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Graduate Studies in Education

http://www.whitworth.edu/gse

SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT (0-12)
Completion of the prerequisite courses and the M.A.T. required special education courses and field experiences will prepare a candidate for an endorsement in Special Education (P-12). Please see the special education coordinator for advising.

EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT (P-3)
Completion of the endorsement in special education, combined with two additional courses – EDS 534 Early Speech, Language and Literacy and EDS 538 Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Method  (or equivalent coursework) – and an advanced practicum in an early intervention or preschool special education setting will prepare a candidate for an endorsement in early childhood special education (P-3). Please see the special education coordinator for advising.

DEAF EDUCATION SPECIALTY ENDORSEMENT (P-12)
Completion of the endorsement in special education combined with a set of required courses from Spokane Falls Community College’s Interpreters Program (or equivalent coursework), EDS 534 Early Speech, Language and Literacy, and an advanced practicum in a deaf education setting will prepare a candidate for a specialty endorsement in deaf education (P-12). Please see the special education coordinator for a transcript evaluation and advising.

GIFTED EDUCATION SPECIALTY ENDORSEMENT
The gifted education specialty endorsement can be obtained while earning the master of arts in teaching degree, emphasis in gifted and talented (M.A.T./GT). It can also be earned separately in an 11-credit program, including a field study and a culminating portfolio. Please contact the Whitworth Center for Gifted Education in the Graduate Studies in Education Department for advising.

Certification
  • While every attempt is made to ensure that certification programs are compatible with degree study, certification requirements may go beyond degree requirements.
  • Whitworth University programs lead to Washington certification. For certification in another state, the applicant will need to contact the office of the superintendent of public instruction in that state to secure the certification requirements.
  • Whitworth University certification programs must meet requirements instituted by the Washington Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Professional Education Standards Board. Therefore, certification requirements are subject to change upon notification by the OSPI and PESB and must be incorporated into all appropriate certification plans.
  • Certification study without the pursuit of a degree is possible where appropriate.
  • Only candidates in good standing will be certified. Contact the Whitworth Office of Graduate Studies in Education at 509.777.3228 for further details.

The Whitworth Educational Certification and Career Services Office is located in Dixon Hall. For assistance with any of the following items, please call 509.777.4405 or 509.777.4406.

Services Provided by Educational Certification and Career Services
  • Administrative certification: principal-endorsed
  • Educational staff associate certification: school counselor-endorsed
  • Continuing teacher certification
  • Placement files: creating, updating, and mailing
  • Career service information:
    • Career fairs
    • Résumés and cover letters
    • Current job listings
    • On-campus visits
Advising

Call the Whitworth Office of Graduate Studies in Education, 509.777.3228, for an appointment to discuss the various programs. An advisor will be assigned to assist you.

Admission Policies

  1. No more than six semester credits should be taken prior to admission to GSE, as there is no guarantee they will count toward a graduate degree.
  2. Complete an application packet by the following dates: for fall semester, July 1; for spring semester, Nov. 1; for summer semester, April 1.
  3. There are two levels of admission, as follows:
    • Full admission: cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or higher, satisfaction of all prerequisites and acceptable recommendations.
    • Restricted admission: cumulative grade-point average of 2.7 or higher, acceptable recommendations, and conditions identified by the admissions committee.
  4. Applicants are expected to earn a score at the 25th percentile or higher on the verbal, quantitative, and analogies portions of the Graduate Record Exam or the Miller Analogy Test or to provide documented evidence of their ability to succeed in graduate school. This would include a statistics course and demonstrated graduate-level writing ability.
  5. Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  6. Completion/concurrent enrollment in a teacher-education program is required for all School of Education master’s degree and certification programs except for MIT, M.A./M.Ed. school counseling, M.A. in marriage and family therapy; and M.Ed. in administrative leadership. Photocopies of all Washington teacher, administrator and/or ESA certificates, as well as certificates from other states, must be submitted with the application for admission.
  7. Prerequisites prior to graduate study may be required where applicants lack appropriate preparation. Students whose first language is not English may be required to complete prerequisites prior to consideration for admission to GSE. These courses are determined with an advisor to improve expertise in English, math, education methods and study skills.
  8. Part of the application process to GSE is completion of the character-and-fitness supplement. Based upon a review and documentation of items disclosed in the character-and-fitness supplement, Whitworth may deny admission to any individual applying to GSE. Applicants with suspended or revoked educational certificates (teacher, counselor, principal, psychologist or other) for a program leading to state certification will not be processed for admission to GSE until such certificates have been reinstated. This includes certificates from other states, as well as from Washington.
  9. For international students, the TOEFL test or the GRE is required prior to admission. The minimum score accepted on the TOEFL is 79 iBT or 550 on the paper test. Testing is also done in English and in math, prior to the student’s graduate coursework, to determine any necessary prerequisites that need to be written into the degree plan. International students must provide proof of adequate financial resources for graduate study prior to admission.
  10. Special education, marriage & family therapy, and school counseling applicants will be interviewed.

Note: At any given time, one or more of our programs may be undergoing revision to stay current with changing Washington State Board of Education requirements. Please consult your advisor to ensure that you have the most current information on your program.

Academic Policies for Graduate Education Programs

Academic Standards
  1. Whitworth GSE offers independent studies (EDA/EDU/EDC/EDG/EDS-591) that may be taken on a tutorial basis. GSE approval is based upon the following criteria: No regular course covers the project materials, and a designated faculty member agrees to supervise the study (with a limit of two such studies during a student's entire program). Students are to submit proposals with the signatures of the faculty supervisor and the director/department chair to the GSE office by registration of the term in which the study will be taken.
Admission and Expulsion
  1. Students who take no courses toward the completion of their master’s degree within a one-year period will be placed on inactive status. Should inactive students return to active status, they may be responsible for any new university or program requirements.
  2. Students may be suspended or expelled for failure to meet academic standards and for plagiarism, cheating, misrepresentation of background information, or violation of program requirements. Subsequent readmission follows the procedures for new admission under the catalog requirements in effect at the time of reapplication.
  3. Whitworth reserves the right to withhold transcripts and diplomas until all campus debts are settled.
  4. Students are prohibited from bringing children, other family members or guests to their classes except in an emergency and with the permission of the instructor.
General Guidelines
  1. Whitworth Graduate Studies in Education students may register online or in the GSE office in Dixon Hall. Tuition is paid through student accounting services in McEachran Hall. If a student enrolls in a course that is not approved for a specific program, that class will be considered an enrichment course only; it will not count toward a graduate degree or certification program.
  2. Check with your advisor each term for pre-registration advising and for exit requirements.
  3. Online registration is available, with advisor clearance, after a student’s first term.

Master of Arts in Teaching

Master of Arts in Teaching, Gifted and Talented (M.A.T.)

Kathryn Picanco (program director)

This program is designed to train teachers of gifted and talented students and mainstream classroom teachers to evaluate and utilize appropriate current trends and research ideas, develop differentiated curriculum for all students, and individualize instruction to meet the needs of each child.  All required gifted and talented courses are offered online.

The Washington state gifted education specialty endorsement is available at Whitworth University. Contact the director of the Center for Gifted Education for a transcript evaluation and advising.

M.A.T. Gifted and Talented (34)

Prerequisites:
Statistics
Required core courses:
EDU 501Advanced Educational Psychology3
EDU 502Curriculum Development3
EDU 515Educational Research4
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
Required gifted and talented courses:
EDG 551Nature and Needs of the Gifted Learner3
EDG 552Teaching for Independence and Responsibility2-3
or EDG 571 Teaching the Underachiever
EDG 553Creativity and Analytical Thinking3
EDG 554Strategies and Instructional Models for Challenging Bright Students3
Complete one of the following:3
Practicum/Field Study: Gifted and Talented
Graduate Research Project
Approved electives:
Six to seven semester credits of approved Whitworth gifted and talented classes and professional development classes. Other electives must be approved by the academic advisor.6-7
Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement

The gifted education specialty endorsement can be obtained while earning the Master of Arts in Teaching, Emphasis in Gifted and Talented (M.A.T./GT). It can also be earned separately in an 11-credit program, including a field study and a culminating portfolio. Please contact the Center for Gifted Education in the Graduate Studies in Education department for advising.

A variety of graduate-level short courses on topics of interest in gifted education, professional development, and general education are offered. Both on campus and on-line offerings are available. Descriptions are available through the Center for Gifted Education & Professional Development.

Master of Arts in Teaching Special Education (M.A.T.)

