American Foreign Policy
One additional course from above3
Students pursuing an international studies major must complete at least 3 of their 46 credits through a foreign study experience.

 

Requirements for a Peace Studies Major, BA (46)

Foundations for Peace Studies13
American National Politics
International Relations
Comparative Politics
Nonviolent Defense and Conflict Resolution
Religious Ideals, Social Values and Peace3
One of the following:
Ethics
Biblical Theme of Shalom
National and Global Sources of Conflict, War, Revolution and Peace6
Two of the following:
Holocaust Literature
World at War: 1900-1945
History of Latin America
History of Vietnam War
Latin American Politics
History of Vietnam War
Contemporary Africa
Contemporary South Africa
Contemporary China and East Asia
Revolution in History
American Foreign Policy
Sociology of Middle-Eastern Society
Economics, Environmental and Social Sources of Conflict and Peace6
Two of the following
Economics of Social Issues
or EC 345
Economics of Social Issues
Environment and Society
Economic Development
Conflict Mediation
Poverty and Community Development
Globalization, Ecology, Gender in Central America
Development Strategies in Central America
International Political Economy
International Development
Population, Environment and Society
Deviance, Crime and Criminal Justice
Social Stratification: Power, Prestige And Wealth
Cities and Urban Life
Intro Women's and Gender Studies
Ideologies, Identities, Political Structures and Peace6
Two of the following:
Identity, Race, and Power in American Life
African Life and Culture
Law and Society
Peace and Conflict in Ireland
Gender, Politics and Law
Marxism and the Socialist World
Race and Ethnicity
Small Group Communication
Intercultural Communication
World Religions
Peacemaking in Practice3
One of the following:
Senior Seminar
Making Change: Social Intervention Strategies
Two additional courses chosen from any listed above6
Internship Required3
Internship
Note: Study abroad is strongly recommended.

Requirements for a Political Science Major, B.A. (41-43)

PO 102American National Politics3
PO 151International Relations3
PO 240Comparative Politics4
PO 498WSenior Seminar3
Three courses in American politics:9
U.S. Foreign Policy in Film
History of Vietnam War
Law and Society
Politics, Media and Pop Culture
American Political Parties
Poverty and Community Development
History of Vietnam War
The American Presidency
Modern Congress
Gender, Politics and Law
American Constitutional Law
American Foreign Policy
Two courses in political theory:6
Environment and Society
Gender, Politics and Law
Social-Political Philosophy
American Constitutional Law
Marxism and the Socialist World
Western Political Thought
American Political Thought
Two courses in comparative and international politics:6
African Life and Culture
U.S. Foreign Policy in Film
History of Vietnam War
Political History of Beijing
Cultural Odyssey of China
Latin American Politics
History of Vietnam War
Peace and Conflict in Ireland
Contemporary Africa
Contemporary South Africa
Contemporary China and East Asia
Globalization in Southeast Asia
International Political Economy
Modern Russia and the Soviet Union
International Development
Revolution in History
American Foreign Policy
International Law
Two additional courses in political science6
An internship is required1-3
Internship

Pre-Law Advising

Pre-law advisor: Julia Stronks

Whitworth’s rigorous liberal arts education is ideal training for law school and the legal profession. Recent graduates have been accepted into law schools at Yale, Stanford, Duke, Harvard, University of Michigan, Cornell and University of Washington, and Whitworth alumni are working at some of the most successful law firms in Washington and around the United States. Pre-law students are welcome to select any liberal arts major, but they may find the most relevant law school preparation in programs offered through the departments of history, political science, literature, philosophy, economics, sociology, psychology, mathematics and science. Regardless of students’ majors, Whitworth prepares its graduates to succeed in law school by equipping them with a broad knowledge base and strong analytic, critical-thinking and communication skills. In addition, the pre-law advisor actively assists students in developing an appropriate course plan and making arrangements for taking the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) and applying for law school. While Whitworth does not have a designated pre-law curriculum, the following courses are recommended:

BU 240Business Law3
JMC 402Mass Media Law3
PH 201Logic3
PH 221Ethics3
PO 102American National Politics3
PO 223Law and Society3
PO 364WAmerican Constitutional Law3

Note: Study abroad is strongly recommended.

