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Mathematics & Computer Science

http://www.whitworth.edu/mcs

The Whitworth Mathematics & Computer Science Department offers a solid foundation in mathematics, statistics, computer programming, databases, networks and software engineering. Talented faculty in the department's interdisciplinary programs help students learn to apply mathematics and computing skills in the fields of natural science, business and industry, and the social and behavioral sciences.

Mathematics & Computer ScienceBelieving that God wants every individual to strive to reach his or her full potential, department faculty challenge motivated students by providing them the opportunity to participate in activities that go beyond the traditional classroom experience. These involve state-of-the-art research and development, service-learning projects and teaching assistant opportunities. Through theory, practice and the pursuit of knowledge, students develop the problem-solving skills that will help them succeed in their professions and in life. The learning outcomes of this major prepare the student to do the following:

Mathematics
  • Demonstrate an appropriate level of problem-solving skills using analytical reasoning.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication.
  • Develop necessary skills for ongoing learning.
  • Understand the need for solid ethical decision-making. Consider how faith and/or worldview can inform one’s vocation and professional practices.
  • Transition from concrete to abstract thinking according to the design of the undergraduate program in mathematics.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with various technological tools.
Computer Science
  • Demonstrate an appropriate theoretical foundation for computer science.
  • Develop software engineering proficiency.
  • Cultivate problem-solving and critical-thinking skills.
  • Reinforce interpersonal skills and effective teamwork.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in communication skills – written, verbal, and presentation.
  • Gain an international perspective and the ability to work cross-culturally.
  • Understand the need for sound ethical decision-making and the social and legal implications of those decisions. Consider how faith and/or worldview can inform one’s vocation and professional practices.

Computer Science Honors Program

The intent of the honors program is to provide motivated students with the social and academic activities necessary to foster their growth as individuals and their commitment to excellence and service to others. Students enrolled in the program must complete a major in computer science. To qualify for graduation as a Computer Science Honors Program graduate, candidates must successfully complete the following requirements by the end of their senior year. Each requirement will be documented in the student’s portfolio.

  1. Apply for admission into the honors program after completing CS 172.
  2. Maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above.
  3. Complete the professional learning requirement by fulfilling each of the following activities:
    • Join either the Association for Computing Machinery or the IEEE Computer Society.
    • Regularly attend ACM/IEEE Computer Society meetings.
    • Participate in the planning and presentation of a minimum of two ACM meetings.
    • Document meeting plans and presentations in the portfolio.
    • Participate in ACM/IEEE activities (i.e. social events, special-topics seminars, etc.).
  4. Complete the service requirement by participating in at least one of the following areas:
    • Teaching assistant for computer science courses
    • Research assistant for a computer science faculty member
    • Lab assistant for the general computing labs
    • Technician for the Whitworth Computing Services Department
    • Participation in related service-learning projects
  5. Complete the internship requirement by satisfactory completion of an internship and/or research assistantship.
  6. Complete and defend a senior research project.
  7. Complete one semester of CS 499W, Research Methods.

Requirements for a Mathematics Major, B.A. (42-43)

MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 273Calculus III4
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
MA 330Linear Algebra3
CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
Five of the following courses:15-16
Differential Equations
Introduction to Complex Variables
Numerical Analysis
Mathematical Statistics I
Mathematical Statistics II
Number Theory
Topics in Mathematics
Abstract Algebra I
Graph Theory and Combinatorics
Introduction to Real Analysis I
Introduction to Real Analysis II
Advanced Algorithm Design and Analysis
Research Methods
EN 356
  & EN 358
Mathematical Methods I
   and Mathematical Methods II
For teacher certification:
Modern Geometry
Mathematics in Secondary School


Requirements for a Mathematics Major, B.S. (55-57)