Flint Simonsen (program coordinator)

This program is designed to extend the skills and knowledge of teachers who wish to work with exceptional children and youth. It emphasizes curriculum needs of pupils rather than disability categories. The program can accommodate teachers who are seeking to complete their endorsement in special education under the new Washington state requirements. It is also intended to provide graduate-level specialized training for teachers who are already endorsed in special education. The program prepares teachers to understand inclusion (working with exceptional children in the regular classroom), as well as to work with special-needs learners in resource rooms or self-contained settings.

Prerequisite competencies are required. Transfer classes (graduate or undergraduate) may be accepted in place of the following courses, but any substitutions must be individually evaluated. The following courses, with the exception of field experiences, may be taken at Whitworth as part of the graduate electives required:

Possible Special Education Electives:

EDS 520Exceptional Learners & Inclusion3
EDS 521Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
EDS 522Assessment and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Planning3
EDS 523Intervention for Academic Learning Problems3

M.A.T. in Special Education (37)

Prerequisites:
Statistics
Required core courses:
EDU 501Advanced Educational Psychology3
EDU 502Curriculum Development3
EDU 515Educational Research4
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
Required special education courses:
EDS 524Early Intervention for Special Education3
EDS 526Intervention for Severe Communication, Sensory and Physical Problems3
EDS 530Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder3
EDS 536Intervention through Positive Behavior Support3
Required field experience (at alternate level to prerequisite experience):
(Take either EDS 581 plus EDS 583 or EDS 582 plus EDS 584)5
Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-8
   and Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-8
Practicum: Special Education, Middle/High School
   and Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Middle/High School
Complete six credits from the following:6
Early Speech, Language and Literacy
Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Method
Nature and Needs of the Gifted Learner
Introduction to Sign Language and the Deaf
Diagnosis and Treatment of Reading Diff. Disabilities
Complete the following exit requirement:0
EDS 595Exit Project1

Note: Special education endorsement is also possible without completion of the master’s degree. Students must pass the WEST-E to receive an endorsement. Check with the special education coordinator for information.

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy (64)

Prerequisites:
Abnormal Psychology
Statistics
EDC 502Development Across the Life Span3
EDC 503Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling3
EDC 504Counseling Theories3
EDC 509Research for Counselors3
EDC 510Therapy for Children and Families2
EDC 511The Counseling Process3
EDC 512
  & 512L
Introduction to Group Counseling
   and Lab: Intro Group Counseling
3
EDC 514Therapy for Adolescent and Families 2
EDC 532Psychopathology & Assessment3
EDC 533Legal and Ethical Considerations in Counseling1
EDC 535Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
EDC 553Intro to Marriage and Family2
EDC 556Research Evaluation & Writing2
EDC 557Family Systems3
EDC 558Theories of Family Therapy3
EDC 559Theories of Couple and Marriage Therapy3
EDC 560Psychopharmacology2
EDC 561Advanced Systems Theory: Critical Issues in Mft3
EDC 562Ethics in Human Sexuality2
EDC 563Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy3
Advisory Board Interview
Washington State Background Check
EDC 582Community-Agency Counseling Practicum5
Complete two internships, four credits each:8
Counseling Internship I: Community Agency
Counseling Internship II: Community Agency
EDC 597Exit Exam0
Optional: Thesis (6 credits)
Graduate Thesis
Graduate Thesis
Chemical dependency certification is available with this program; see advisor.

Master of Education

Alison Olzendam (director)

M.Ed. in Educational Administration (36)

Prerequisite:
Statistics
Core courses:
EDU 501Advanced Educational Psychology3
EDU 515Educational Research4
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
Required administration courses:
EDA 520Legal & Policy Foundations2
EDA 521Public School Finance2
EDA 540Effective Leadership and Organization4
EDA 541Instructional Leadership for School Improvement4
EDA 542Building Community4
EDA 543Visionary and Moral Leadership4
Completion of the following:
EDA 581Internship I: Administration, P-123
EDA 582Internship II: Administration, P-123
Internships cannot begin until recommendation by the Professional Education Advisory Board.
Note: All internships begin in the fall of the school year. The internship competencies will be based on the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards. A notebook that details required competencies is provided. The internship includes 540 hours and the opening and closing of the school for the year. It also includes an observation at an alternate level from the primary internship placement.

Certification: School Administration (26)

Residency Administrator Certificate (P-12 Principal)
Required administration courses:
EDA 540Effective Leadership and Organization4
EDA 541Instructional Leadership for School Improvement4
EDA 542Building Community4
EDA 543Visionary and Moral Leadership4
EDA 520Legal & Policy Foundations2
EDA 521Public School Finance2
Completion of the following:
EDA 581Internship I: Administration, P-123
EDA 582Internship II: Administration, P-123
Observation at alternate level will be included during internships.

This program is for potential principals/program directors in public or private (P-12) schools. Each candidate must have appropriate evaluations/references on file in the GSE office before admission is approved and must schedule a conference with the coordinator of the educational administrative program. The program carries with it competency-based certification with recommendations from the Administrative Professional Education Advisory Board. This board is composed of representatives of the Association of Washington School Principals, Washington Association of School Administrators, Washington Education Association and Whitworth University.

Experience Requirement: Candidates must hold or have held a valid teacher’s certificate or a valid educational staff associate certificate, and must have demonstrated successful school-based experience in an instructional role with students, for a minimum of three years.

Certification at the Residency Level: Generally achieved together with the completion of the M.Ed. degree in administration. Certification is available for P-12 administration. The certification program is also available for teachers or counselors who have already completed a master’s-degree program.

Professional Administrator’s Certificate: Requires verification of 540 days of service as a principal, vice principal or assistant principal with satisfactory district evaluations. This requirement is subject to change by the superintendent of public instruction.

Note: A course that covers abuse and neglect of children is required for the professional teacher certificate and professional administrator’s certificate. Check with the certification office at 509.777.4406.

M.Ed. in Administrative Leadership (36)

Roberta Wilburn, (program coordinator)

This program is for potential administrators in settings not requiring principalship certification.  (Examples: educational service districts, private schools, special education settings and community colleges and other higher education settings.)

M.Ed. in Administrative Leadership (36)

Prerequisite:
Statistics
WUCAT
Required core courses:
EDA 511Orientation to Leadership1
EDA 512Visionary and Moral Leadership3
EDA 515Organizational Management2
EDA 516Building Community3
EDA 517Moral Leadership in a Democratic Society3
Required Administration Courses:
EDA 501Organizational Behavior and Leadership3
EDA 506Business and Organizational Ethics2
EDA 518Intercultural Business Communications.2
EDA 531Administrative and Instructional Practices in Higher Education3
EDU 515Educational Research4
EDU 5.. Elective, minimum of 4 semester credits4
Completion of the following:
EDA 588Internship I: Administrative Leadership3
EDA 589Internship II:Administrative Leadership3
Successful completion of the following:
EDU 597Exit Exam/Project0

The courses in the Administrative Leadership program are subject to change due to program updates. Please check with your advisor for current course offerings.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

M.Ed., Elementary or Secondary Education (34)

Prerequisites:
Statistics
WUCAT
Required core courses:
EDU 501Advanced Educational Psychology3
EDU 502Curriculum Development3
EDU 515Educational Research4
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
Electives:
Electives chosen with the assistance of the academic advisor to meet individual professional goals at either the elementary or secondary level may be taken from EDU, EDA, EDG, EDS, EDE and some EDC courses may include up to six semester credits of approved graduate-level Whitworth short courses. Secondary candidates may take up to six semester credits in-400-level courses in their content area18
The completion of one of the following:3
Graduate Research Project (3)
Thesis
   and Thesis (6)
(Take three semester credits fewer in elective courses if EDU 598A and B is completed.)
Successful completion of the following:
Exit Exam/Project

Note: A technology component will be added to these programs as soon as appropriate approval is in place.

The courses in the Elementary and Secondary education programs are subject to change due to program updates.  Please check with your advisor for current course offerings.

Endorsements

Graduate-level English language learners (ELL), reading, special education endorsement, and specialty endorsements in teaching the gifted courses may be applied toward the 18 elective courses required in the M.Ed. in elementary education or M.Ed. in secondary education. Consult your academic advisor for additional information.

Evening Teacher Certification Program

Evening Teacher Certification Program courses taken at the graduate level may be applied to the M.Ed. in elementary education or the M.Ed. in secondary education. Consult academic advisor for additional information.

Master of Arts School Counseling (M.A.)