Requirements for a Minor in Community Engagement and Transformation (18)

TH 256, 356Biblical Theme of Shalom3
At least one of the following:3
Poverty and Community Development
Psychology of Poverty and Social Class
Cities and Urban Life
Approved engagement electives12
See department for current electives meeting this criteria

Requirements for a Minor in Peace Studies (15)

PO 297Nonviolent Defense and Conflict Resolution3
Four approved peace-studies courses12

Requirements for a Minor in Political Science (18)

PO 102American National Politics3
PO 151International Relations3
One course in American politics3
One course in international politics3
Two approved upper-division courses6

Courses

PO 102 American National Politics3
Overview of founding principles, political culture decision-making processes and institutions of American government.
PO 104 Political History of Beijing3
Provides historical understanding of the political and social history of China's capital city, Beijing. Listed in both political science and history.
PO 105 Cultural Odyssey of China3
Provides historical understanding of the cultural and religious history of China through its imperial and modern eras. Listed in both political science and history.
PO 140 African Life and Culture3
Examination of representative African peoples, countries, lifestyles, and beliefs. Topics covered will include media coverage of Africa, traditional and modernizing influences on African lives today, Africans as global citizens, health, gender, religion and rites of passage. Jan Term.
PO 151 International Relations3
This course is a balance between understanding the key issues in international relations and the perspectives that help explain those issues. Foreign policy behavior of major states, traditional and recent security issues, cause of war and conflicts, impact of independence. Fall and spring semesters.
PO 196 Topics in Political Science1-3
Selected topics in political science. Periodic offering.
PO 205 U.S. Foreign Policy in Film3
An analysis of the history, processes and institutions involved in making U.S. foreign policy. The global response to U.S. foreign policy is also prominently featured. Case studies drawn from film where IR and Foreign Policy are emphasized. Periodic offering, Jan Term.
PO 209 History of Vietnam War3
The causes of America's involvement in the war in Vietnam, the military strategies employed, the political decision-making, and the effects of the war on American society will be examined. Particular attention will be paid to the lessons of war. Also listed as PO 309. Periodic offering.
PO 223 Law and Society3
The role of law in society. Participants in the legal system (lawyers, judges, police, juries), study of the structure of the judicial system, trial procedures. Periodic offering.
PO 224 Conflict Mediation3
This course is designed to prepare students to practice mediation in relationships, personal interaction, and as a mediator assisting in conflict resolution. Emphasis will be placed on transformative mediation. Course objectives will target three student groups: a.) All students will acquire the knowledge of what conflict resolution is, the history of mediation, various styles and strategies, and basic skills for mediation. b.) Students with career interest in mediation will acquire sufficient knowledge, skills, and experience to gain basic competency, enabling them to identify themselves as mediators, and to function as such when requested by parties to assist in conflict resolution. c.) Students seeking certification as transformative mediators will complete either eight co-mediation sessions or 12 hours of co-mediation experience. After completion of PO 224, required co-mediation experience involving both self- and outside-evaluation, and a review process, students will be certified by Whitworth University as Transformative Mediators. Jan Term.
PO 225 Politics, Media and Pop Culture3
Politics often occurs 'downstream' of culture in the United States; this course will examine the interplay between the two, giving special attention to contemporary forms of popular culture such as music, film, television, and literature. Jan Term.
PO 240 Comparative Politics4
Different governmental styles and political life of selected European, Asian and Latin-American governments. Comparisons of government structures, functions and outcomes. The course will examine democratic, authoritarian, patron-client and revolutionary systems.
PO 242 American Political Parties3
The role and functioning of parties in American politics and government. Interest groups, political action committees, campaigning and voting behavior are also examined.
PO 247 Contemporary Korea3
Interpretation of recent events in North and South Korea. South Korea's transition from dictatorship to democracy and its growth into an economic powerhouse 6 two successes that many developing countries would like to emulate. The North Korean nuclear threat and negotiations to end it. The fragile detente between North and South Korea, and the controversial U.S. role in Korea. Fulfills the Global Perspectives requirement.
PO 250 Environment and Society3
Studies the role of markets, governments, and civil society in shaping the way people behave toward the environment, focusing on the concept of sustainability in terms of society, economics and the environment. Because people interact in a variety of ways, the course moves from local to global and focuses on issues at each level. Also listed as EC 250.