All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements.
MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 273Calculus III4
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
MA 281Differential Equations3
MA 294Career and Vocation Seminar1
MA 330Linear Algebra3
MA 430WGraph Theory and Combinatorics3
MA 440Introduction to Real Analysis I3
MA 441Introduction to Real Analysis II3
CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
Four of the following upper-division courses:12
Introduction to Complex Variables
Numerical Analysis
Mathematical Statistics I
Mathematical Statistics II
Number Theory
Topics in Mathematics
Abstract Algebra I
Research Methods
EN 356
  & EN 358
Mathematical Methods I
   and Mathematical Methods II
Two courses as follows:6-8
EC 210
  & EC 211
Principles of Microeconomics
   and Principles of Macroeconomics
PS 151
  & PS 153
General Physics I
   and General Physics II (and labs)
For teacher certification:
Modern Geometry
Mathematics in Secondary School


Requirements for a Mathematical Economics Major, B.A. (55)

MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 273Calculus III4
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
MA 281Differential Equations3
MA 294Career and Vocation Seminar1
MA 330Linear Algebra3
MA 357Mathematical Statistics I3
MA 358WMathematical Statistics II3
CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
EC 210Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
EC 320Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis3
EC 321Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis3
EC 402Econometrics3
Two of the following:6
(CS 273, CS 374W and MA 390/490 are strongly recommended for students pursuing actuarial certification)
History of Economic Thought
International Trade and Finance
Economic Development
Data Structures
Database Management
Numerical Analysis
Intro to Mathematical Biology
Internship
Internship

Computer Science Core Courses (27)

Required for all computer science majors (plus option requirements)
CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
CS 273Data Structures3
CS 274Ethical, Social & Legal Issues in Computer Science3
CS 278Computer Organization and Assembler Programming3
One of the following:3
Programming Languages
Windows Applications Development
Java Applications Development
CS 374WDatabase Management3
CS 472Software Engineering3
CS 475WOperating Systems3
Recommended:
Career and Vocation Seminar

 

Requirements for a Computer Science Major, B.A. (56)

International Project Management Option

Computer science core classes27
CS 376Technology Management3
BU 110Introduction to Business and Management3
BU 230Financial Accounting3
BU 311Principles of International Business3
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
SP 398Intercultural Communication3
Completion of an international study experience3
Technology & Culture: Study Abroad Program (or other prior approved international education experiences such as semester-abroad or year-abroad programs, international internship experience.)
A World Language & Cultures 201 course or demonstrated second-year language proficiency.4
One of the following:4
Pre-Calculus
Calculus for Social Sciences
Calculus I
Recommended:
Internet Applications Development
Networks
Managerial Accounting

 

Requirements for a Computer Science Major, B.A. (55)

Business Option

Computer science core classes27
CS 376Technology Management3
BU 110Introduction to Business and Management3
BU 230Financial Accounting3
BU 231Managerial Accounting3
BU 333Accounting Systems and Theory3
EC 210Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
One of the following:4
Pre-Calculus
Calculus for Social Sciences
Calculus I
Recommended:
Internet Applications Development
Networks

 

Requirements for a Computer Science Major, B.A. (55)

Network Systems Option

Computer science core classes27
CS 313Networks3
CS 314Microsoft Networks3
CS 315Distributed Scalable Computing3
CS 401Computer Architecture3
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
Three upper-division computer science courses9
One of the following:4
Pre-Calculus
Calculus for Social Sciences
Calculus I
Recommended:
Technology Management

Requirements for a Computer Science Major, B.S. (64-65)

Computer science core classes27
CS 401Computer Architecture3
CS 473Advanced Algorithm Design and Analysis3
MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
MA 330Linear Algebra3
PS 151General Physics I3
PS 151LGeneral Physics I Lab1
PS 153General Physics II3
PS 153LGeneral Physics II Lab1
One of the following:3-4
Digital Logic Design (Recommended for Computer Science majors)
Electronics
One of the following:3
Networks
Computer Graphics
Artificial Intelligence
One of the following:3
Numerical Analysis
Abstract Algebra I
Graph Theory and Combinatorics
Recommended:
Elementary Probability and Statistics
Calculus III
Distributed Scalable Computing
Research Methods