Master of Education School Counseling (M.Ed.)

Roberta Wilburn, (program coordinator)

This program is designed for the preparation of residency ESA certification for school counselors at both the elementary and secondary school levels.  Students living beyond 50 miles of Spokane will be responsible for paying mileage fee for supervision.

M.A. School Counseling (59)

*Additional hours required for Thesis

M.Ed. School Counseling (53)

Prerequisites:
Statistics
Orientation to Schools
Exceptional Learners and Inclusion (for non-teachers)
Required Courses:
EDC 501Orientation to Professional Counseling3
EDC 502Development Across the Life Span3
EDC 503Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling (Prerequisite before taking EDC 506)3
EDC 504Counseling Theories3
EDC 505Career Development and Counseling3
EDC 506Consultation in the Helping Professions3
EDC 507Measurement and Evaluation2
EDC 509Research for Counselors3
EDC 511The Counseling Process3
EDC 512Introduction to Group Counseling (to be taken concurrently with EDC 512L; prerequisite: full admission)3
EDC 521Psychoeducational Assessment2
EDC 535Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
EDC 522Role and Function of the School Counselor (to be taken concurrently with EDC 583)3
EDC 523Legal and Ethical Considerations in School Counseling (to be taken concurrently with EDC 581)1
Completion of the following clinical experiences:
EDC 581School Counseling Practicum5
Prerequisites: (1) Successful completion of all coursework with the following exceptions: EDC 502, EDC 503, EDC 505, or EDC 506 (2) Recommendation of the Counselor Professional Education Advisory Board and FBI clearance for non-teachers
EDC 583Counseling Internship I: School4
EDC 584Counseling Internship II: School4
Completion of the following:
(To be taken during EDC 583 and EDC 584)
EDC 596AGraduate Action Research Project0
EDC 596BGraduate Action Research Project0
*M.A. candidates must complete the following thesis:
Graduate Thesis
Graduate Thesis
EDC 597Exit Exam0
EDC 599Master's Oral Examination0
Chemical dependency certification is available with this program; see advisor.

Certification: Chemical Dependency (12)

EDC 535Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
EDC 552Alcohol/Drug Family Counseling and Treatment3
EDC 572Physiology Pharmacology for Addiction2
EDC 573HIV/AIDS Prevention & Treatment1
EDC 574Community Prevention Methods2
EDC 575Screening & Assessment for Co-Occuring Disorders2

Certification: Residency Educational Staff Associate (50)

(School Counselor P-12)
Prerequisites:
Orientation to Schools
Exceptional Learners and Inclusion (for non-teachers)
Required core course:
EDU 550Core: Milestones in Education3
Required counseling courses:
EDC 501Orientation to Professional Counseling3
EDC 502Development Across the Life Span3
EDC 503Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling3
EDC 504Counseling Theories3
EDC 505Career Development and Counseling3
EDC 506Consultation in the Helping Professions3
EDC 507Measurement and Evaluation2
EDC 511The Counseling Process3
EDC 512Introduction to Group Counseling (to be taken concurrently with EDC 512L; prerequisite: full admission)3
EDC 521Psychoeducational Assessment2
EDC 522Role and Function of the School Counselor3
EDC 523Legal and Ethical Considerations in School Counseling (to be taken concurrently with EDC 581)1
EDC 535Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
EDC 581School Counseling Practicum5
Student registers for the practicum after recommendation from the Counselor Professional Education Advisory Board and FBI clearance for non-teachers.
Completion of the following internships:
EDC 583Counseling Internship I: School4
EDC 584Counseling Internship II: School4
Successful completion of the following:
Exit Exam
Master's Oral Examination

Master of Education in Social Emotional Learning, (M.Ed.)

M.Ed. in Social Emotional Learning (38)

Prerequisites:
Statistics
Pass WUCAT
EDC 501Orientation to Professional Counseling3
EDC 502Development Across the Life Span3
EDC 503Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling3
EDC 504Counseling Theories (Prerequisite: EDC 501 or concurrent enrollment)3
EDC 506Consultation in the Helping Professions (Prerequisite: EDC 503)3
EDC 509Research for Counselors (Prerequiste: Statistics)3
EDC 511The Counseling Process (Prerequiste: EDC 501 & EDC 504)3
EDC 512Introduction to Group Counseling (Prerequisite: EDC 511 and full admission)3
EDC 512LLab: Intro Group Counseling (Concurrent with EDC 512)0
EDC 521Psychoeducational Assessment (Prerequisite: Statistics)2
EDC 535Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
EDC 564Critical Issues in Social and Emotional Learning2
EDC 565Response to Complex Trauma2
EDC 566Stategies: SEL for School & Life3
EDU 596Graduate Research Project *3

*

Non-teachers must also complete a four-credit practicum, increasing the total required credits 42 semester hours.

Master in Teaching Program

www.whitworth.edu/mit

mit@whitworth.edu

Elementary Level — 56-60 Semester Credits

Secondary Level — 48-50 Semester Credits

The Whitworth Master in Teaching (MIT) Program was initiated in 1989 as a result of the Washington State Legislature calling for alternative teacher-education programs. It was the first such program in the state. Part of a nationwide movement to strengthen America’s corps of teachers by putting successful members of society’s workforce into teaching positions, MIT programs provide schools with mature teachers who understand the demands of the real world and whose teaching reflects these realities.

Those pursuing this option include professionals who are changing careers, those who are re-entering the work force, and recent graduates of undergraduate institutions. The professors teaching in the program are from both the higher education level and the K-12 public schools. Coursework and assignments are integrated and are both theoretical and practical. Upon successful completion of the program, candidates earn a Residency Teacher Certificate and a master in teaching degree.

This progressive, performance-based, cohort teacher certification and master’s degree program extends over 13 months of full-time coursework and a year-long school practicum. This rigorous program is characterized by 1) integration of academic work with an ongoing field experience; 2) programmatic coherence both from course to course and from on-campus to field work; 3) systematic study of classroom practice; and 4) individual self-reflection and renewal. All teacher candidates design a teacher work sample (TWS). Through this performance assessment, MIT candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate and improve student learning. Because of the significance of the TWS, most of the courses in the program address specific standards of the TWS.

Admission Requirements
  • Evidence of successful work with children or youth
  • Bachelor’s degree in an approved teaching endorsement area from a regionally accredited college or university
  • Grade-point average of 3.0 for the last half of college. Graduate coursework and/or work history will be considered
  • Completion of online application available at www.whitworth.edu/mit, where applicants will complete the following:
    • $35 application fee
    • A written two- to three-page statement on why the candidate has chosen teaching as a profession and why s/he has selected the MIT program at Whitworth University for professional preparation
    • A current resume
    • Submission of three recommendations, requested via online forms once the application process is initiated
    • Submission of the character-and-fitness supplement
  • Official transcripts from all colleges attended
  • An interview with the MIT faculty which will be scheduled after all application documents are submitted.
  • Basic-skills test: WEST-B (www.west.nesinc.com to register online). There are three sections to this test. Two of the three must be passed for provisional admission. All sections must be passed by the end of the summer term for full admission. SAT and ACT scores can be accepted in lieu of the WEST-B
  • WEST-E subject-matter text.  The WEST-E must be taken prior to the start of the program for provisional admission. All sections of the WEST-E must be passed by the end of fall term (December) for full admission.

All admissions to the MIT Program are conditional. Full admittance is granted upon successful completion of summer and fall coursework and passage of all WEST-E and WEST-B tests.

Applications for the program will be accepted through April 1 or until program capacity is reached. It is advisable to apply as early as possible.

Please note: 530 series courses are taken by all MIT students. 540 series are taken by elementary track students and 550 series courses are taken by secondary track students.