PO 275 Poverty and Community Development3
Examines the changing tasks of cities and states in managing our societal future and the effectiveness of structures and policies. Highlights the politics of welfare and affirmative action.
PO 293 Great Decisions1
Participation in series of lectures and discussions on crucial foreign policy issues. Written responses to presentations. Spring semester.
PO 297 Nonviolent Defense and Conflict Resolution3
Major themes in the history and politics of nonviolence. Just War theory, nuclear pacifism, alternatives to military force, interpersonal conflict resolution. Ideas of Jesus, Tolstoy, Gandhi, Niebuhr, M.L. King, Jr., Gene Sharp.
PO 302 Legal Issues in Social & Behavioral Studies3
This course presents a brief historic overview of the American judicial system, and a comprehensive study of our contemporary legal processes and systems, with emphasis on issues and tensions between the legal system, societal norms, and individual interest.
PO 304W Political History of Beijing3
Provides historical understanding of the political and social history of China's capital city, Beijing. Listed in both political science and history.
PO 305W Cultural Odyssey of China3
Provides historical understanding of the cultural and religious history of China through its imperial and modern eras. Listed in both political science and history.
PO 307 Latin American Politics3
Explores the wide range of problems facing Latin-American societies based on their past underdevelopment. Takes a thematic approach, focusing on subjects as diverse as the military, peasants, Indians, U.S. foreign policy, multinational corporations, urbanization and education. Builds an understanding of Latin America using the resources of sociology. Prerequisite: SO 120. Fall semester.
PO 309 History of Vietnam War3
Also listed as PO 209.
PO 310 Research Methods in Political Science3
An introduction to the methods of research used by political scientists. Attention is given to survey research, polling, public opinion and data analysis. The course is highly recommended for students' interested graduate studies in social science, political science, policy studies, or foreign affairs. Prerequisites: PO 102 and PO 240.
PO 312 South Africa Program Preparation1
PO 314 Tanzania Program Preparation1
Preparation course for all students who will be part of the Semester in Tanzania program. Emphasis on the politics, history, economics, religion and culture of Tanzania.
PO 315 Understanding Global Issues3
This course provides an opportunity to learn about and reflect upon current issues in today's world. Issues covered will include the concept of human rights, war and peace, economic development, ethnicity, diversity, and environmental degradation. Continuing studies only.
PO 316 Ireland Preparation1
Preparation course for Peace and Conflict in Northern Ireland. Acceptance into PO 326 required.
PO 318 Globalization, Ecology, Gender in Central America4
Examination of the interconnected aspects of globalization, gender and ecology in Central America, in the light of the conceptions of biblical and social justice. Prerequisites: SO 307. Every third spring semester in Central America.
PO 320 American Political Process3
This course focuses on Western political theory and its intersection with public administration. Particular focus will be placed on issues related to social services. Required course for the social services major. Continuing studies only.
PO 326 Peace and Conflict in Ireland3
Explores of the historical, political, and religious roots of ""the Troubles"" in Northern Ireland as well as examines the prospects for peace in the region. Explores the ways in which this divided society copes with the attendant political, economic and social problems of religion, peace and conflict. Prerequisite: selection by instructor; sophomore standing. Periodic offering in Ireland.
PO 327 Contemporary Europe3
Periodic offering.
PO 331 The American Presidency3
Constitutional development of the office. Executive branch relations with Congress, the bureaucracy, the judiciary, the media and the public.
PO 332 Modern Congress3
Evolution of Congress and its relationship to modern society, the bureaucracy and the executive. Special focus on the process of (and participants in) policy making.
PO 334 Gender, Politics and Law3
Issues related to gender in American political history. Theoretical foundation of the women's movement; current political conflict related to gender in workplace, family, and society.
PO 336 Social-Political Philosophy3
An examination of the nature of justice and the extents of our social obligations. Considers both historical and contemporary sources, the latter including feminist and multicultural thinkers. Covers both theory and particular issues, like just war, economics and justice, rights to free expression, etc. Also listed as PH 336.
PO 340 Contemporary Africa3
Recent colonial and independence history of principal African countries. Traditional setting, cultural change, modern philosophies of political and economic development. Also listed as HI 340.
PO 341 Contemporary South Africa3