 

Requirements for a Bioinformatics Major, B.S. (68-69)

CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
CS 273Data Structures3
CS 355Introduction to Bioinformatics3
CS 374WDatabase Management3
CS 472Software Engineering3
CS 473Advanced Algorithm Design and Analysis3
MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
Math Elective3
Differential Equations
Graph Theory and Combinatorics
BI 140General Biology I: Genes, Cells and Evolution4
BI 141General Biology II: Organismal Biology4
BI 363Genetics4
Biology Elective3-4
Evolutionary Biology
Molecular Biology
Intro to Mathematical Biology
CH 161General Chemistry I3
CH 181General Chemistry II3
CH 271Organic Chemistry I3
CH 278Organic Chemistry II3
CH 401Biochemistry I3
Recommended Chemistry Courses
General Chemistry I Lab
General Chemistry II Lab
Organic Chemistry I Lab
Organic Chemistry II Lab
Biochemistry I Lab
Recommended Physics Courses
General Physics I
General Physics I Lab
General Physics II
General Physics II Lab

Requirements for a Mathematics Minor (21)

MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 273Calculus III4
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
MA 330Linear Algebra3
One of the following:3
Elementary Probability and Statistics
Differential Equations

Requirements for a Mathematics Minor (22)

(meets endorsement requirements)
This minor can be completed only by students receiving education certification.
All endorsements subject to change; see School of Education for updated requirements.
MA 171Calculus I4
MA 172Calculus II4
MA 256Elementary Probability and Statistics3
MA 278Discrete Mathematics3
MA 330Linear Algebra3
MA 365Modern Geometry3
One of the following:2
Mathematics: Elementary Methods
Mathematics in Secondary School

Note: Students pursuing elementary certification will also take MA 221.

 

Requirements for a Computer Science Minor (22)

CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
CS 273Data Structures3
CS 278Computer Organization and Assembler Programming3
CS 301Internet Applications Development3
CS 374WDatabase Management3
One of the following:4
Pre-Calculus
Calculus for Social Sciences
Calculus I

Requirements for an Information Technology Minor (21)

CS 171Computer Science I3
CS 172Computer Science II3
CS 313Networks3
CS 374WDatabase Management3
Three of the following:9
Internet Applications Development
Multimedia Applications Development
Microsoft Networks
Distributed Scalable Computing
Windows Applications Development
Java Applications Development