Education Administration Courses

EDA 501 Organizational Behavior and Leadership3
This course includes practical issues of leadership and management in the context of different cultures, including study of Total Quality Management. Topics include leadership dynamics, group motivation, architecture of organizations, and comparative management techniques based on the patterns of organizational behavior in the U.S. and other countries.
EDA 506 Business and Organizational Ethics2
This course explores ethical implications of practices in modern and traditional societies. Value issues relating to bribes, advertising and sales, quality control, environmental standards, community involvement and philanthropy, truthfulness and censorship are emphasized.
EDA 511 Orientation to Leadership1
Beginning course in the school administration and administration leadership programs. Focus on understanding of self as leader and on the importance of the interpersonal relationship aspects of effective leadership.
EDA 512 Visionary and Moral Leadership3
The theoretical base that informs management and leadership in organizational contexts, including leadership theory, organizational theory, development and implementation of a vision, and transformational leadership. Includes applied learning through a project-based approach in a K-12 or organizational setting.
EDA 514 Leadership for School Improvement3
Development of skills to foster systemic change toward improved student learning, including how to develop a learning culture focused on learning, how to do strategic planning and how to manage student behavior to enhance the learning environment.
EDA 515 Organizational Management2
Focus on the skills to set up efficient and effective management systems in educational settings. Topics include finance and resource management and allocation, safety and security issues, the use of technology to streamline management functions and systems analysis.
EDA 516 Building Community3
Understanding the importance of context in order to serve all stakeholders in a learning community. Meeting the needs of special and diverse populations and mobilizing community resources.
EDA 517 Moral Leadership in a Democratic Society3
Legal, policy and ethical aspects of being a school leader; focus on current issues and political components of being an educational advocate for students and schools. Exploration of educating citizens for full participation in a democracy.
EDA 518 Intercultural Business Communications.2
This course is designed to fine-tune skills in communication within the culture of international business. Exploration of the meaning of "culture" and practical strategies on how to communicate and work more effectively with people from other cultures is emphasized.
EDA 520 Legal & Policy Foundations2
Students will develop a heightened sensitivity and awareness of the important role legal require- ments play in administering today's school programs successfully. Emphasis will be placed on realistic situations that have direct relevance to educational leaders in Washington and Idaho.
EDA 521 Public School Finance2
Survey of the financial dimensions of public school administration including: budget development and management; the role of state, local, and federal agencies in school finance issues; collective bargaining; personnel; accountability; the special levy system; accounting procedures; purchasing; and risk management. Summer term.
EDA 526 Integrated Marketing Strategies2
Managerial marketing concepts applied in industrialized countries. Global marketing activities related to both strategic and tactical solutions. Options range from agents to direct foreign investment. Consideration of initial entry phase to expansion and global rationalization for both large and small entities. Characteristics, trends, opportunities, market research, planning and control issues. Interaction through market/product analysis projects and case studies.
EDA 530 Entrepreneurship2
A practical hands-on consulting experience whereby students work with local entrepreneurs in developing U.S. and international business plans and competing for sustainable financing of a small business.
EDA 531 Administrative and Instructional Practices in Higher Education3
Overview of administrative and instructional practices in higher education. Includes an examination of organizational structure, governance, hiring procedures, faculty and staff supervision and other administrative concerns in colleges and universities. Course development and teaching strategies for adult learners will be explored.
EDA 540 Effective Leadership and Organization4
Includes the understanding of leadership and the importance of the interpersonal relationship aspects of effective leadership. Includes the skills for efficient and effective management systems in educational settings. Other topics include resource allocation, safety and security issues and use of technology to enhance the learning environment.
EDA 541 Instructional Leadership for School Improvement4
Includes skills in the areas of teacher and staff supervision with the goal of improved student learning. Includes instructional coaching, principles of adult learning, development of a positive school culture, and management of student behavior to enhance the learning environment.
EDA 542 Building Community4
Understanding the importance of context in order to serve all stakeholders in a learning community. Meeting the needs of special and diverse popula- tions and mobilizing community resources. Fall semester.
EDA 543 Visionary and Moral Leadership4
Covers the theoretical base that informs management and leadership in organizational contexts including leadership theory, development and implementation of a vision and transformational leadership. Also includes legal, policy, and ethical aspects of school leadership as related to current issues and political components of being an educational advocate for students and schools.
EDA 581 Internship I: Administration, P-123
Participation in a wide range of activities that constitute the normal responsibilities of the elementary- or secondary-school principal; done under the direct supervision of a public school administrator and a Whitworth University supervisor. Skills are evidenced through competency-based performance checks. Internship includes 540 hours and the opening and closing activities of the school year and is required for residency administrator P-12 principal certification and program administrator. Grade is Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory.
EDA 582 Internship II: Administration, P-123
Participation in a wide range of activities that constitute the normal responsibilities of the elementary or secondary school principal under the direct supervision of a public school administrator and a Whitworth University supervisor. Skills are evidenced through competency-based performance checks. Internship includes 540 hours and the opening and closing activities of the school year. Required for residency administrator P-12 principal certification and program administrator. Grade is Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory.
EDA 588 Internship I: Administrative Leadership3
360 hours of participation in a wide range of activities that constitute the normal responsibilities of an administrator; done under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor and a Whitworth University supervisor. Skills are evidenced through competency-based performance checks. Grade is Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory.
EDA 589 Internship II:Administrative Leadership3
Participation in a wide range of activities that constitute the normal responsibilities of an administrator under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor and a Whitworth University supervisor. Skills are evidenced through competency-based performance checks. Grade is Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory. Prerequisite: EDA 588.

