Military Science/ROTC

Whitworth students may elect to participate in Army ROTC through a partnership program with Gonzaga University. Coursework requires travel to the Gonzaga campus, which is located six miles south of Whitworth.

Military Science/ROTCThe ROTC program is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army, Gonzaga University and Whitworth University. It provides training and qualification for leadership positions in the Regular Army, the U.S. Army Reserve, or the Army National Guard. A student may earn a commission as an Army second lieutenant while achieving a college degree in the academic discipline(s) of his or her choosing. Cadets incur no obligation during their first two years of ROTC and are not members of the U.S. Army (unless they are ROTC scholarship winners). Lower-division courses are open to all Whitworth students.

The objectives of the program are to prepare academically and physically qualified scholar/athlete/leaders for the challenge of serving as commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. To that end, the program stresses building leaders of character and competence to serve their country and community.

The program meets the country’s requirement for officer-leaders in the Army (active duty, National Guard, and reserves). It is, therefore, multifaceted, with distinctive sub-elements to meet individual needs and requirements. For example, ROTC is traditionally a four-year program, but individuals with prior service, members of reserve or National Guard units, participants of JROTC in high school and summer Leader's Training Course (LTC) participants may receive advanced placement credit and may complete the program in two years. All students typically enroll in one military science class, the leadership laboratory and the Military Physical Fitness course each semester. The program consists of two phases: the basic (lower-division) course, usually taken during the freshman and sophomore years or completed through advanced placement credit, and the advanced (upper-division) course.

Basic Course: First- and second-year courses, MI 101, 102, 201, and 202, designed for beginning students who want to qualify for entry into the advanced course and for students who may want to try military science without obligations. In addition to their academic requirements, basic-course cadets may participate in a variety of extracurricular activities. Placement credit for the basic course may be granted to students who have completed initial entry training for the armed forces, three years of Junior ROTC in high school or the ROTC leaders’ training course. MI 101 and 102 concentrate on fundamental skills, concepts, values and problem-solving and provide an overview of how the military fits into society. MI 201 and 202 more thoroughly address problem-solving, critical-thinking, communication and conflict-resolution skills.

Advanced Course: The advanced course consists of MI 301, 302, 401, and 402. It is open only to students who have completed the basic course or earned placement credit (see above). Students must also enroll in leadership labs (301L, 302L, 401L, or 402L) and Military Physical Fitness (303, 304, 403, or 404). Students also attend the four-week Cadet Summer Training during the summer between their junior and senior years. In addition to their academic requirements, advanced-course cadets provide student leadership for the Gonzaga Bulldog Battalion.

Completion of the basic course, advanced course and LDAC, coupled with a bachelor’s degree from the university, qualify the cadet for a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army.

Financial Assistance

Contracted students receive a subsistence allowance. Junior cadets receive $450 a month for up to 10 months, and senior cadets receive $500 a month for up to 10 months. Freshman and sophomore cadets receive $300 and $350 a month, respectively, for up to 10 months each year.

Scholarships

Freshman- and sophomore-level students may compete for Army ROTC campus-based scholarships. These scholarships are applied to tuition and fees plus an allowance for books. A student need not be enrolled in ROTC to be eligible to compete for two or three-year scholarships. No commitment is made until a scholarship is accepted, the student meets all administrative and physical criteria, and the oath for contracting is administered. High school seniors interested in applying for a four-year scholarship typically submit applications by Jan. 10 of their senior year.

Fees, Uniforms and ROTC Texts

A lab fee is the only fee associated with participation in the ROTC program. Uniforms and other equipment are furnished without charge. Students are responsible for, and must return, all government property issued to them.

Extracurricular Activities

Color Guard: The Gonzaga University Color Guard participates in a variety of school and civic functions where precision drill or presentation of the U.S. flag is appropriate.

Intramural Sports: The ROTC program sponsors teams that participate in flag football, volleyball, basketball, softball and other sports in Gonzaga and Whitworth universities' intramural leagues. The program sponsors special-event teams at both Gonzaga and Whitworth and sponsors cadet intramural teams as coordinated by Whitworth cadets with the professor of military science.