Computer Science Courses

CS 110 Introduction to Computer Information Systems3
Basic concepts of computer hardware, software and information processing. Impact of computers on society and the ethics of information technology. Hands-on experience with operating systems, file systems, word processors, spreadsheets, databases and communication tools. Fall semester.
CS 125 Business Information Systems3
Introduction to business application software. Students will cover business application software concepts including Microsoft Excel, Access and very introductory macro programming for these applications. The course will start with advanced Excel topics, proceed to Access and finish with introductory macro programming concepts. Students will implement and present a business-related project using either Excel or Access. Fall and spring semesters.
CS 171 Computer Science I3
Introduction to problem-solving, abstraction and design using the C++ language. Special emphasis on development of algorithms and writing programs in a structured form. Prerequisite: MA 108 or equivalent. Fall and spring semesters.
CS 172 Computer Science II3
Problem-solving, abstraction and design using the C++ language. Special emphasis on pointer variables, recursion, and file handling. Introduction to data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees), classes, and object-oriented programming. Prerequisite: CS 171. Fall and spring semesters.
CS 191 Independent Study1-4
CS 192 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
CS 196 Topics in Computer Science1-3
Selected lower-division topics in computer science. Periodic offering.
CS 273 Data Structures3
An introduction to stacks, queues, recursion, linked lists, trees, graphs, sorting, and searching. Emphasis on algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: CS 172. Fall and spring semesters.
CS 274 Ethical, Social & Legal Issues in Computer Science3
Students will research, discuss, and argue a variety of current ethical issues related to computer science. Students will also learn about the professional organizations' supporting computer scientists and understand each organization's code of ethics. Finally, students will understand how to be professionals in computer science. Prerequisite: CS 171. Spring semester.
CS 278 Computer Organization and Assembler Programming3
Computer organization and the structure of digital computers. Work in MASM assembler language programming on a PC computer. Prerequisite: CS 172. Fall semester.
CS 290 Internship1-4
CS 291 Independent Study1-4
CS 294 Career and Vocation Seminar1
Students in this course will learn about different career and vocational paths related to mathematics and computer science and go about pursuing a specific path. Further, students will explore how their own faith and worldview can interact with their discipline through vocation discussions. Spring semester.
CS 301 Internet Applications Development3
An information technology course designed as an introduction to the tools and methods of Internet applications development. Special emphasis on Internet programming languages and the design of interactive WWW documents. Prerequisite: CS 171. Jan Term, odd years.
CS 302 Multimedia Applications Development3
An information technology course designed as an introduction to the tools and methods of multimedia applications development. Students will learn how to integrate text, graphics, animation, digital video, and sound to create interactive multimedia applications. Recommended Prerequisite: CS 110, CS 171, CS 172, CS 273 or CS 125. Periodic Jan Term offering.
CS 313 Networks3
Fundamental concepts of computer network theory, topologies, architecture, and protocol layers. Provides a foundation in current networking technology for local area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet. Prerequisite: CS 273. Fall semester, odd years.
CS 314 Microsoft Networks3
A network-systems technology course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete day-to-day administrative tasks in a single domain or multiple domain Microsoft-based network. Students will learn how to install, configure, customize, optimize, troubleshoot, and support local- and wide-area network environments. Prerequisite: CS 172. Spring semester, even years.
CS 315 Distributed Scalable Computing3
Introduction to concepts of distributed and parallel processing paradigms. Project development using a variety of programming technologies. Development in Windows and Linux Operating Systems. Prerequisite: CS 273. Fall semester, even years.
CS 320 Quality Assurance in Software Development3
Students in this course will cover techniques in testing computer software. Topics will include: History of software and testing, ad-hoc testing methods, test plans, formal testing methods, automation and testing tools, and security testing. Students will have a firm foundation in testing as well as improved skills as software developers. Prerequisite: CS 172. Fall semester, even years.
CS 355 Introduction to Bioinformatics3
This is an interdisciplinary course that integrates molecular biology, biophysics, statistics and computer science. The course provides an introduction to the computational tools, techniques and algorithms that are used by biologists, geneticists and computational chemists to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes that govern biological organisms. Spring semester, odd years.
CS 357 Computer Graphics3
Hands-on experience with state-of-the-art computer graphics rendering and display techniques. Emphasis on texture mapping, ray tracing, and 2-D and 3-D object manipulation and animation. Prerequisite: CS 273. MA 330 highly recommended. Spring semester, odd years.
CS 359 Introduction to Technology & Culture: Study Abroad Program Preparation1