Education Counseling Courses

EDC 501 Orientation to Professional Counseling3
Review of the history, ethics, roles and functions, organizational structures, licensing and credential standards of helping professions. Permission of program coordinator. Fee.
EDC 502 Development Across the Life Span3
Overview of human development, life stages, normal and abnormal behaviors, personality theories, and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: EDC-501.
EDC 503 Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling3
Development of effective multicultural counseling skills with diverse populations. Exploration of ethnicity, culture, gender, socioeconomic status, disability, religious beliefs, and the impact of stereotyping. Prerequisite for Consultation in the Helping Professions. Prerequisite: EDC 501 & 511. Fee.
EDC 504 Counseling Theories3
Introduction to ethical standards and major models of therapeutic change in the counseling profession. The basic tenets of each model including assumptions concerning personality development and functioning and therapeutic process. Techniques and procedures will be emphasized.
EDC 505 Career Development and Counseling3
Overview and application in various settings and populations of career-development theories, decision-making models, career assessment and planning, aspects of career education, and sources of occupational information and career-education materials.
EDC 506 Consultation in the Helping Professions3
Theories and techniques necessary to collaborate effectively with administration, staff, faculty and parents within and across schools, community agencies, and family settings. Non-counseling majors in the helping professions must have graduate standing or instructor's permission. Also listed as EDU 436. (Students must register for graduate-level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDC 501. Fee.
EDC 507 Measurement and Evaluation2
Basic principles of measurement and evaluation; exploration of theoretical and statistical foundations and legal, ethical and diversity issues pertaining to appraisal of various target populations in education and counseling. Fee.
EDC 509 Research for Counselors3
Development of knowledge and skills to be effective consumers of published research findings as well as conductors of research including needs assessment and program evaluation in the helping professions. Review of potential research-related legal and ethical issues. Prerequisite: EDC 501.
EDC 510 Therapy for Children and Families2
This course is designed to provide an overview of therapeutic theories and strategies for working with children. A review of diagnoses unique to children, as well as disorders that manifest differently in children than in adults is provided. Therapeutic issues unique to children will be discussed. Effective interventions for children will be demonstrated and practiced.
EDC 511 The Counseling Process3
Application of various theories of counseling and interviewing with emphasis on development of skills and techniques. Prerequisite: EDC 501 & 504.
EDC 512 Introduction to Group Counseling3
Introduction to various group counseling models with an emphasis on leadership types, communication skills, ethical and legal issues, application of current research, group techniques, composition and size. Concurrent lab required. Prerequisite: EDC 504 & 511.
EDC 512L Lab: Intro Group Counseling0
Required lab to be taken with EDC 512. Fee.
EDC 514 Therapy for Adolescent and Families2
This course is designed is designed to provide an overview of therapeutic theories and strategies for working with adolescents and families. Therapeutic issues unique to adolescents and their families will be discussed including substance abuse and its impact on psychosocial development. Effective interventions for adolescents will be demonstrated and practiced.
EDC 515 Orientation to Schools2
This is a course for non-teaching school counselor candidates. The content includes human growth and development, learning theory, classroom management and instructional theory. It will also help candidates understand how to function effectively as counselors in the school culture. A field component is included. This course must be completed prior to the School Counselor Practicum (EDC 581).
EDC 521 Psychoeducational Assessment2
Study of assessment needs within school settings that support student achievement, including individualized comprehensive assessment of state learning goals and essential academic-learning requirements, learning styles, emotional intelligence, mental health and functional behavior analysis, with emphasis on the school counselor's role in individual and group assessment. Prerequisite: EDC 507. Jan Term. Fee.
EDC 522 Role and Function of the School Counselor3
Integration of research, theory and practice in preparation for service to students that is consistent with the university goals and conceptual models within helping professions.
EDC 523 Legal and Ethical Considerations in School Counseling1
Comprehensive overview of ethical issues, legal statutes, and litigation that affects counseling services and informs counselor behaviors in school settings, with emphasis on ethical standards and legal parameters for individual practitioners.
EDC 532 Psychopathology & Assessment3
Course focuses on conducting individualized comprehensive assessments, utilizing diagnostic criteria found in DSM-V, crafting intervention goals and objectives, creating an action plan, and evaluating client progress. Prerequisite: EDC-531.
EDC 533 Legal and Ethical Considerations in Counseling1
Comprehensive study of ethical issues, legal statutes, and litigation that have had an impact upon the therapeutic environment and that inform counselor behavior.
EDC 535 Introduction to Chemical Dependency2
Provides a basic understanding of chemical dependency and a framework for understanding the fundamental elements of addiction. This course is designed to assist helping professionals and teachers understand individuals who are suffering from use, abuse, or dependency on drugs. Prerequisite: EDC 501.
EDC 551 Therapeutic Alliances With Children and Adolescents3
Tailors skills for meeting the developmental issues, mental-health challenges, family dynamics, school involvement, and community-response needs of young clients. Exploration of creative techniques, animal-assisted therapy, and play therapy.
EDC 552 Alcohol/Drug Family Counseling and Treatment3
This online/hybrid course is designed to provide an overview of the structural, functional and systems approaches as applied to chemical dependent family treatment. Focus will be on issues related to family stages of adaptation to chemical dependency, family roles, etc. Prerequisite: EDC 535.
EDC 553 Intro to Marriage and Family2
This course provides an introduction to counseling of individuals, groups, couples, and families. Students will become familiarized with roles and functions, standards of care, ethical guidelines and legal considerations, racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, equity issues, and an understanding of the historical, philosophical, and social roots of MFT. Additional contextual dimensions (community needs assessment, intervention, consultation, education, outreach, and program implementation) and knowledge and skill base is increased via an exploration and project development regarding the current community base.
EDC 554 Counseling Behavioral Disorders in Children3
An overview of behavior disorders and their systematic impact, including attention deficit disorder, autism, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Exploration of collaborative programs, counseling techniques, behavior management, skills training curriculum, and therapeutic games as possible intervention approaches.
EDC 555 Spirituality and Counseling3
Theory and practice of integration of religion, spirituality, and psychotherapy. Investigates the tension and harmony between faith and counseling and introduces the standards of professional practice in counseling religious clients.
EDC 556 Research Evaluation & Writing2
This course provides the opportunity to research areas related to the student's major field of study, develop investigative research skills, and improve academic writing.
EDC 557 Family Systems3
The objective of this course is to acquaint the beginning student of marriage and the family with the framework commonly known as "systems theory." Both the lecture material and the readings are directed toward helping the student to "think systems," i.e. to conceptualize the dynamics of family relationships in systemic terms in a manner consistent with a recovery-oriented understanding of care. The course examines a variety of issues related to social processes within the family and without, including developmental/family life cycle concerns examined from an ecological perspective of family stress and resilience. Different theories of family interaction will be surveyed, with the family conceptualized as an integrated behavioral, emotional, and linguistic system.
EDC 558 Theories of Family Therapy3
This course examines the issues of family therapy, stressing the application of general systems theory. The focus is on the major constructs in family therapy, identification of family structures and communication patterns, and the formulation of treatment goals.
EDC 559 Theories of Couple and Marriage Therapy3
This course examines the issues of family therapy, stressing the application of general systems theory. The focus is on the major constructs in family therapy, identification of family structures and communication patterns, and the formulation of treatment goals.
EDC 560 Psychopharmacology2
This course examines the pharmacological impact of drugs on the brain with a particular emphasis on clinically-diseased states. Review of mental illness and the medications used to treat various disorders. Classes of medications will be discussed. Side effects, monitoring and efficacy will be explored. The role of the non prescriber in encouraging and enhancing medication compliance in persons with mental illness will be explored.
EDC 561 Advanced Systems Theory: Critical Issues in Mft3
The course prepares students for the potential ethical and legal dilemmas that arise in the marriage and family therapy profession. This course teaches students ethical standards associated with the profession, along with core values essential to personal and professional development. Students will develop an ethical decision making model and apply it to contemporary issues facing the marriage and family professional.
EDC 562 Ethics in Human Sexuality2
This course is designed to provide an in depth overview of marital/couple therapy. The course will address theories of marital interaction and two approaches to clinical treatment with couples. Assessment and treatment issues regarding domestic violence will be discussed.
EDC 563 Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy3
The study of the biological and psychological aspects of human sexuality and the treatment of sexual dysfunction in couples.
EDC 564 Critical Issues in Social and Emotional Learning2
This course examines issues related to social emotional learning and development. It will explore contributing factors and how teachers and caring professionals can help children overcome problems that impact their motivation to learn as well as their interpersonal skills.
EDC 565 Response to Complex Trauma2
Students will learn critical supportive and therapeutic skills to effectively help children, adolescents and their families deal with the impact of trauma. Topics include: sources and effects of complex trauma, as well as the different types of trauma and how these experiences are manifested. Graduate level course. This is a step up course by permission of instructor.
EDC 566 Stategies: SEL for School & Life3
This course provides teachers and other professionals with strategies to promote social emotional learning in children that will enable them to be successful in school and in life. Graduate level course. This is a step up course by permission of instructor.
EDC 572 Physiology Pharmacology for Addiction2
This course covers the psychological, physiological and sociological effects of mood altering substances and behaviors. Emphasizes pharmacological effects of tolerance, dependency/withdrawal, cross addiction and drug interaction. Course needed for CDP certification. Prerequisite: EDC 535.
EDC 573 HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment1
This course is designed to teach participants the basic concepts of HIV/AIDS prevention, transmission and the correlation between chemical dependency and mental health issues. Social issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, STD and Chemical Dependency will also be explored and dialogue will be encouraged. The connection of HIV and STD's to alcohol and chemical usage will be made. This course is offered on a weekend accelerated format.
EDC 574 Community Prevention Methods2
This online/hybrid course is designed to provide students an overview and understanding of the significant issues and trends in the community and family behavioral health with an emphasis behavioral health promotion and disease prevention as it relates to chemical dependency.
EDC 575 Screening & Assessment for Co-Occurring Disorders2
Since many individuals suffering from addiction disorder also suffer from mental illness, substance abuse professionals frequently encounter clients with psychological symptoms and problems related to their substance abuse. This course will provide the student with an understanding of co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders, how such individuals are treated and how case management is conducted. It includes an integrated approach to address the issues accompanying the illness.
EDC 581 School Counseling Practicum5
Preliminary field experience offering intensive skill development necessary to function in the role of professional counselor in school settings. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in EDC 523; permission of program faculty; recommendation by PEAB (Professional Education Advisory Board). Optional concurrent enrollment permitted in EDC 506. The student will meet for individual supervision with their university supervisor for tape critique a minimum of one hour per week in addition to the practicum seminar. Spring semester.
EDC 581A Practicum in Social Emotional Learning4
Preliminary field experience offering intensive skill development necessary to function in the role of professional counselor in school settings. Prerequisite: permission of program faculty. The student will meet for individual supervision with their university supervisor for tape critique a minimum of one hour per week in addition to the practicum seminar.
EDC 582 Community-Agency Counseling Practicum5
Preliminary field experience offering intensive skill development necessary to function in the role of professional counselor in community agencies or church settings. Spring semester. Prerequisites: EDC-532 with a grade of B, permission of program faculty and concurrent enrollment in EDC 533. Optional concurrent enrollment permitted in EDC 506.
EDC 583 Counseling Internship I: School4
Field experience in a school setting under direct individual and group supervision. Students will register for EDC 583 in the fall and EDC 584 in the spring. Prerequisite: completion of all coursework; grade of "B" or better in EDC 581 and EDC 523; permission of program faculty.
EDC 584 Counseling Internship II: School4
Field experience in a school setting under direct individual and group supervision. Students will register for EDC 583 in the fall and EDC 584 in the spring.
EDC 585 Counseling Internship I: Community Agency1-4
Field experience focused on preparing students for employment as professional counselors within community agencies or church settings. Students will register for EDC 585 in the fall and EDC 586 in the spring. Prerequisite: permission of program faculty and grades of "B" or better in EDC 582 and EDC 533. This course is graded S/NS.
EDC 586 Counseling Internship II: Community Agency1-4
Field experience focused on preparing students for employment as professional counselors within community agencies or church settings. Students will register for EDC 585 in the fall and EDC 586 in the spring. This course is graded S/NS.
EDC 588 Peer Review1
A state-required course for school counselors to demonstrate counseling knowledge and skills during their employment as counselors prior to recommendation for continuing ESA certification.
EDC 596A Graduate Action Research Project0
Project focuses on services offered by the student during internship and explores treatment needs and intervention efficacy. Fall semester.
EDC 596B Graduate Action Research Project0
Project focuses on services offered by the student during internship and explores treatment needs and intervention efficacy. Spring semester.
EDC 597 Exit Exam0
Students should register during the semester they anticipate completion of all coursework. Fee.
EDC 598A Graduate Thesis3
A major advisor (chair) and two committee advisors direct the thesis study. Approved copies, ready for binding, must be submitted to the Graduate Studies in Education Office one week before the end of the term in which the degree is anticipated. Prerequisite: advanced approval required from the academic advisor to enroll in the thesis option. Fall semester.
EDC 598B Graduate Thesis3
A major advisor (chair) and two committee advisors direct the thesis study. Approved copies, ready for binding, must be submitted to the Graduate Studies in Education Office one week before the end of the term in which the degree is anticipated. Prerequisite: advanced approval required from the academic advisor to enroll in the thesis option. Spring semester. Fee.
EDC 599 Master's Oral Examination0
Oral defense of the thesis project. Exam is directed by chair of thesis-committee. Students should register during the semester they anticipate completion of the thesis project. Fee.