Special Qualification Training: Advanced-course and select basic-course cadets may participate in confidence-building courses such as Air Assault School, Airborne School, Northern Warfare Training Center, and Cadet Troop Leadership Training at locations around the world.

Military Science and Leadership Courses

Lower Division

MI 101 Foundations of Officership3
Develop self-confidence and review basic life skills of fitness and communication through team study and activities in basic skills, drill, physical fitness, rappelling, leadership reaction courses, team-building exercises, first aid, presentations and basic rifle marksmanship. Learn fundamental concepts of leadership, including organization and role of the Army, Army values, and expected ethical behavior in a profession in both classroom and outdoor laboratory environments. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MI 101L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 103). Participation in one-weekend off-campus exercise required.
MI 101L Leadership Lab1
Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science Course. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into the ROTC's advanced course in order to make an informed decision regarding whether to apply. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied through life. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 102L Leadership Lab1
See MI 101L.
MI 102 Introduction to Tactical Leadership3
Learn and apply principles of effective leading. Reinforce self-confidence though participation in physically and mentally challenging exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Develop communication skills (including active listening and feedback skills) and examine factors that influence leader and group effectiveness to improve individual performance and group interaction. Practice basic skills that underlie effective problem-solving. Examine the officer experience. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a leadership lab, MI 102L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 104). Participation in one weekend off-campus exercise required.
MI 103 Military Physical-Fitness1
Intensive military physical-fitness program designed to raise the level of individual physical fitness to its highest potential with emphasis on the development of an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in one's life. Participate in and learn to lead a physical fitness program. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 104 Military Physical-Fitness1
See MI 103.
MI 190 Directed Readings3
Incorporates readings in a variety of subject areas such as military history, leadership development, basic military skills, and related topics. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 191 Directed Readings3
See MI 190.
MI 201 Individual Leadership Studies3
Learn and apply ethics-based leadership skills including communication, feedback, and conflict resolution that develop individual abilities and contribute to the building of effective teams of people. Develop skills in problem-solving, critical thinking, oral presentations, writing concisely, planning of events, coordination of group efforts, advanced first aid, land navigation and basic military tactics. Learn fundamentals of ROTC's Leadership Development Program. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and leadership lab, MI 201L, plus participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 203), and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises.
MI 201L Leadership Lab1
See MI 101L.
MI 202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership3
Challenge current beliefs, knowledge, and skills. Prepare for the ROTC Advanced Course with an introduction to individual and team aspects of military tactics in small-unit operations. Includes use of radio communications, making safety assessments, movement techniques, planning for team safety/security, and methods of pre-execution checks. Practical exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Learn techniques for training others as an aspect of continued leadership development. Weekly requirements: three hours of class and a leadership lab, MI 201L, plus participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 204) and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises.
MI 202L Leadership Lab1
See MI 101L.
MI 203 Military Physical Fitness1
See MI 103.
MI 204 Military Physical Fitness1
See MI 103.
MI 290 Directed Readings3
Incorporates readings in a variety of subject areas such as leadership assessment, comparative military systems, basic military skills, and related topics. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 291 Directed Readings3
See MI 290.