Required for those students taking part in CS 360: Technology & Culture: Study Abroad Program in Jan Term. In addition to preparing students to experience a foreign culture, this course studies technology from global, economic, religious, gender and intercultural viewpoints. The course serves to build community among the program participants and prepares them for international travel, intercultural sensitivity, and cross-cultural experiences. Taken in preparation for CS 360. Permission of instructor. Fall term, odd years.
CS 360 Technology & Culture: Study Abroad Program3
A Jan Term study program focusing on the interactions between technology and culture. Students will broaden their cross-cultural understanding by exploring the role of technology in another culture as well as the influence the culture has had on technology. Students will participate in university exchanges, visit vital industries, travel to important historical cultural sites, attend different churches, and engage in other rich cross-cultural experiences such as service projects. Students are required to prepare for this program by taking CS 359 Introduction to Technology & Culture. Destination country varies, e.g. Ireland/Britain, India, etc. Jan Term, even years. Prerequisite: CS 172.
CS 370 Programming Languages3
Concepts and paradigms of programming languages. Topics include: history of programming languages, language-design principles, syntax, semantics, data types, control structures, object-oriented languages, functional programming, logical programming, and parallel programming. Includes laboratory experience in comparing paradigms and behaviors of different languages. Prerequisite: CS 273. Fall semester, odd years.
CS 371 Windows Applications Development3
A foundation for developing conventional Windows applications using object-oriented and component-based programming techniques. Topics include component-based development, network applications, graphical user interface components, exception handling, and components for web applications. Prerequisite: CS 273. Jan Term, even years.
CS 372 Java Applications Development3
A foundation for developing conventional applications in the object-oriented Java programming language. Topics include Java programming constructs, multithreading, graphical user interface components, exception handling, and Java networking. Prerequisite: CS 172. Jan Term, odd years.
CS 373 Digital Logic Design3
Combinatorial and sequential logic circuit design and analysis. Hands-on experience with modern design tools, hardware description languages (e.g. VHDL), and FPGA devices. Topics include number systems, minimization, multiplexers, decoders, encoders, code converters, comparators parity, circuits, and shifters. Prerequisites: MA 278 and PS 153. Fall semester, odd years.
CS 374W Database Management3
Comprehensive introduction to design and development of databases and database applications. Combined approach of relational database theory and application development using popular database management systems. May also include current trends such as XML databases, data warehousing, and web interfaces. Prerequisite: CS 273. Fall semester.
CS 376 Technology Management3
The course examines theory and practice in management of information technology and software projects in internationally competitive organizations. Study includes leadership of cross-functional personnel and international teams, innovative strategies in technical cultures, analysis of organizational structures, project marketing, quality assurance, and general project management. Prerequisites: CS 125 or CS 171, and must take BU 110. Fall semester, even years.
CS 380 Field Studies1-4
CS 390 Internship1-4
CS 391 Independent Study1-4
CS 392 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
CS 395 Teaching Assistantship1-4
CS 396 Topics in Computer Science1-3
Selected upper-division topics in computer science. Periodic offering.
CS 401 Computer Architecture3
Digital computer system design and analysis. Topics include: synchronous/asynchronous sequential machines, parallel structures, pipelining, and input/output. Includes laboratory experience in microprocessor design and architecture. Prerequisite: CS 278. Spring semester, even years.
CS 457 Artificial Intelligence3
Introduction to artificial intelligence concepts. Foundational theory includes intelligent agents, search, first-order logic, knowledge representation, planning, probabilistic reasoning, and genetic programming. Projects and programming of robotics as autonomous agents. Prerequisite: CS 273. Spring semester, even years.
CS 472 Software Engineering3
Designed as an intensive, project-oriented, senior capstone course. Topics include software system analysis and design, software project management and life cycle, software tools, documentation, and maintenance. Prerequisites: CS 273 and CS 374W. Senior class standing. Spring semester.
CS 473 Advanced Algorithm Design and Analysis3
Advanced study of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include advanced complexity analysis, advanced recursive algorithms, graph theory algorithms, optimization problems, algorithms related to number theory, and other contemporary topics. Analysis of problems associated with searching and sorting. Prerequisites: CS 273 and MA 278. Fall semester.
CS 475W Operating Systems3
Introduction to the theory of basic operating systems. Includes memory management, scheduling, resource management, synchronization, process and thread management, security, and concurrent processes. Prerequisites: CS 273 and CS 278. Spring semester.
CS 490 Internship1-4
CS 491 Independent Study1-4
CS 495 Teaching Assistantship1-4
CS 496 Research Assistantship1-3
Opportunity to work closely with a professor on a research project. Periodic offering. Prerequisite: CS 273.
CS 499W Research Methods3
Examination of research methods and a foundation for the Computer Science research program. An opportunity to challenge the advanced and motivated student. Includes readings, dissemination methods research projects in current topics, and working closely with faculty in a mentoring relationship. Prerequisite: CS 172 or instructor permission. Fall semester.