Education Gifted and Talented Courses

EDG 500 Gifted and Talented Short Courses1-2
A variety of graduate short-course topics presented for elective credit. Descriptions are available through the Center for Gifted Education.
EDG 501 Gifted and Talented Short Course (Continuing Basis)1
Selected graduate short-course topics taught on a continuing basis. Descriptions are available through the Center for Gifted Education.
EDG 508 Differentiating Instruction for Highly Capable Students1
Approaches to design differentiated curriculum and instructional strategies in all content areas to meet the needs of gifted students in today's classrooms. Differentiation by content, process, product and assessment using the parallel curriculum model and other current research-based practices. Summer semester, online.
EDG 528 New Directions in Gifted Education1
Through current literature, active websites and recent conference materials, students review foundational ideas, latest identification tools, new curriculum methods, technology developments and creativity ideas. Jan Term, online.
EDG 551 Nature and Needs of the Gifted Learner3
A review of current theories and interpretation of social and emotional needs of the gifted, and practical classroom applications and program development, as well as program options for the gifted student. Appropriate information to relate to parents. Spring semester, online.
EDG 552 Teaching for Independence and Responsibility2
Methods of teaching, content organization, and learning styles identification to assist in the development of positive self-concept as a basis for subsequent achievement in school and career. Summer.
EDG 553 Creativity and Analytical Thinking3
This course will provide opportunities and strategies to teach students to think. Students enrolled in this course will also learn how and when to teach these higher-order thinking skills, which include two processes: divergent (creative thinking) and convergent (critical/analytical thinking), and how to assess the effectiveness of each process. Applies to any content and any grade level. Fall semester, even years, online.
EDG 554 Strategies and Instructional Models for Challenging Bright Students3
Characteristics, identification, special problems and program models for the gifted and talented are studied, as are student-centered curriculum materials appropriate for specific grade and/or subject areas. Spring semester, online.
EDG 571 Teaching the Underachiever3
This course explores leading considerations for underachievement in schools today: cultural differences, poverty, brain-based learning and appropriately challenging gifted students. Current research and effective practices to identify and remediate underachievement will be shared.
EDG 581 Practicum/Field Study: Gifted and Talented1-3
A practicum or field study experience (40 or 80 hours for the field study; 120 hours for the practicum) under the direction of on-site and Whitworth University supervisors. Grade is Pass/No Credit. Prerequisite: proposal and setting approval from the director of the Center for Gifted Education is required. Fall and spring semesters.
EDG 596 Graduate Research Project3
In lieu of a practicum, if necessary. The graduate research project proposal requires approval from the director of the Center for Gifted Education, the director of Graduate Studies, and the Institutional Review Board (IRB). The director of the Center for Gifted Education will supervise the 120-hour project. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of EDU 515.
EDG 597 Comprehensive Exam0
Exit Exam
EDG 598 Portfolio: Specialty Endorsement0
Final assessment to show evidence of knowledge and skill to meet Washington state standards and competencies in the Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement.

Education Courses

EDU 501 Advanced Educational Psychology3
A systematic survey of educational psychology for information principles of practical value to teachers and administrators in the total public- school program. The development of personality through counseling and guidance is discussed.
EDU 502 Curriculum Development3
Curriculum design, development and implementation with emphasis on successful models of practical procedures for planning and operation of instructional programs using K-12 curriculum.
EDU 510 Prof Teach Seminar4
EDU 511 ProTeach Support Seminar2
Students will implement the professional growth plan by completing action-research projects and by documenting their proficiency in the three standards and 17 criteria required by Washington's professional certificate. Prerequisite: EDU-510.
EDU 514 Educational Statistics2
Study of statistics needed to understand educational research and to do primary research.
EDU 515 Educational Research4
Development of basic research skills; evaluation of current educational research and new knowledge in education. A research paper is required. Includes computer lab time and development of the research paper. Prerequisites: unconditional admission and computer literacy.
EDU 526 Cultural Competence and Society3
Survey of historical and societal influences on the education of cultural groups in the USA. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Also listed as EDU 326 (Graduate students must register for a graduate level course and complete an extra project). Repeated for credit. Spring semester.
EDU 544 Children's Literature & Social Studies Literacy3
This course is designed to provide an introduction to children's literature as well as a foundation for teaching social studies. It highlights the genres of the literature, learning about and through literature, and using quality literature integrated with other content. For social studies instruction, the course examines the state standards for social studies in the areas of world and American history, geography and civics and how to use children's literature as a content source for those areas of curriculum. Fall and spring semesters & Jan Term offerings.
EDU 546 Diagnosis and Treatment of Reading Diff. Disabilities3
Identification and causes of reading problems. Study of diagnostic instruments and intervention strategies used in group and individual situations. Administration and interpretation of standardized and informal assessments. Also listed as EDE 446. Fall & Summer.
EDU 548 Content Area Reading and Writing2
Strategies for improving comprehension of content area materials, adapting lessons for a wide range of learners, analyzing the appropriateness of written materials, and connecting writing to the content area. Fall and spring semesters. Also listed as EDM 553 and EDU 458.
EDU 550 Core: Milestones in Education3
Survey of the history of Western education, with particular attention to the links between education and Christianity and the liberal arts tradition. Review of current philosophical issues confronting education against their historical and intellectual backgrounds. This is an interdisciplinary course. Fall & Spring semesters.
EDU 561 Second-Language Acquisition3
Overview of how students acquire a first and second language. Socio-cultural and political factors affecting second-language acquisition. Also listed as EDU 361. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Spring.
EDU 562 ELL Methodology3
Application of language-acquisition theory to the teaching of limited-English-proficient students. Introduction to teaching strategies employing listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as the purpose and administration of language-proficiency assessment. Also listed as EDU 362. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program.) Fall.
EDU 563 ELL Methods Language Arts/Reading3
Development and application of methods in teaching literacy to limited English-proficient students in K-12-level academic areas. Also listed as EDU 362. (Students must register for graduate level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program.) Online, Fall and Summer. On campus, Spring.
EDU 564 CLD Field Experience II1-3
Placement in classrooms with limited English-proficient students. Emphasis on application of literacy skills to the academic areas taught at the K-12 levels. Flexible scheduling and site placements. Prerequisite: EDU-561, 562 or 563.
EDU 565 CLD Assess & Evaluation3
Topics include assessment and evaluation of English Learners in placement, content-area classrooms, and large-scale assessment arenas. Assessment issues, principles, instruments, and methods of assessment related to academic vocabulary proficiency and academic achievement for English learners are addressed.
EDU 567 Intro to CLD in Education1
Development of the intercultural communication and teaching skills at the culture-general and culture-specific levels of understanding. Examination of the nature and use of power in society and the impact of one's own cultural values, attitudes, and beliefs on K-12 students.
EDU 596 Graduate Research Project3
The elementary/secondary M.Ed. program's capstone project requiring a minimum 120 hours of research and design of specific materials appropriate to use with a designated group of students under the supervision of a Whitworth University supervisor. The project proposal must be approved by the director/chair of GSE, the supervisor/instructor, and the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Letter grade is assigned. Prerequisite: EDU-515.
EDU 597 Exit Exam/Project0
Exit-exam information is available through a student's graduate advisor. All exams must be completed prior to the month of a student's degree posting.
EDU 598A Thesis3
Thesis study is directed by a major advisor (chair) and two committee advisors. The thesis committee conducts the final oral examination. Approved copies of the thesis, ready for binding, must be submitted to the Graduate Studies in Education office one week before the end of the term in which the degree is anticipated. Letter grade is assigned. Prerequisite: advanced approval from your academic advisor and the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Fall semester.
EDU 598B Thesis3
Thesis study is directed by a major advisor (chair) and two committee advisors. The thesis committee conducts the final oral examination. Approved copies of the thesis, ready for binding, must be submitted to the Graduate Studies in Education office one week before the end of the term in which the degree is anticipated. Letter grade is assigned. Prerequisite: advanced approval from your academic advisor and the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Spring semester. Fee.