Analysis of the history, politics and religion of this strife-torn region of the African continent. Emphasis on the stress and conflicts between Africans, the British and the Afrikaners in the early years and on recent attempts to dismantle the apartheid system. Also listed as HI 341 and SO 341. Periodic Jan Term in South Africa.
PO 345 Development Strategies in Central America4
A service-learning and field development experience with agencies such as the Center for Christian Development, World Vision, Habitat for Humanity and other in Central America. Prerequisite: PO 307. Every third spring semester in Central America.
PO 346 Contemporary China and East Asia3
Interpretation of recent events in China, Japan, Taiwan, and Korea, through the cultural, historic, economic and institutional aspects of these societies.
PO 347 Globalization in Southeast Asia3
This course serves as a thematic overview of the political, social, cultural, and economic processes shaping Southeast Asia today. We investigate how Southeast Asia countries address and respond to the themes of democratization, liberalization and the environment.
PO 353 International Political Economy3
Progress of people in organizing beyond national borders; prospects for a world community based on world law. Advanced study in international relations.
PO 364W American Constitutional Law3
Examination of key Supreme Court decisions involving separation of powers, national regulation of the economy, church and state, civil rights and civil liberties. Prerequisite: PO 102.
PO 366 Modern Russia and the Soviet Union3
Also listed as HI 366. Periodic offering.
PO 371 Introduction to Public Administration3
An introduction to the key elements of public administration, set in a context that considers current political, economic, administrative, social and public service practice. Topics may include organization theory, management of human and fiscal resources, governance, and public policy. Included will be an examination of values and issues contemporary to local, state, and national constituencies. Periodic offering.
PO 396 Topics in Political Science1-3
Selected upper-division topics in political science. Periodic offering.
PO 421 Faith and Politics3
Politics is a window through which one explores the ways that biblical virtues such as justice, compassion, mercy, equity, humility and integrity offer viable alternatives to the cultural norms evident in our society. We will consider the role that Christianity can play in American public policy, focusing on the evangelical, Reformed, Catholic and Anabaptist traditions. Students will develop expertise in a policy area of their choice. Research intensive.
PO 423W Marxism and the Socialist World3
Focus on Marx's critique of capitalism. Later interpretations and application of Marx's theories in a variety of revolutions, from those of the Soviet Union, China, Yugoslavia and Cuba to current upheavals in the socialist world. Also listed as PH 423W. Periodic offering.
PO 425W International Development3
This course focuses on the challenges faced by poor countries located in the global south. It will include discussion of the political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence human development. We will practice applying major social science theories to specific, practical development problems. Attention will also be paid to the impact of globalization on the developing world. Regions discussed will include Latin America, Africa, Asia and eastern Europe.
PO 433W Western Political Thought3
Liberalism and pluralism--completing voices in Western political thought--are examined and critiqued.
PO 434W American Political Thought3
Principal ideas influencing American political institutions and policies. Rights, theories, the influence of faith and the development of our law are considered.
PO 445 Revolution in History3
Theory and history of revolution in Western Civilization. The Great Rebellion in England and revolutions in American, France, Russia, and China. Contemporary revolutionary movements in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Also listed as HI 445. Periodic offering.
PO 463 American Foreign Policy3
Major themes, debates, patterns and precedents of American foreign policy, emphasizing 20th-century diplomatic issues.
PO 465 International Law3
International law is a tough but interesting concept. Domestic law is positive law, which means that it is written down. Natural law is that which is written on our hearts. International law lives somewhere between the two. Part of it is written down; part of it is written on our hearts. You will make yourself crazy if you cannot allow yourself to live halfway between the concrete and the ephemeral for three months. We'll be looking at the law that binds nations. Sometimes nations are bound when they give their permission; sometimes they are bound in an absolute sense. But, there is no enforcement of this binding law. If there is no enforcement, why does it exist? Who obeys it? Who decides what it is? Is it real? These are the questions that connect all the units of the semester. Prerequisite: PO 364W.
PO 498W Senior Seminar3
In-depth research paper. Skills for graduate study and/or management positions in domestic and international affairs. Fall and spring semesters.
Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Chair

KATHRYN LEE

Professors

KATHRYN LEEJULIA STRONKS

Associate Professor

PATRICK VAN INWEGEN

Assistant Professor

MEGAN HERSHEY

Instructor

ANTHONY RODIN (VISITING)