Mathematics Courses

MA 107 Basic Concepts in Modern Mathematics3
Mathematics for the liberal arts student. An introduction to contemporary mathematics and its role in society. Current and past applications of mathematics in the real world will be examined. Topics may include management science, coding information, geometric applications, and statistics. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 108 Finite Mathematics for Social Sciences4
A study of mathematical applications to business, economics, social sciences, and personal finance. Topics include mathematics of finance, systems of linear equations, matrices and linear programming. Prerequisite: MA 107 or 500+ SAT. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 150 Pre-Calculus4
Preparation for the calculus sequence. Solving systems of equations, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, and equations with applications in the social and natural sciences. Prerequisite: MA 107 or 500+ SAT. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 158 Calculus for Social Sciences4
Limits, rates of change, differentiation, graphing and optimization, integration, and business applications. Prerequisites: MA 108 or the equivalent of 550 or above on the SAT. Fall and spring semesters.
MA 171 Calculus I4
Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, and anti-differentiation. Emphasis on solving problems numerically and graphically, as well as algebraically. Prerequisite: MA 150 or 600+ SAT. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 172 Calculus II4
Applications of integration, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, and infinite series. Prerequisite: MA 171. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 191 Independent Study1-4
MA 192 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
MA 220 Structure in Elementary Mathematics3
This course is designed for the prospective elementary or middle school teacher. It focuses on development of number systems, vocabulary, and symbolism in the present-day use of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and statistics. It applies toward the general-education math requirement for elementary-education majors only.
MA 221 Math for Elementary School Teachers I3
For the prospective elementary teacher, includes an introduction to problem solving, set operations and their application to arithmetic, numeration systems, arithmetic, algebra, and number theory as related to elementary school mathematics curriculum. Does not apply toward the math general education requirement except for candidates for elementary teaching certificates. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 222 Math for Elementary School Teachers II3
Course designed for future elementary school teachers. Covers topics of probability, descriptive statistics, geometry, measurement, and motion geometry. Does not apply toward the math general education requirement except for candidates for elementary teaching certificates. Prerequisite: MA 221. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 256 Elementary Probability and Statistics3
Descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, and regression. Fall and spring semesters, and Jan Term. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 273 Calculus III4
Multivariable calculus, including partial differentiation, vector analysis, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MA 172. Fall and spring semesters. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 278 Discrete Mathematics3
A study of the foundations of mathematics (including sets, logic, relations, and functions), algorithms, combinatorics, and graph theory. Focus will be on developing logic and problem-solving skills involved in higher mathematics. Prerequisite: MA 171. Fall and spring semesters.
MA 281 Differential Equations3
A study of ordinary differential equations and their use in mathematical models in the physical, biological and social sciences, and in economics. Covers analytic and numerical solution techniques. Prerequisite: MA 273. Fall and spring semesters.
MA 290 Internship1-4
MA 291 Independent Study1-4
MA 294 Career and Vocation Seminar1
Students in this course will learn about different career and vocational paths related to mathematics and computer science and go about pursuing a specific path. Further, students will explore how their own faith and worldview can interact with their discipline through vocation discussions. Spring semester.
MA 317 Introduction to Complex Variables3
Introduction to complex numbers, analytic and elementary functions, and integration, series, residues and poles, and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MA 273. MA 278 can also be taken as co-requisite. Spring semester, odd years.