Master in Teaching Courses

EDM 530A Educational Foundations and Critical Issues1
Philosophical foundations of education, critical issues related to education, and the MIT candidate as a compassionate and ethical teacher-scholar. (Elementary and secondary.)
EDM 530B Educational Foundations and Critical Issues2
Philosophical foundations of education, critical issues related to education, and the MIT candidate as a compassionate and ethical teacher-scholar. Elementary and secondary.
EDM 530C Educational Foundations and Critical Issues1
This course presses teacher candidates to reflect upon their professional development and plans for continued growth. Candidates also recognize potential indicators across various categories of child abuse and neglect. A review of legal responsibilities pertaining to the reporting of abuse will also be learned.
EDM 531A Exceptional Learner and Differentiated Instruction (A)1
This course provides an overview of the exceptional learner and introduces differentiated instructional strategies that address different learners' needs in a regular classroom.
EDM 531B Exceptional Learner and Differential Instruction (B)2
A continuation of EDM 531A based on the professional development over the year.
EDM 532 Child and Adolescent Development and Learning Theory2
Improvement of learning and teaching effectiveness, including recent developments in human development (cognitive, social, emotional, moral), child growth and development, human learning (behavioral and cognitive) and teaching/instruction. Elementary and secondary.
EDM 533A Research and Assessment (A)1
This course provides an overview of educational research and analysis of the current educational research literature. Students are also introduced to action research and effective classroom assessment strategies.
EDM 533B Research and Assessment (B)1
Students develop an action research project that is based on WA State Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs) and utilizes current research and assessment practices.
EDM 533C Research and Assessment (C)1
Analysis of classroom based assessment data gathered from the action research project to determine impact on student learning.
EDM 535 Technology in Education1
The goal of this course is to prepare participants to teach with the technology found in today's schools. They will learn how to gain access to information and how to communicate using current technology, including the Internet and multimedia. They will also begin developing technological strategies that will be applied to other education courses in the field. Elementary and secondary.
EDM 536A Culturally Competent Teachers2
Examination of how attitudes, behaviors and values are shaped; the nature and use of power in society, one's own values, principles of effective multicultural education, cultural influences on learning, and intercultural communication skill training. Elementary and secondary.
EDM 536B Field Experience: Multicultural/Intercultural Education3
A field experience teaching students from a culture other than one's own. To increase one's teaching skills across difference. (Full time in a school classroom for approximately a three week block). Fee.
EDM 538 Teacher-Scholar Seminar & Teacher Performance Assessment1
This seminar provides the MIT teacher candidates with the opportunity to complete the application process for teacher certification and prepare the job seeking portfolio. This seminar also prepares MITs to be ready to take the high stakes teacher test, Teacher Performance Assessment(edTPA), that must be passed before they can earn a teacher certificate in Washington State.
EDM 539A Teacher Work Sample1
The MIT teacher candidates begin meeting the standards of the TWS. Through this performance assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to plan for and facilitate learning by meeting the nine TWS standards.
EDM 539B Teacher Work Sample1
The MIT teacher candidate implements the TWS during full-time student teaching. Candidates gather data regarding the extent to which their plan and their teaching had a positive impact on student learning. Based on reality, modifications to the initially developed TWS are made.
EDM 539C Teacher Work Sample1
The MIT teacher candidate edits and completes all nine components of the TWS. Each candidate shares the contents of their TWS with peers and faculty.
EDM 540 Math for MIT4
This theory/methods course prepares elementary teacher candidates to teach mathematics in K-8 through using the constructivist approach. Inquiry, contextual problems, use of manipulatives and models, and strategies for problem solving/application approaches to math will be used.
EDM 542A Elementary Social Studies: U.S. History1
These courses introduce the content of U.S. history (EDM 542 A), civics (EDM 542 B), and economics (EDM 542 C) that are typically taught at grades 1-8 in the state of Washington. Guiding the content are the benchmarks set forth for each grade level as stated in Washington State Essential Academic Learning requirements (EALRs).
EDM 542B Elementary Social Studies: Civics1
These courses introduce the content of U.S. history (EDM 542 A), civics (EDM 542 B), and economics (EDM 542 C) that are typically taught at grades 1-8 in the state of Washington. Guiding the content are the benchmarks set forth for each grade level as stated in Washington State Essential Academic Learning requirements (EALRs).
EDM 542C Elementary Social Studies: Economics1
These courses introduce the content of U.S. history (EDM 542 A), civics (EDM 542 B), and economics (EDM 542 C) that are typically taught at grades 1-8 in the state of Washington. Guiding the content are the benchmarks set forth for each grade level as stated in Washington State Essential Academic Learning requirements (EALRs).
EDM 542D Elementary Social Studies: Pacific Northwest History1
This course introduces the concepts and content of Pacific Northwest History that is typically taught at grades 1-8 in the state of Washington guiding the content and the benchmarks set forth for each grade level as states in Washington's Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Summer Term II.
EDM 543 Language Literacy in Elementary School4
This course examines processes, methods, approaches and materials for teaching reading and language skill.
EDM 544A Elementary General Methods, Assessment, Management1
This course introduces basic teaching theories and strategies needed for culturally relevant teaching, assessing students, and managing classrooms.
EDM 544B Elementary General Methods, Assessment, Management3
This course introduces basic teaching theories and strategies needed for culturally relevant teaching, assessing students, and managing classrooms.
EDM 545A Elementary Art Methods1
This course places an emphasis on the art experience. The student will become aware of his or her own judgment and bias relating to art. The use of different media, integration of art into other content areas, and process/product will be studied. The student will become familiar with terminology and knowledge in various art programs. The student will learn how to teach art skills and concepts to elementary school children.
EDM 545C Elementary Science Methods2
This science methods course involves students in science instruction, focusing on four instructional methods utilized in the elementary classroom: inquiry, integrated, thematic, and problem-based/applied. The goal of this course is twofold: 1) to provide students with an overview of current methods and 2) to begin a resource collection of grade-level specific science content, activities, assessments, resources and references for use during the teacher-scholar practicum.
EDM 545D Elementary Music Methods1
Curriculum and methods for teaching music in the elementary school. Procedures and materials for teaching music in the self-contained elementary classroom. (Elementary.)
EDM 545E Elementary PE and Health Education Methods1
Methods for teaching physical education and health education in the elementary school. Current methods and materials used in developing the elementary curriculum and in teaching the appropriate activities for each grade level.
EDM 545F Elementary Social Studies Methods1
Elementary teacher candidates will learn social studies classroom techniques and strategies including: social skills instruction, storytelling, project design and implementation, multicultural appreciation, curriculum integration, creative expression, observation and reflection, and integrating global citizenship.
EDM 547A Elementary Teacher-Scholar Practicum2
This teaching experience in an elementary school classroom begins when the MIT student reports in late summer and then moves to half-time after MIT classes begin. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.
EDM 547B Elementary Teacher-Scholar Practicum10
Full-time student teaching in an assigned public elementary school classroom. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.
EDM 547C Elementary Teacher-Scholar Practicum2
Half-time student teaching in the assigned public school classroom from mid-May until the last week; full time during the last week. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. (Elementary.)
EDM 553 Literacy Across the Disciplines3
Practical approaches and effective teaching techniques for presenting reading assignments in the content areas will be presented and implemented. The focus of this course is to develop the abilities of teachers to enhance the secondary student's ability to "read to learn" rather than to "learn to read". (Secondary.)
EDM 554 Secondary General Methods/Curriculum Development and Assessment4
Principles of planning; daily lesson planning; unit development; different instructional techniques; providing for individual differences; and classroom management.
EDM 554A Secondary General Methods, Assessment, Management1
This course examines basic theory and strategies needed to plan, develop, teach, and assess effective culturally relevant lesson plans and units of study. Strategies supported by research needed to manage the physical classroom environment and to create a respectful and culturally positive learning climate that assures maximum learning will be learned.
EDM 554B Secondary General Methods, Assessment, Management3
This course examines basic theory and strategies needed to plan, develop, teach, and assess effective culturally relevant lesson plans and units of study. Strategies supported by research needed to manage the physical classroom environment and to create a respectful and culturally positive learning climate that assures maximum learning will be learned.
EDM 555B Sec English/Lang Arts Methods2
EDM 555C Sec Foreign Language Methods2
EDM 555D Sec Mathematics Methods2
EDM 555E Secondary Music Methods2
EDM 555F Sec PE/Health Methods2
EDM 555G Secondary Science Methods2
EDM 555H Sec Social Studies Methods2
EDM 557A Secondary Teacher-Scholar Practicum2
A teaching experience that begins when the MIT student reports in late summer and then moves to half time after MIT classes begin. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.
EDM 557B Secondary Teacher-Scholar Practicum10
Full-time student teaching in the assigned public secondary school classroom. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.
EDM 557C Secondary Teacher-Scholar Practicum2
Half-time student teaching in the assigned public school classroom from mid-May until the last week; full time during the last week. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. (Secondary.)
EDM 596 Elementary Teacher-Scholar Practicum1-10
Full-time student teaching in an assigned public elementary school classroom. Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.