Upper Division

MI 300 Ranger Challenge1
ROTC's "varsity sport," designed to familiarize students with the tactical and technical aspects of the professional soldier through hands-on training. Enhance leadership traits and build teamwork skills in an exciting and competitive atmosphere. The competition includes a 10k rucksack run in combat gear of forced march, building a one-rope bridge, a grenade assault course, rifle marksmanship, orienteering or military land navigation, a physical-fitness test, and weapons assembly. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 301 Adaptive Team Leadership3
A series of practical opportunities to lead small groups and receive personal assessments during execution of leadership development program in situations of increasing complexity. Analyze military missions and plan military operations using squad and small-unit battle drills and tactics and opportunities to plan and conduct training for lower-division students, both to develop skills and to function as vehicles for practicing leadership. Analyze the role officers played in the transition of the Army from Vietnam to the 21st century. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a required leadership lab (MI 301L) plus required participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness, MI 303, and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 301L Leadership Lab1
Open to students in the associated military science course only. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training activities with Basic-Course students and the ROTC program. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 302 Applied Team Leadership3
Develop cadet leadership competencies. Prepare for success at Cadet Summer Training: analyze tasks, prepare written or oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks, delegate and supervise tasks, and plan for and adapt to the unexpected while under stress. Examine importance of ethical decision-making in setting a positive climate that enhances team performance and accommodates subordinate spiritual needs. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MI 302L, plus participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 304) and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises. Prerequisite: MI 301. Corequisite: MI 302L, MI 304. Also listed as LS 302.
MI 302L Leadership Lab1
See MI 301L.
MI 303 Military Physical Fitness Program1
Open only to (and required of) students in MI 301, 302, 401, 402, of which this program is an integral part. Participate in, plan and lead physical-fitness programs. Develops the physical fitness required of an officer in the Army. Emphasis on the development of an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in one's life. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 304 Military Physical Fitness Program1
See MI 303.
MI 390 Directed Readings1-3
Incorporates readings in a variety of subject areas such as leadership dynamics in small units, offensive and defensive tactics, and studies in leadership characteristics and traits. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 391 Directed Readings3
See MI 390.
MI 395 Leadership Development & Assessment Course3
A five-week leadership practicum conducted at an active Army installation. Open only to (and required of) students who have completed MI 301, 302. The student receives pay. Travel, lodging, and most meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The advanced-camp environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small-unit level under varied, challenging conditions. Individual leadership and basic skills performance are evaluated during the camp. The leadership and skills evaluations at the camp weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the type of commission and job opportunities given to the student upon graduation from ROTC and the university.
MI 401 Adaptive Leadership3
Plan, conduct and evaluate activities of the ROTC cadet organization. Understand and execute staff organization, functions, and processes by articulating goals and putting plans into action to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve organization, including leader responsibilities and methods of counseling. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources, examine principles of subordinate motivation and organizational change. Apply leadership and problem-solving principles to a complex case study/situation. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a required leadership lab (MI 401L) plus participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 403), and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises. Corequisite: MI 401L, MI 403 Prerequisite: MI 302 and permission of the professor of military science.
MI 401L Leadership Lab1
See MI 301L.
MI 402 Adaptive Leadership3
Examine leadership responsibilities that foster an ethical command climate. Refine counseling and motivating techniques. Examine aspects of tradition, law, and legal aspects of decision-making and leadership. Prepare for a future as a successful Army lieutenant by performing platoon leader actions, analyzing the Army organization for operations from the tactical to strategic level, and assessing administrative and logistics management functions. Discuss reporting and PCS functions. Weekly requirements: three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MI 402L, plus participation in a minimum of three one-hour sessions for physical fitness (MI 404), and participation in two mandatory weekend exercises. Prerequisite: MI 401 and permission of the professor of military science.
MI 402L Leadership Lab1
See MI 301L.
MI 403 Military Physical Fitness Program1
See MI 303.
MI 404 Military Physical Fitness Program1
See MI 303.
MI 490 Directed Readings1-3
Incorporates readings in a variety of subject areas to prepare the cadet for becoming an officer. Prerequisite: permission of the professor of military science.
MI 491 Directed Readings3
See MI-490.
Battalion Commander

MAJ. TIMOTHY CULPEPPER

Recruiting Officer

COL. ALAN WESTFIELD

MS I Instructor

COL. DANIEL SHEAHANSFC SCOTT EVANS

MS II Instructor

COL. ALAN WESTFIELDMAJ. BERT ROY

MS III Instructor

MSG. RICHARD FLINTCPT. ELVIN FORTUNA

MS IV Instructor

MAJ. TIMOTHY CULPEPPER