MA 328 Math History Study Abroad Prep1
Required preparatory course for students planning on participating in the Jan term Math History Study Abroad Program. Includes background reading in the history of mathematics, information on specific sites visited while abroad, research for presentation to be given on site in Europe. Prerequisite: MA-172.
MA 329 Math History3
Study of the historical and cultural contexts of mathematics through readings, film and site visits in Europe. Prerequisite: MA-171, 172 & 328.
MA 330 Linear Algebra3
Vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, Euclidean spaces, systems of equations, and eigenvalues. Prerequisite: MA 172. MA 278 strongly recommended. Fall and spring semesters.
MA 350 Numerical Analysis3
Elementary discussion of errors, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, linear systems of equations, solutions of non-linear equations. Numerical differentiation, integration, solutions to differential equations. Prerequisites: MA 273, MA 330, and CS 172. MA 278 strongly recommended. Spring semester, even years.
MA 352 Intro to Mathematical Biology3
This course covers the following areas of biology: population growth, neuroscience, epidemiology, predator-prey models, cardiac dynamics and selected special topics. Mathematical topics will include: discrete and continuous differential equations, nonlinear analysis, bifurcation theory. Jan term, odd years. Prerequisite: MA 281.
MA 357 Mathematical Statistics I3
A theoretical study of probability, random variables and their distributions, confidence intervals, and tests of hypothesis, and regression and correlation. Prerequisites: MA 256 & MA 273. TI 83 or 84 calculator required. Fall semester, odd years.
MA 358W Mathematical Statistics II3
A theoretical study of confidence intervals and estimators, test of hypothesis, ANOVA, regression and correlation, and non-parametric methods. Prerequisite: MA 357. Spring semester, even years. TI 83 or 84 calculator required.
MA 360 Number Theory3
Divisibility, congruence, prime numbers, Diophantine equations, quadratic reciprocity, and number theoretic functions. Emphasis on mathematics education and problem-solving. Prerequisites: MA 172 and MA 278. Fall semester, even years.
MA 365 Modern Geometry3
Sets and propositions, postulation systems, affine geometry, Euclidean, and non-Euclidean geometry. Required for high school mathematics teachers. Prerequisites: MA 171 and MA 278. Spring semester.
MA 380 Field Studies1-4
MA 390 Internship1-4
MA 391 Independent Study1-4
MA 392 Foreign Study/Exchange1-17
MA 395 Teaching Assistantship1-4
MA 396 Topics in Mathematics1-3
Mathematical topics of current interest to the mathematics faculty and advanced students. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Periodic offering.
MA 410 Abstract Algebra I3
Logic, sets, relations, functions, groups, rings, fields, and vector spaces. Mathematics education and computing applications studied. Prerequisites: MA 172 and MA 278. Fall semester, odd years.
MA 411 Abstract Algebra II3
Rings, integral domains, homomorphisms, and fields. Emphasis on theory and proof. Prerequisite: MA 410. Periodic offering.
MA 430W Graph Theory and Combinatorics3
Study of paths and circuits, trees, planarity and duality, coloring of graphs, digraphs and networks, permutations and combinations, multinomial theorem, generating functions, principle of inclusion and exclusion, and recurrence relations. Prerequisites: MA 172 and MA 278. Spring semester.
MA 440 Introduction to Real Analysis I3
Sets and functions, properties of the real numbers, completeness axiom, elements of point-set topology, and sequences. Prerequisites: MA 273 and MA 278. Fall semester, even years.
MA 441 Introduction to Real Analysis II3
Limits of functions, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and infinite series of numbers and functions. Prerequisite: MA 440. Spring semester, odd years.
MA 490 Internship1-4
MA 491 Independent Study1-4
MA 495 Teaching Assistantship1-4
MA 496 Research Assistant1-3
Opportunity to work closely with a professor on a research project. Periodic offering.
MA 499W Research Methods3
Examination of research methods and a foundation for the Computer Science research program. An opportunity to challenge the advanced and motivated student. Includes readings, dissemination methods research projects in current topics, and working closely with faculty in a mentoring relationship. Prerequisite: CS 172 or instructor permission. Fall semester.
Dean of Arts and Sciences

NOELLE WIERSMA

Chair

PETER TUCKER

Professors

LYLE COCHRANKENT JONES

Associate professors

MARTHA GADYSUSAN MABRYDONNA PIERCEPETER TUCKER

Assistant professors

RICHARD BISHOPNATHAN MOYERMICHAEL REMPEED WALKER

Instructor

ANNE TREFRY