Special Education Courses

EDS 501 Introduction to Sign Language and the Deaf4
Study of American Sign Language, language acquisition, teaching methods, teaching sequences and materials for persons with hearing impairments, communication disorders, and cognitive delays. Overview of the history of sign language as well as receptive and expressive finger-spelling. Also listed as ASL 101 (students must register for graduate-level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program). Fall semester and periodic summer offering.
EDS 502 Sign Language and the Deaf II4
Advanced study of American Sign Language and the culture of the deaf. Expansion and improvement of manual communication skills, translating or interpreting abilities, and development of mental- processing techniques for comprehending the meaning of unfamiliar signs. Overview of educational aspects of deaf culture and sign language. Also listed as ASL 102. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDS 501.
EDS 520 Exceptional Learners & Inclusion3
Provides an overview of children with disabilities, gifted education, legal issues, intervention strategies, family systems, and teaming approaches related to special education. Emphasis placed on accommodations for high incidence conditions. Introduction of Individualized Education Plans and completion of a service-learning experience in a home setting. Also listed as EDU 320 (students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Fall, spring, summer.
EDS 521 Intervention for Behavior and Motivation3
Introduction to behavior disorders, applied behavior analysis, data collection, and research design. Students plan, collect data, implement and evaluate an intervention. They learn to collect data and do functional assessments and document learning. Field experience included. Also listed as EDU 321. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDS 520.
EDS 522 Assessment and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Planning3
Practice and study of formal and informal, norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, curriculum- based, and functional assessments, including the Brigance, the Woodcock Johnson, the AAMR Adaptive Behavior Scale, the PIAT and others. Integration and implementation of assessment into the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEP) for children and youth in special education settings. Also listed as EDU 322. Students must register for graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDS 520. Fall semester.
EDS 523 Intervention for Academic Learning Problems3
Methods and strategies to address academic learning problems for students with mild disabilities in math, reading, language, writing, and spelling. Includes class-wide peer tutoring, active responding, guided notes, Precision Teaching, Direct Instruction, Success for All, data-based intervention approaches and other relevant curriculum. Service learning project included. Also listed as EDU 323. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDS 520.
EDS 524 Early Intervention for Special Education3
Instructional methods, management strategies and interdisciplinary intervention techniques appropriate for working with children with disabilities from birth to age six in integrated settings. Includes strategies for supporting families and developing Individual Family Service Programs (IFSP). Also listed as EDU 424. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program). Prerequisite: EDS 520.
EDS 526 Intervention for Severe Communication, Sensory and Physical Problems3
Methods and strategies for working with students who have low incidence and multiple disabilities, with emphasis on functional skills, augmentative communication, positioning and handling techniques, mobility, social-skill development and adaptive behaviors. Program planning and implementation. Also listed as EDU 426. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program).
EDS 530 Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder3
In this course we will discuss the diagnostic criteria and defining characteristics of autism spectrum disorder and related disabilities, as well as effective interventions and the impact of having a child with autism on a family. Prerequisite: EDU 321 or EDS 521.
EDS 534 Early Speech, Language and Literacy3
Introduction to components of speech and language; and change involving second language acquisition whether oral or manual, with application to literacy and learning for students with disabilities. Junior/Senior standing or Graduate students. Prerequisite: EDU 320/EDS 520. Spring.
EDS 536 Intervention through Positive Behavior Support3
An overview of theory, research and methods related to identifying community values and establishing school-wide Positive Behavior Support. Includes functional behavior assessment, data collection methods, interventions and behavior management strategies to respond effectively to students who exhibit severe challenging behavior.
EDS 538 Early Intervention Interdisciplinary Method3
Early childhood special education methods using an interdisciplinary and Activity-Based Intervention approach. Requires on-site seminar and fieldwork. Junior/Senior standing or Graduate student. Prerequisite: EDU 424/EDS 524. Summer.
EDS 562 Ethical Research and Treatment Method3
Ethical considerations for professional practice and research in behavioral assessment, treatment, and systems. Prerequisites EDS 521, EDS 536.
EDS 564 Advanced Readings in Applied Behavior Analysis3
Classic and current studies in applied behavior analysis concepts, research, and effective intervention in preparation for Behavior Analyst Certification Board Exam and professional practice. Prerequisites EDS 521 and EDS 536.
EDS 581 Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-81
A teaching-assistant practicum of 30 hours in a special-education classroom. Concurrent enrollment permissible in EDS 583/EDU 483, Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-8. Prerequisites: EDS 520/EDU 320 and EDS 521/EDU 321. Also listed as EDU 481. Application is required. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program.) Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. Fall, spring, Jan Term, summer.
EDS 582 Practicum: Special Education, Middle/High School1
A teaching-assistant practicum of 30 hours in a special-education classroom. Concurrent enrollment permissible in EDS 584/EDU 484. Prerequisite: EDS 520/EDU 320 and EDS 521/EDU 321. Also listed as EDU 482. Application is required. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program.) Grade is Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory. Fall, spring, Jan Term, summer.
EDS 583 Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Early Childhood/K-84
A practicum of 120 hours in a special-education classroom under teacher supervision. Application and permission required. Also listed as EDU 483. (Students must register for a graduate-level course and complete an extra project if in a graduate program).
EDS 584 Advanced Practicum: Special Education, Middle/High School4
A practicum of 120 hours in a special education classroom under teacher supervision. Application and permission required. Also listed as EDU 484. Students must register for graduate level course and complete extra project if in a graduate program. Prerequisite: EDS 582/EDU 482 or concurrent enrollment.
EDS 585 BCBA Supervised Internship Middle/High School5
Ten weeks of 25 hours each week in clinical or classroom behavioral intervention with individuals who have developmental delays, severe disabilities, or autism spectrum disorder. Must be supervised by a BCBA professional. (Must be taken for a total of 15 credits and 750 hours). This is a 3-semester field experience totaling 15 credits.
EDS 595 Exit Project1
Students submit research papers in formal presentations and for publication. A one-hour-per- week peer-group and advisor feedback meeting is required prior to the official presentation. Fee.

In this section

Dean

BARBARA SANDERS

Associate Dean

ROBERTA WILBURN

Administration Program Director

ALISON OLZENDAM

Center for Gifted Education Director

KATHRYN PICANCO

Counseling Program Coordinators

DOUG JONESRON PROSSER

Special Education Coordinator

FLINT SIMONSEN

Professors

DENNIS STERNERBETTY FRY WILLIAMS

Associate professors

LISA LAURIERALISON OLZENDAMKATHRYN PICANCORON PROSSERFLINT SIMONSENANN TEBERG

Teacher in Residence

ANNE WILCOX

Lecturers

MEGAN COZZASHARON NEVILLE-MITCHELL